#2
How big they are. Larger frets are supposed to be easier to bend on. Super-jumbos give a pseudo-scalloped feel. Most "br00t41z" guitars use jumbos, while most other guitars either use medium-jumbos, my personal favourite, or vintage Fender-style standard/normal/low frets. Dave Mustaine said something about them that was actually worthwhile I thought in an interview, let me go get that.

Edit: Nevermind, he was just stating his preference. Not that helpful.
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Last edited by necrosis1193 at Sep 23, 2010,
#3
What do Jumbo frets have to do with the br00t41z ^.^ Back to the question, I'm not sure of the difference. I've compared my tele to my Ibanez RG7321 and it's defiantly noticeable. I like bigger frets because it feels more free for my big hands, a lot more comfortable.
#4
Quote by FRr3AkOnALEaSh
What do Jumbo frets have to do with the br00t41z ^.^ Back to the question, I'm not sure of the difference. I've compared my tele to my Ibanez RG7321 and it's defiantly noticeable. I like bigger frets because it feels more free for my big hands, a lot more comfortable.


Lower tunings, thicker strings wear away at the fret wiring quicker I spose . Just my speculation I guess. :P
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#5
Quote by FRr3AkOnALEaSh
What do Jumbo frets have to do with the br00t41z ^.^


I have no idea, but I work in a music shop, and every Schecter we have has the biggest frets I've ever played.
THE FORUM UPDATE KILLED THE GRADIENT STAR

Baltimore Orioles: 2014 AL Eastern Division Champions, 2017: 75-87
Baltimore Ravens: 2012 World Champions, 2017: 4-5
2017 NFL Pick 'Em: 92-54
#6
Quote by necrosis1193
I have no idea, but I work in a music shop, and every Schecter we have has the biggest frets I've ever played.

That's why I just don't like Schecters. Big bodies, big neck, bit frets. They're just too big for me. Of course I used to own a LP so whatever.
#7
XJ frets are raised, so the strings dont touch the fretboard when fretted.
Medium jumbos are also raised, but not to the extent of XJ;s- the strings can touch the wood if pressed down hard.
Low frets cause the strings to touch the wood (i think).
#8
The main diff is probably when you bend or vibrato. More clearance = less friction from fingers to wood. A scalloped neck w/ smaller frets yields a similar result. The tonal diffs are actually slight, given that each set of frets are installed right. With taller frets you can get under the strings more to help w/ bends and stuff.
#9
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
The main diff is probably when you bend or vibrato. More clearance = less friction from fingers to wood. A scalloped neck w/ smaller frets yields a similar result. The tonal diffs are actually slight, given that each set of frets are installed right. With taller frets you can get under the strings more to help w/ bends and stuff.


I agree
#11
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
The main diff is probably when you bend or vibrato. More clearance = less friction from fingers to wood. A scalloped neck w/ smaller frets yields a similar result. The tonal diffs are actually slight, given that each set of frets are installed right. With taller frets you can get under the strings more to help w/ bends and stuff.

Pretty much this.
Bigger frets mean you're less likely to touch the fingerboard (really only applies to the lower frets) and they'll last longer because they're bigger.
Smaller frets (although this really only occurs from a lot of wear, on old guitars) can have intonation problems because once they wear enough, you cant really re-crown them, so they need to be left flat on top, causing the string break point to move further towards the bridge. But, like I said, this is a wear issue, and by the time they get to that point, its time for a re-fret really.