#1
Hey guys, couple of quick questions.
1) Can you get sharp chords? eg. taking the D chord, and moving the whole shape down a fret. If not, what are they called?
2) How do you create a chord progression? And how do you know whether to play the major or minor chord?

All advice is welcome, I just really want to start writing, and this is just nagging me
Gear:
Epiphone SG-400 (w/Hot Slags)/Chapman Guitars ML1 > Digitech Bad Monkey > Blackstar HT-5 > Danelectro Fish and Chips EQ > ETI Chorus Flanger
Snark Headstock tuner!
#2
1. youre knowledge is correct.

A A# B C C# D D# E F G G#
A Bb B C Db D Eb F G Ab

and for the record, Cb, B#, Fb and E# are real notes, just not used in that 'wording' often.

2. well, half of it is gut instinct: i know without using theory that if I want to play in G, Other chords that go are Am, C, D, Bm etc. as for the technically correct way of doing it, learn scales, and what major and minor chords go into that scale. the above chords decribed are the Gmaj scale.

to knowldgeble UGer's. I am tired, so if i have that wrong, its not n00bishness. much
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#4
Cheers guys, much appreciated
Gear:
Epiphone SG-400 (w/Hot Slags)/Chapman Guitars ML1 > Digitech Bad Monkey > Blackstar HT-5 > Danelectro Fish and Chips EQ > ETI Chorus Flanger
Snark Headstock tuner!
#5
The two basic chords used in western music are major and minor triads.

A Major triad consists of a root note, a major third above that, and a perfect fifth.

A Minor triad consists of a root note, a minor third above that, and the perfect fifth.

So, for example the chord with the notes C E G would be C major. If you drop the third half a step, it becomes C minor with the notes C Eb G. If you don't know the intervals or what I'm talking about just say so and someone can explain more in depth.

So, to answer your first question if you take the D major chord and move the whole shape down a fret, you are moving each note in that chord down one half step or semitone. The notes in D Major are D F# A, and then the chord would become Db Major with notes Db F and Ab.

2. Chord progressions are based on whatever scale you're playing in.

For example, the C Major scale contains the notes C D E F G A B.

The chords we can construct from these notes would be C Major, D minor, E minor, F Major, G major, A minor, and B diminished (root note, minor third, and a flattened fifth).
Last edited by RU Experienced? at Sep 23, 2010,
#6
Thanks man, cleared some stuff up for me
Gear:
Epiphone SG-400 (w/Hot Slags)/Chapman Guitars ML1 > Digitech Bad Monkey > Blackstar HT-5 > Danelectro Fish and Chips EQ > ETI Chorus Flanger
Snark Headstock tuner!
#7
Quote by richyt93
Thanks man, cleared some stuff up for me

You're welcome.

Again, if you're still unsure of anything just say so and I or someone else can go into more detail. Probably not me though because I have class in 15 minutes.
#8
who needs chords when you have scales?
.
Internet trolls are like sap in trees. sticky and annoying, but good on pancakes.
#11
Quote by rocker222
who needs chords when you have scales?

Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#12
Quote by richyt93
Hey guys, couple of quick questions.
1) Can you get sharp chords? eg. taking the D chord, and moving the whole shape down a fret. If not, what are they called?
2) How do you create a chord progression? And how do you know whether to play the major or minor chord?

All advice is welcome, I just really want to start writing, and this is just nagging me


1. Yes. and D# Major is D# FX and A#

2. What's your music theory background?

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 24, 2010,
#13
do you know the major scale?

I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-vii0

capitol is major, lower case is minor, the 0 is diminished. so if you were playing in the C major scale, you could use these chords:
Cmajor
Dminor
Eminor
Fmajor
Gmajor
Aminor
Bdiminished

or add 7s:
Cmajor7
Dminor7
Eminor7
Fmajor7
Gdominant7
etc.
every note has to be in the scale. if a chord includes a note that is not in the scale, its a non-diatonic chord, which isn't great for beginner chord progression writers to use.

the most common progression in blues/rock/folk/country/ska/reggae is 4-5-1, and in the key of Cmajor, that is Fmajor, Gmajor, Cmajor, and you can add alterations to make it unique, like adding sevenths (major sevenths for C and F, minor 7th for G, making the Gdominant7 chord). then common jazz progressions are 2-5-1 and 3-6-2-5-1, these would be (again in C) Dminor, Gdominant7, Cmajor, or Eminor, Aminor, Dminor, Gdominant7, Cmajor. Then you can make jazz bluesy by throwing in a 4 (in the key of C, Fmajor).

The most common formats for chord progressions are the 12 bar blues and 16 bar country progressions. these are both just 4-5-1 progressions but put in a specific order that you would likely use in the chorus of a blues, rock, or country song.

just search around for the 12 bar blues and 16 bar country formats on the internet, i dont have either 1 memorized so im not a great source for that. hope i helped!

oh and btw, if ur playing heavy metal, you wanna use the 3rd chord a lot, a common progression is 3-4, like in nthe key of C, Eminor to Fmajor, but since its metal you'd use power chords, so E5 to F5. you could put emphasis on any minor chord for a metally sound (im trying to explain this without getting into modes, i'm not doing so well) but 3rd is most common. just pointing that out because there are a lotta metal-heads on this site, so in case ur 1 of them, might as well get specific.