#3
Does it HAVE to be between those two? I would get a bass with passive EMGs and an active preamp for your style.
#4
Don't suppose you'd be willing to look used? You'll get a way better instrument for your money. Also what amp are you currently using?
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
#5
Quote by consecutive e
Don't suppose you'd be willing to look used? You'll get a way better instrument for your money. Also what amp are you currently using?

I second these questions, especially the used one, there is much to be found on the used market.

If it has to be between the Jazz and the T-bird, definitely the Jazz. The T-bird Pro isn't as problematic as the regular Epi T-birds, but the Jazz will be be more versatile and more useful if you ever decide to stray from rock and metal.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#6
Quote by Knurlheim
Does it HAVE to be between those two? I would get a bass with passive EMGs and an active preamp for your style.

I just threw up a little bit.

If it has to between those too, Fender all the way man.
pinga
#7
Quote by Cb4rabid
I just threw up a little bit.

If it has to between those too, Fender all the way man.

whats wrong with passive EMG's i have an ibanez exb-445 with passive EMG pups and it friggin rocks.

@OP i would go for the jazz, far more versatile and all around better choice.
#8
They're absolutely freaking horrible. My world turns gray when I hear them, just no color.

I think everybody here would say the jazz bass over the crapiphone.
pinga
#9
i play through a line 6 LD15 practice amp, but when i play with my band we play in a studio so i get to play through a different 100w amps every time and in gigs the owners of the place provide amplifiers and monitors..

the thunderbird has neck through construction and active pups which is better right?
#10
Quote by amrkamel99

the thunderbird has neck through construction and active pups which is better right?


Not really, no. They're a preference thing. Neck through gives you a little more sustain, or some people would say that anyway. As far as I see it, it just means you have a lump of glue getting in the way of the wood. Bolt-on necks tend to have a bit more bite/snap to them.

As for active pickups, it's also preference. It's more knobs to have to mess with on your bass, and essentially isn't doing anything that your amp shouldn't be able to do anyway. I've always preferred passive myself, active electronics seem to homogenise instruments, but it's each to his own.

Besides, bare in mind that the Thunderbird is going to have a muddy unclear tone and neck dive like nobody's business.
#11
Quote by Ziphoblat
Not really, no. They're a preference thing. Neck through gives you a little more sustain, or some people would say that anyway. As far as I see it, it just means you have a lump of glue getting in the way of the wood. Bolt-on necks tend to have a bit more bite/snap to them.

As for active pickups, it's also preference. It's more knobs to have to mess with on your bass, and essentially isn't doing anything that your amp shouldn't be able to do anyway. I've always preferred passive myself, active electronics seem to homogenise instruments, but it's each to his own.

Besides, bare in mind that the Thunderbird is going to have a muddy unclear tone and neck dive like nobody's business.

I'd be willing to bet my right nut that Fender isn't going to be a one piece body. As for the muddy tone, I can't say I've personally played a T-Pro but on paper it seems a lot different to the IV. Mahogany wings instead of alder, and then the maple/walnut NT along with the active pre make it sound like you'd be able to dial in some pretty decent tones with this thing, I've been looking at one myself.
The neck dive... For christ's sake why didn't they put the strap button behind the neck like the Gibsons? They had the perfect chance to right one of their more obvious wrongs and they completely blew it.

Quote by amrkamel99
i play through a line 6 LD15 practice amp, but when i play with my band we play in a studio so i get to play through a different 100w amps every time and in gigs the owners of the place provide amplifiers and monitors..

the thunderbird has neck through construction and active pups which is better right?

Active preamp and passive pickups if I remember correctly. Personally I think you'd be better off with a new amp so you can find a consistent tone you like rather than going from amp to amp. But if you're dead set on a new bass start looking for used Warwick Corvettes, Spector Rebops, Lakland Skylines, G&Ls, even Ibanez BTBs if that kind of thing floats your boat.
Basses:
Fender Precision Bass
Fender Jazz Bass
1967 Fender Coronado Bass II
Warwick Star Bass
Squier Precision Bass TB
Last edited by consecutive e at Sep 24, 2010,