#2
all of them!?

if you know giant steps you will know that it modulates every freakin bar

get the chart and find the changes
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#3
Quote by Tominator_1991
all of them!?

if you know giant steps you will know that it modulates every freakin bar

get the chart and find the changes

That seems quite difficult...

I'll try my best, but to make it easier, I'll use snippets of my own solo and Coltrane's solo.
#4
Look at the lead sheet.
for tonic major chords scales play Ionian (for non-tonic major chords play lydian), for minor dorian (unless its the relative minor, then aeolian would work, or if its a ii-V to a minor key where you'd want harmonic minor) and for dominant play mixolydian (you can also use a dominant diminished scale--a half/whole diminished scale starting a half step above the root).
The problem with doing this with giant steps is that the changes go by way to fast, try to connect chord tones by stepwise motion when with this tune and practice arpegiating the changes and running digital patterns through the progression (like 1-3-5-7, 1-2-3-5 1-3-4-5 2-3-4-5 1-3-5-6 etc).

EDIT: or you can slow it down ALOT (a la pat metheny) and start working with chord scales.
#5
Giant Steps, if I remember correctly, goes between Eb Major, G Major, and B Major every bar or so. The progressions are simple: ii - V - I in Eb; ii - V - I in G; ii - V - I in B. The problem lies with how fast it is. I think the key changes every two bars, but the tempo is so ridiculously high that it happens very fast.

I would recommend slowing it down and playing completely in key until you begin to just "feel" the nuances of the song, and "feel" the key changing underneath you. It'll take some time, no doubt (it's a VERY hard song to solo over), but it you get those changes just right it'll sound amazing.

HINT: Look for the 3rd of the "ii" chord in every key as it's changing. It's actually a good habit to look for (and land on preferably) the 3rd of every chord, but that's not always as fun ;]
#6
Thanks for the help everybody, I'm going to study this song more before I work with the solo.
#7
Quote by TMF128
That seems quite difficult...

I'll try my best, but to make it easier, I'll use snippets of my own solo and Coltrane's solo.



is this the 1st jazz tune you've ever tried soloing over? If so, I'd highly recommend working on other songs 1st.
shred is gaudy music
#8
Quote by GuitarMunky
is this the 1st jazz tune you've ever tried soloing over? If so, I'd highly recommend working on other songs 1st.

Yes, this is the first song I am working with. I just got into jazz.
#9
Quote by TMF128
Yes, this is the first song I am working with. I just got into jazz.


I see. A very common mistake. Everyone goes for Giant Steps right away.

But seriously, I wouldn't bother with it for now. I mean its a great tune and Coltranes performance is amazing, but you have to be realistic. You're simply not going to be blowing over those changes competently any time soon.

I guess the one benefit you'll get is a 1st time exposure. (which is never a bad thing) After that though, I would start with easier, more realistic tunes and work you're way back up to it gradually.

If you're serious about getting into jazz, a teacher and/or class would probably be your best bet.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 25, 2010,
#10
I don't mean to be rude, but I am going to be straight with you. You don't know what you are doing yet. Stop. It's like an 8 year old stepping on the court and asking how to dunk, Jordan-style before they can dribble.

If you want to learn Jazz, master theory and then start on simple ii V and ii V I and arpeggios over each chord in the ii V I. Do something like Satin Doll, the first 4 bars. If you don't understand that Jazz changes keys sometimes every bar, walk away until you do so, and then instead of learning by rote, you know what you are doing. Playing Giant Steps ISNT to copy Coltrane.

To play Jazz, you must understand ii V I otherwise you're a parrot. A Parrot simply copies without knowing what they are saying.

Best,

Sean
#11
Quote by Sean0913
I don't mean to be rude, but I am going to be straight with you. You don't know what you are doing yet. Stop. It's like an 8 year old stepping on the court and asking how to dunk, Jordan-style before they can dribble.

If you want to learn Jazz, master theory and then start on simple ii V and ii V I and arpeggios over each chord in the ii V I. Do something like Satin Doll, the first 4 bars. If you don't understand that Jazz changes keys sometimes every bar, walk away until you do so, and then instead of learning by rote, you know what you are doing. Playing Giant Steps ISNT to copy Coltrane.

To play Jazz, you must understand ii V I otherwise you're a parrot. A Parrot simply copies without knowing what they are saying.

Best,

Sean


Best way to start off - kick Giant steps off, save it for a later date. Start with say, Tune Up or Solar
Quote by BlitzkriegAir
1. Get drunk
2. play pentatonic scales fast
3. throw in some divebombs and pinch harmonics
4. Get killed onstage
5. become legendary guitarist instantaneously


Quote by Holy Katana

How dare you attack the greatness of the augmented sixth?
#12
I'd start with a simple 12-bar blues, learning how to play over blues changes (and not just using pentatonics or a blues scale), actually using guide tones, enclosures, arpeggios, and practicing a ii V I at the turnaround before you start AABA form jazz tunes. Even the most basic jazz tunes are almost always 1 chord per bar at the least. Sometimes you'll see every 2 bars, but one per bar and two per bar are much more common. With blues, you learn the basics (again, if you do more than just pentatonics and blues scales) while having 1, 2, and 4 chords per bar. If blues really isn't your think, try a tune like cantaloupe island, it's got slow changes but you can still practice jazz over it. Perfect for a beginner.
#13
when i get someone who want to study giant steps..i ask that they know diatonic harmony very well...and have a extensive jazz song list and know how to improvise in as many keys as possible...

it should be a separate jazz study of what is possible..or impossible...

i break the piece down in small but intense sections

the first five bars...five notes / five chords / five chord tones

F# D B G Bb / BM7 D7/9 GM7 Bb7 EbM7 / 7 5 3 1 b3

notes: the first four notes are a GM7 arpeggio then the minor 3rd note
the Major chords are a major 3rd apart - this is the essential flavor of the piece
play the chord tone sequence for each chord...
play the chords in as many positions on the neck as possible
note how close the three major chords are to each other in each position--
--within each major 7 chord is the major triad and a minor triad a major third higher - GMaj & Bmi

do this exercise VERY slowly before playing the rest of the tune...when you feel you have the feel under your fingers .. increase tempo very gradually...

play well

wolf
Last edited by wolflen at Sep 27, 2010,