#1
Like it's said in the title, lots of tracks, because I am the sole musician on this project.
Tracks:
Alto Sax
Tenor Sax
Lead Guitar (Acoustic Gibson L-5)
Rhythm Guitar (Acoustic Gibson L-5)
Bass Guitar (Electric)
Piano
MAYBE a Steel Guitar Track.

So thats 6 or 7 tracks per song. Now, which Microphone/Computer Program should I get? I know what to get for everything else, but I'm making a Home Studio for a few Demos to showcase my multi-instrumentalism.
Guitars:
Greg Bennett Avion AV-3

Amps:
Fender Frontman 25r
Sundown 15w

Chain:
Guitar>Boss Distortion>Amp

Keepin' it simple!
#2
I'm certainly no recording expert, but generally it's not a one-mic-fits-all solution. Recording studios will select different mics for different guitars and different vocalists. You'll probably want something along the lines of a Shure SM57 for the acoustic, unless you go direct into a recording interface. For vocals, you can go condenser mic, or Shure SM58, or similar. There are some free recording programs available, but I've never used them. I use a Tascam US-2000 recording interface (USB2) with Cubase. The Tascam will accept guitar inputs or mic, which makes it great for recording multi-track stuff. The Cubase DAW software is multi-track, so it complements the Tascam.
#3
Well, if you read, I have one guitar (two tracks), no vocals, and a keyboard (non electric), and two wind instrument. So this is a case of acoustic recording from a mic straight into an interface into a computer. So MAYBE two mics, for the guitar and piano, and one for the horns. But I don't need a vocals mic, and I don't have the ability to plug anything in.
Guitars:
Greg Bennett Avion AV-3

Amps:
Fender Frontman 25r
Sundown 15w

Chain:
Guitar>Boss Distortion>Amp

Keepin' it simple!
#4
Quote by ibanezaf75trs
Well, if you read, I have one guitar (two tracks), no vocals, and a keyboard (non electric), and two wind instrument. So this is a case of acoustic recording from a mic straight into an interface into a computer. So MAYBE two mics, for the guitar and piano, and one for the horns. But I don't need a vocals mic, and I don't have the ability to plug anything in.

If you plan on making quality music, you need the ability to plug in at least one mic/line input.
Recording a piano and getting an excellent sound will require one or more high-end condenser mics, but I suppose a SM57 could be used, but do not expect a studio-quality sound. Recording guitar and woodwind instruments can be achieved with a single Shure SM57. That microphone is your best bet, as it is very versatile and can cover anything from vocals to loud guitar amplifiers.
At the bare minimum, you will be spending about $100+ on a USB or FireWire audio interface, and $100+ on microphones. There is no other way around that unfortunately.
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
You'll probably want something along the lines of a Shure SM57 for the acoustic, unless you go direct into a recording interface.

actually, you wouldnt. while the sm57 is a very good first mic, it is not at all what i would recomend for an acoustic. ive used it on acoustic, and it doesnt really do it justice. i would rather use a condensor or two. the mxl 990/991 combo is an excellent choice for acoustics on a budget.

next, 6 or 7 tracks for a song is not a lot. i often do more than that of just guitars. thats besides the point. anyway, grab a 2 channel interface. not sure what you were planning on getting, but for acoustics and pianos i find that 2 mics is the way to go. im not really a piano or brass kinda guy, so im not sure what to recomend for those. but on a budget, the mxl 990/991 pack is great for acoustics and could probably do the others ok-ish.

software wise, well depends on what you want. i personally like reaper. its cheap, a great daw, and i find it very usable. cubase is another popular option. pro tools seems like a bit of a waste for entry level stuff, but it is a very good program.