#1
Hey, I'm in a band where the rhythm guitarist just seems to play powerchords. The bassisst, singer and I have decided to try and introducing to harmonising melodies. Trouble is, we have no idea where to start :L

If you guys could help by recommending some harmonising guitar riffs that would be great, but we'd like to try and keep the tuning in E/D#. Thanks

P.s Kicking him out of the band is a last resort so please dont mention it.
#3
Theory - you both need to learn it.

Learn where the notes are on your guitars, learn about intervals then learn how to put a few of them together to create the major scales. That's your fondation for learning harmony, it's not something you can understand without that underpinning knowledge in place.

Josh Urban's crusade articles in the columns section area good place to start.
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#4
Well powerchords are just the root and 5th of larger chords - usually straight minor or major ones. So you could try extending them and seeing how it goes.

A simple example is Green Day's "When I Come Around". The chord progression goes;

F#5 C#5 D#5 B5

But the vocals use the major scale, which imply a major key. It resolves to F# so the song is in F# major. Therefore if you wished to extend the chords as such, the actual chord progression is;

F# major, C#major, D# minor, B major
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#6
You could also try to use your ear to harmonise. Just play a different note that sounds good with the original one.

You really don't need to learn theory just to harmonise a riff... It might help maybe, but if you have a good ear you can do it just like that.
#7
first tell him what chords are in what scales, and everytime you play a lead melody for a song, explain to him what scale/key its in and what scale degrees are emphasized etc. then he should be able to choose the chords which best harmonize it.
#8
Quote by steven seagull
Theory - you both need to learn it.

Learn where the notes are on your guitars, learn about intervals then learn how to put a few of them together to create the major scales. That's your foundation for learning harmony, it's not something you can understand without that underpinning knowledge in place.

Josh Urban's crusade articles in the columns section area good place to start.


This is really the best answer. There's not much that we can say in one post (this is the case with most questions here). Theory is a complicated subject for most people, so I'd recommend both the aforementioned Crusades and musictheory.net. It can help to see the same thing explained in different ways. Ideally your knowledge of theory should grow to be intuitive, not textbook.
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