#1
how is it done? how do you get that super glossy look that guitars from factories recieve. i've done my first three coats with the guitar hung up, and i get runs, and paint brush marks. i suppose i'll do the last coat laying face down for each side, but when i do that, how do i get it ABSOLUTELY PERFECT? please help UG!
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#2
There's no way you can achieve the gloss you're looking for without wet-sanding the guitar when you're done finishing it. There are some good tutorials online.
#3
u can get a sponge brush, and u have to sand it a little
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#4
Apply final coat. Wait at least 5 days for it to cure (a week is best).
Wet sand the blemishes out and then buff it to a high gloss.
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#5
define "wet sanding" i have been using ultra fine sand paper in between each coat.. and should i use a different brush? i'm using a foam one.
Member of The 7 String Legion


Peavey Triple X Head
Mahieu 4x12 Cab (celestion g12t-75)
Gibson Vixen
Schecter C-1 Classic
Various Pedals, and Guitars.
#6
You need waterproof sandpaper, then get a bucket of warm water, some people put dish soap in it. Then you dip the sandpaper in the water and sand with it. The water basically prevents any clogging and keeps the surface lubricated which allows you to get a flat finish.
[quote="'[BurnTheDusk"]']Better than my plan, look at those perfect little dick suckin' lips!
Kid's a natural I tell yah!Orange Rockerverb 50 MKII
Marshall JCM 900 SL-X
Gibson Les Paul Studio Faded
Fender Mexican Standard Telecaster
Hey I built a guitar
#7
When I paint anything, cars or guitars, I don't sand in between coats. You don't need too. I usually put one somewhat light coat, then after about 15 minutes a little heavier. Keep doing that for about 3-4 coats, and on the last one put on pretty heavy.

It it runs its no that huge of a deal. Unless it runs down the entire guitar or something. Its better to have a little more clear coat the not enough.

Then after about a week at least the you can try to start wet sanding. I usually start with 1200 and end with 2000. Then I grab the car buffer and buff it out.
***Guitars***
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#8
Quote by the1967mustang
When I paint anything, cars or guitars, I don't sand in between coats. You don't need too. I usually put one somewhat light coat, then after about 15 minutes a little heavier. Keep doing that for about 3-4 coats, and on the last one put on pretty heavy.

It it runs its no that huge of a deal. Unless it runs down the entire guitar or something. Its better to have a little more clear coat the not enough.

Then after about a week at least the you can try to start wet sanding. I usually start with 1200 and end with 2000. Then I grab the car buffer and buff it out.



what would you do if you had runs in the finish? how do you fix it?
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Gibson Vixen
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Various Pedals, and Guitars.
#9
^ Do you mean run in the actually paint? The color? In that case, you have to sand it out until the run is out, either to primer or wood, and refinish it. The paint is different when you run it, you have to redo it. Hope that helps.
***Guitars***
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#10
Quote by the1967mustang
^ Do you mean run in the actually paint? The color? In that case, you have to sand it out until the run is out, either to primer or wood, and refinish it. The paint is different when you run it, you have to redo it. Hope that helps.



no, i mean the clearcoat. there is runs on the side of the guitar and it looks like drips of plastic..
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Various Pedals, and Guitars.
#12
Get a rattle can next time, its much much easier to do a good job. After its primed and painted I spray 3 coats, 3 times in a similar manner to what 67crustang () said, except I do sand with 320 or 400 between the three sets of coats. I usually wait probably 5-10 between coats and let it cure a few days before I sand it and do the next set of clear. After the last set I let it sit a week or week and a half and do the final wet sanding and buffing. I start with 400 and go through 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and in the future will use 1500 and maybe 2000. After that I use a fine cut polish and hand polish it (I seem to do a better job with that over my buffer) and use a swirl remover to finish it off. Looks like a ****in mirror! And I just use normal rustoleum lacquer.
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#13
Can you paint on a binding? I always wondered how they do binding on the body...
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#14
Quote by xstillspinninx
Get a rattle can next time, its much much easier to do a good job. After its primed and painted I spray 3 coats, 3 times in a similar manner to what 67crustang () said, except I do sand with 320 or 400 between the three sets of coats. I usually wait probably 5-10 between coats and let it cure a few days before I sand it and do the next set of clear. After the last set I let it sit a week or week and a half and do the final wet sanding and buffing. I start with 400 and go through 600, 800, 1000, 1200, and in the future will use 1500 and maybe 2000. After that I use a fine cut polish and hand polish it (I seem to do a better job with that over my buffer) and use a swirl remover to finish it off. Looks like a ****in mirror! And I just use normal rustoleum lacquer.


Do you wait a couple of days in between coats of clear? I spray all coats in about 30 minutes to an hour, with no sanding in between. And do you use 320 it the clear? If it turns out good, then by all means do it like that. I have always been taught not to use anything lower that 1200 on clear because the scratches are to deep, and you would have to take too much clear off to get them out.

Like I said though, if it turns out good and looks like a mirror, thats the main goal. Doesn't matter how you do it as long as it turns out good.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
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#15
True, there's got to be plenty of ways to do a good job. I used 220 for leveling the primer I think, 320 between the coats of black (I think I did 1x, 2x, 2x in that), and 320 after the first set of coats of clear, but went to 400 after that. I do take a couple days between, and I guess the only reason is because I didn't know you can shoot all them on at once, and I read somewhere that if you scuff the paint up after it dries before you put on subsequent coats it will stick a bit better. I do spray 3 coats like you do, wait a couple days (more until I have more time than anything else), scuff it, 3 more coats, etc. I did have a bit of orange peel to take off when I started the polishing, and it seemed to take forever to do with the 600, which is why I like 400 for the initial clear leveling. Being that you paint cars though, I bet you have a bit better equipment, experience, and probably results than my $4 can of Rustoleum Lacquer and relatively limited paint experience. What kind of spray setup do you have? I have a decent enough air compressor back home to run a spray gun for a guitar, and I plan to get a gun after I get some more inlay tools.
Chain:
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Last edited by xstillspinninx at Sep 27, 2010,
#16
Well we have a lot of painting equipment, like paint guns, (gravity and siphon feed) a couple big air compressors and the works. But I just use spray cans of paint from O'Riellys for most my projects.

When I spray all my clear on at one time, the reason it sticks is because I give it enough time to start to set up, that way it is tacky and the next coat sticks to it. If you don't give it enough time to set up, then you get to much paint on and it runs. But like I said, if your guitars look good when their done, then that is the way you should do it. All that matters is if it looks good.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)
#17
Quote by the1967mustang
Well we have a lot of painting equipment, like paint guns, (gravity and siphon feed) a couple big air compressors and the works. But I just use spray cans of paint from O'Riellys for most my projects.

When I spray all my clear on at one time, the reason it sticks is because I give it enough time to start to set up, that way it is tacky and the next coat sticks to it. If you don't give it enough time to set up, then you get to much paint on and it runs. But like I said, if your guitars look good when their done, then that is the way you should do it. All that matters is if it looks good.


You CAN, pile on the clear as you described, if you aren't using 2k. If you a re using 2k, then 3 coats (passes), then need to cure overnight at 70F or be baked on at about 140F.

Then you need to sand the clear, with (P600 for me if it isn't a flow coat), to ensure bonding.

So you are both right, but for different reasons...other than no, I wouldn't do 320 between coats...400-600.

That and P1200 (not CAMI 1200) is too fine for in between coats of clear.

Runs in the clear.

If you notice a run while painting, ideally DON'T touch it. You do want to avoid a large run with bubbles in it, as they will go all of the way down to the next layer (BAD), so if you can do something with the tip of a cloth, touching only the surface of the run and not the surface you are painting, to reduce the run...do so.

They always take longer to cure or dry than the rest of the clear, so leave well alone for a week after everything is dry.

Then you take a sharp razor, and slice off the worst of it, then, make a "Run File" by gluing some P600 or P800 to a lolly (popsicle) stick or similar, and sand the run down flush with the rest of the surface.

Hopefully you can now understand why bubbles are bad, you cant file out a bubble as it leaves a mark. You can, drop fill it after doing the above, with a fine brush and drip the clear into the hole. Then let it dry and treat as a normal run.
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Last edited by Skeet UK at Sep 27, 2010,
#18
I have use a rag for applying arm-a-seal. less drips. Make sure that when you are done, you don't throw the rag in the trash can or ball it up or else your house will burn down.

you still have to wet sand.
#19
Not saying that anyone is wrong here, but I have always been taught, (at least on cars), that if you have to quit in the middle of clear coating, you should use a product like 222 Mid-Coat Adhesion promoter before you continue painting. No sanding. The adhesion promoter gives is the tackiness that it needs to continue the clear coating.

One of my teachers told us never to sand clear coat with anything lower that 1200, at the lowest 1000. The razor blade does help a lot, I have done that a couple of times after it dries pretty much completely. If you take your time and just scrape it for a while till its flat, your good.

That is just one way of doing it. There are many ways, but that was the ASE Certified way. Their ways aren't always the best way though.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)
#20
Quote by the1967mustang
Not saying that anyone is wrong here, but I have always been taught, (at least on cars), that if you have to quit in the middle of clear coating, you should use a product like 222 Mid-Coat Adhesion promoter before you continue painting. No sanding. The adhesion promoter gives is the tackiness that it needs to continue the clear coating.

One of my teachers told us never to sand clear coat with anything lower that 1200, at the lowest 1000. The razor blade does help a lot, I have done that a couple of times after it dries pretty much completely. If you take your time and just scrape it for a while till its flat, your good.

That is just one way of doing it. There are many ways, but that was the ASE Certified way. Their ways aren't always the best way though.


You have to remember, that when talking about grits, there are the CAMI grade papers, common in the USA and the FEPA graded P Papers, more common in Europe.

P papers have more uniform grit and are used by people like Jon Kosmoski, of House of Kolor...who's methods I follow.

So when I talk about P600-P800, that is about the same as USA 400 grit.

I only use HOK paints and as such, there is no need for an adhesion promoter between coats of clear. My own finishes and those of Jon Kosmoski, are testament to that.

CAMI 1200 grit is equivalent to P2500, which is the very last grit one would use, before bringing out the compound and rotary! This is not a good basis for subsequent clear coats, and as such...is probably why you need an adhesion promoter to melt the previous clear. Why add another product, possibly by an alternate manufacturer, between your clears?

Of course, if that is how you were taught...then this will of course come naturally to you.

However, I must stress how VERY different the automotive/refinishing ways of doing things are, in comparison to Custom Paint procedures.

Standard refinishing, is only designed to cope with paint thickness in the 5-8 mill range, whereas custom paint, with multiple layers for artwork, can extend to 15-20 mills, where normal paint would simply de-laminate.

It is much quicker (and time is money in automotive refinishing) to spray adhesion promoter over your freshly bakes clear, than wet sand the whole car.

This is how they spray 3-5 cars a day, with a "pleasing" finish.

This gun stock, has 4 coats of primer (guide coated, levelled etc) 3 coats of black base, 1 layer of artistic base (marbelizer), 3 coats of intercoat. 3 coats of Candy blue followed by 9 coats of 2k Urethane clear.



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Last edited by Skeet UK at Sep 27, 2010,
#21
You really know your stuff! I didn't realize there would be that much difference in procedures. And what you said about the custom painting vs automotive painting is dead on, now that i think about it. Most cars are Primer/sealer, base coat, clear coat. Cars don't usually have designs in the paint, so there isn't as much steps and is a different process.

The guitars that I have painted I have painted just like automobiles. I sanded the old paint with 320, prepped it, base'd it, then cleared straight over it. Gave it about a weeks to dry and did the wet sanding. Turns out real good IMO. But of coarse, there are other ways that are probably better, but this works best for me as of right now.
***Guitars***
Epiphone Les Paul Custom AP (w/ 2 Seymour Duncans)
Jackson Dx10D Dinky (w/ DiMarzio PAF Bridge)
Epihpone Hummingbird

***Amps***
Marshall JCM 2000 DSL 100 (Voodoo Modified)
Custom 4x12 Halfstack (w/ Veteran 30's)