#1
I'm thinking about building my own guitar, but it would be my first build, so I'm not entirely sure about some stuff. I'm comfortable enough with wood work, but there's still some things with the actual work I would like some info on, as well as some other things.

1) Roughly, how much a build cost? I would need to buy all the tools required as well, so how much would they cost?

2) What tools will I need?

3) How hard would it be to do all the work myself, or it would it be better just to be better to buy a pre-built neck/fingerboard/etc.?

4) Where would I be able to be able to get templates for body shapes? Free handing it seems like a REALLY bad idea, and I don't own any body shapes I'm thinking about doing.


Answers to those would be much appreciated. Many thanks.
#2
Quote by robhc
I'm thinking about building my own guitar, but it would be my first build, so I'm not entirely sure about some stuff. I'm comfortable enough with wood work, but there's still some things with the actual work I would like some info on, as well as some other things.

1) Roughly, how much a build cost? I would need to buy all the tools required as well, so how much would they cost?

2) What tools will I need?

3) How hard would it be to do all the work myself, or it would it be better just to be better to buy a pre-built neck/fingerboard/etc.?

4) Where would I be able to be able to get templates for body shapes? Free handing it seems like a REALLY bad idea, and I don't own any body shapes I'm thinking about doing.


Answers to those would be much appreciated. Many thanks.


Firstly, I'm assuming you are talking about electric guitars. Acoustics are a bitch to build... so read this: http://www.instructables.com/id/Build-Your-Own-Electric-Guitar!/
These are very good instructions. In there it has a tools list and overall cost too.

Secondly, free-handing it isn't actually as bad as one would think. As long as you're an accurate drawer, have a passably steady hand and are prepared to sand/plane/file for a good while, you'll be fine.

And lastly, buy your own neck. Because they really are the mother of all ****s to get right. If you're out by even a millimetre on the frets and don't realise it, the neck is as good as a write off. Honestly, it's not worth the hassle. Maybe try it a few builds in, deffo not on your first though.

Hope this helps,
Adam
Quote by Duv
The only good thing about my MG30 was I was able to have it in my room for 5 years solely as a place to hide cigarettes and condoms.
#3
fourthly, if you look in the GB&C resources hub you'll find the starter pack which has body shapes in it. you can then print it out and use it as a guide.
dude above me pretty much said it all. i would definetly buy a neck instead of build one. and buying all the tools could be costly. however, if you have a family friend or neighbour with the power tools needed, that could save you alot of time and alot of effort and alot of money.
also, welcome to building good luck
#4
1) Cost will depend a lot of what you are using for hardware, electronics, wood, and tools.
My first guitar, I went for EMG's with gold hardware, mahogany body, flamed maple top, and had no guitar specific tools.

My second guitar, I went for ash body, maple neck, GFS pickups, and a decent but not too crazy expensive bridge. There was probably about 700-8-- in the first, while maybe only about 500 in the second.

2) tools can vary, routers are extremely useful, as well as some sort of power drill, drill press is best, but that's asking quite a bit. And for the neck, rasps and files are good. Bandsaws are also very useful, or other power saws that can handle hardwoods. also, sanders, random orbital, belt, oscillating/spindle sanders are very useful, although not necessary.

then there is just planers and jointers which are for flattening and squaring wood, both of which can be done creatively with a router if need be.

3) There honestly isn't a ton of work in building a guitar if you have everything planned out. A lot of the work is in the neck, so if you don't feel comfortable, it may be a better alternative to buy one pre-built.

4)
For templates, other than what has been stated, and the template thread that is linked in the essential links thread, find a picture of the guitar shape, measure the scale length, bridge, or other known length as what it is in the picture, then do :

Actual Length on Real Guitar ÷
Length of that Measurement on paper

Then multiply it by 100 to get a percent over 100. That is what you will set a copier to then copy the image and line them up again to get a full size guitar. Then just trace it onto plywood, MDF, or some other cheap wood, cut it out, and sand.


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