#1
Not sure if this is the right place, sorry in advance.

I'm just trying to get a feel of what techniques, scales, chords, and anything else I should know in order to get the same vibe as some of the bands I listen to. The mix of the really heavy chugs to the more airy arpeggios. Any suggestions guys?

I would like to compose similar music to Red Sparowes, Explosions In The Sky, and a little less so of ISIS , Godspeed You! Black Emperor and Sigur Ros. But Red Sparowes seems to really capture everything I'd like to be able to do.

I have the basic equipment (in sig) I feel for this type of music. I just don't know musically what to do.

Red Sparowes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5ZuL2e02ls&feature=related

Explosions In The Sky: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JzIK5FaC38w
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2006 PRS CE-24
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#2
How about learning a bunch of songs from those bands you listed, figure out the commonalities and what you like, then applying that to your writing.
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#3
Techniques? Trem picking. That's about it in terms of non-basic stuff. I assume you already know how to use your E-bow well enough. You should know basic theory (but that goes for any type of music). So basic diatonic scales and knowledge of chord construction and harmonies in general. The chugs are easy. Straight down picking with an OD or something like that running.

The rest is really up to your own creativity. That's why post-rock is such an umbrella term. Sigur Ros, GY!BE, EITS and Pelican are all very, very different bands, but still fall under post-rock in some way or another. Experiment with long delay times and huge reverbs. Put your Big Muff all the way up and mess with your wah and just make some noise.
#4
I thought I'd get a stright up answer, but that, as simple as it sounds, helps. Seems like its the droning repitive bass notes, with a simple chord progression, and some arpeggios on top?

EDIT: Didn't see you at time of the post, but thank you Avedas, I know its asking a lot. I just dont know where to start. Theres some dark stuff that starts at about 6:06 of my link, but I don't know what it is.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
Last edited by AWACS at Sep 27, 2010,
#5
Quote by AWACS
I thought I'd get a stright up answer, but that, as simple as it sounds, helps. Seems like its the droning repitive bass notes, with a simple chord progression, and some arpeggios on top?


Sure, sounds good to me.

Analysing the songs you like theoretically would help a lot though. A "simple" chord progression may consist of a couple of chords which say, are uncommon in pop music.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6


and a looper pedal.
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#7
Quote by AWACS
I thought I'd get a stright up answer, but that, as simple as it sounds, helps. Seems like its the droning repitive bass notes, with a simple chord progression, and some arpeggios on top?

EDIT: Didn't see you at time of the post, but thank you Avedas, I know its asking a lot. I just dont know where to start. Theres some dark stuff that starts at about 6:06 of my link, but I don't know what it is.


Well, that'll work, for sure. But it's not really formulaic (despite so many bands in the genre also sounding the same). EITS layers 3 guitars most of the time. One or two may be doing simple rhythmic work, but analyze further and take note of all the harmonies going on at the same time. First Breath After Coma utilizes quite a bit of panning and delay between two of the lead tracks.

Assuming you're referring to the Red Sparowes link, it's just an arpeggio with what sounds like some sort of tremolo on it. I wouldn't try starting with something so elaborate. Create a structure and work up from it until you're more comfortable with chord voicings and making melodies within them.
#8
Ok, yes, my bad, simple may have been the wrong word for it. I really like the Red Sparowes link I put up, "Buildings Began To Stretch Wide Across The Sky, And The Air Filled With A Reddish Glow". Help on analyzing that would be very nice.

I suppose a loop pedal would help a lot too, eh?

So, just throwing something out there, maybe get a bassline going with the ebow, possibly some "chugging" or like 8th note chord rhythms which fit the bassline, and then arpeggios over that? I'm not sure if I could do that though...Maybe like Eb tuning for a little "darker" sound? I know its the internet, and I cant really convey my ideas very well.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
Last edited by AWACS at Sep 27, 2010,
#9
I've found that a huge portion of post-rock is in 6/8 time. Also, there are almost always tremolo picked simple melodies over what would be the "chorus" or peak of the song. Also, it's almost always diatonic (major or minor scale). I've also found that when arpeggiating chords, it helps to have a second guitar strumming chords underneath, but only strumming once per chord (aka let those suckers ring and turn the reverb to 11!). Also, whenever playing arpeggios or melodies or whathaveyou (assuming it's making up the brunt of the song at that point), I find it is quite common to have a single droning note or a simple melody picked in 8th notes with each note filling one or more measures. Also, when you get to the peak of a song it never hurts to have a guitar bashing away some power chords or sus2 chords (ie. 579xxx or 557xxx in Drop tunings) with nice heavy, fuzzy distortion (but still rather low in the mix), while another guitar tremolo picks the shit out of the diatonic major or minor scale (ascending) and another guitar with heavy delay and reverb plays complementary melodies and/or arpeggios. Hope that helps. Also, I'm currently halfway through tabbing From Roots To Needles by If These Trees Could Talk, so PM me if you want the tabs as is or if you want me to finish and post them.
#10
Quote by canvasDude
Post.


Thank you, this helps a lot. Kind of what I was thinking, just couldnt put it down. And I haven't heard of the band, but yeah, I'll take a look at the tab, and the song.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#11
Glad I could be of help. Also, the biggest help you'll find is learning as many songs as you can by your favorite post-rock bands, and thinking about how each note at any given moment interacts with any other note and the chords beneath it to make it sound how it does. After learning several songs and writing some of your own mimicing the style and sound of them, you'll have a really good understanding of what makes post-rock sound the way it does, and how you can do the same. Also, if you haven't already, you'll definitely want to learn as much theory as you can. It truly helps in ways you can't possibly imagine otherwise.
#12
The only thing I can contribute that hasn't already been said is that maj7s and riffs based of of maj7s seem really common.
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#13
As far as I can tell, there's no significant favoring of Major or Minor tonality. Maybe a bit more Major, but whatever. So don't feel like you need to stick to either one (some people make this mistake). Also, simple counter melodies are often used. 9/10 (exaggeration) they make use of minor second interval ringing across two strings. Especially effective in a major tonality.
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#14
Quote by Eastwinn
As far as I can tell, there's no significant favoring of Major or Minor tonality. Maybe a bit more Major, but whatever. So don't feel like you need to stick to either one (some people make this mistake). Also, simple counter melodies are often used. 9/10 (exaggeration) they make use of minor second interval ringing across two strings. Especially effective in a major tonality.


Sorry, not that great at musical theory. This would mean...what?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

Current Rig:
2006 PRS CE-24
Mesa/Boogie Mark V
Voltage S212 w/ V30's
Strymon Timeline
CMATMods Signa Drive
TC Electronics Corona & Hall of Fame
#15
diatonic harmony, fairly simple progressions (or sometimes modal-ish sections), simple melodies with accompaniment that layer upon each other to build to a climax. The tension and release moves away from tonic-dominant resolution to focusing on texture (though tonic-dominant resolution can often be part of it), moving from thick textures full of simple interlocking melodies to simple melodies that will later build, be deconstructed and build again. usually, once a theme is used and finished it does not come back (though sometimes it can). The music is often through composed, but there may be a chorus or refrain type section.
My analysis.
As far as guitaristic stuff goes
lots of reverb, clean tones with some distortion, some delay, lots of tremelo picking.
Btw, I've never heard of red sparowes, but I love that link you posted. I'm definatly going to check them out.
#16
I need to know how to play post offense better in basketball, because I generally fall in post situations all the time and I can't play post offense to save my life. I want to know how to get better on post offense..thanks