#1
if i have a piece of sheet music and its in A min the key signature will still be C Maj key signature no sharps no flats

likewise if i have music that is a Dorian progression the key signature will still be C Maj key
signature .

is this right ?
#2
no, it is just in A minor. It DOES have the same notes as C major, but is notated as A minor. This needs to stay consistent throughout the piece, just so the theory makes sense and is easiest to see.
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#3
Quote by gatechballer
no, it is just in A minor. It DOES have the same notes as C major, but is notated as A minor. This needs to stay consistent throughout the piece, just so the theory makes sense and is easiest to see.
What?

TS; C major, A minor, and D dorian all share the same key signature.
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#5
As someone who knows little about sheet music, is the reason that the key signature the same for all because the key signature merely prescribes which notes are in the signature, and not where they resolve to?
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#6
^ correct, where they resolve to is a part of music that is determined by the notes and their functions relative to each other within the musical piece.