#1
So, I searched the forum, but couldn't find anything about this. And, If you do find something, then, excuse me for opening this..

Well, I got this whole situation spinning around in my head for a loooong time.. Because people always try to learn, learn new stuff, become better in many things, there's a lot of theory for all that.

Now, the problem I have been thinking about for a long time, is music theory. All the theory around the music, the playing/making of music and more.

Everywhere (on the computer, in books, from other people) you can learn and find a lot about music and about the theory. But, if you want to be an awesome musician, do you have to know all the theory? The millions of pages of theory and all other information around music? Do you have to know all about music?

And, do great musicians like Slash and Jimmy Page know it all?

This has been going around in my head for a long time, and now is the time that I'm discovering it.. (I hope)
#3
Learning some theory can only help you. It makes improvising a lot easier when you know all of the scales too. However, it isn't necessary. As long as you can play shit that you like, it doesn't matter if you know the theory behind it.
#4
I think Page was a session musician so he probably knows quite a lot. No idea about Slash.

There are awesome musicians with no musical education or theoretical knowledge but they do know everything they need to, and they learned it the hard way - by themselves, using only their ears.
Recently, it's getting harder to become famous (because of the competition) and you probably don't have 8 hours a day to figure it all by yourself (without reading etc) so you make your chances quite bigger if you decide to learn theory. Also, it's getting harder to come up with fresh ideas if you don't know enough.

So, basically, you don't have to know everything but it makes your chances bigger and reduces the effort needed. Also, you have to have something that differs you from your competition. And it will get harder and harder to break through.
#5
There aren't many people, if any, that know everything about music. You don't need to know a ton of theory to be a good musician. But, if you want to evolve, then there is definitely a stronger need to learn more.
#6
There's no amount of theory you have to know in order to be a great musician. In fact a lot of great musicians know very little.

That said, SlashYourFug has it completely right, theory can only help you. Don't use the fact that many great musicians don't know much theory as an excuse to not learn theory. Check it out, I assure you, you will improve as a musician exponentially faster as you learn theory.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#7
Quote by PJ H
, if you want to be an awesome musician, do you have to know all the theory?
And, do great musicians like Slash and Jimmy Page know it all?


put simply..... NO.

I'm sure both of them know a thing or 2, but I doubt that they know, or are even concerned with knowing...... everything.


Quote by PJ H

This has been going around in my head for a long time, and now is the time that I'm discovering it.. (I hope)



I wouldn't worry about it. if you're interested in learning theory.... go for it.

suggestion.... learn to read standard notation 1st as preparation & have a healthy repertoire of songs.


Quote by food1010
There's no amount of theory you have to know in order to be a great musician. In fact a lot of great musicians know very little.


+ 1


Quote by food1010

theory can only help you. Don't use the fact that many great musicians don't know much theory as an excuse to not learn theory.


+ 1

Quote by food1010

Check it out, I assure you, you will improve as a musician exponentially faster as you learn theory.



For sure, though I'll put listening & playing music on your instrument at the top of the chain for quick improvement.
But I do agree with you, and the knowledge you gain from theory can make both of those tasks easier. Studying theory... understanding how the chords function..... helps your ear. it gives you some specific things to listen for and recognize..... and ultimately utilize.

Regarding "problems" with learning music theory...

In the quest to get good and do whats right in terms of learning theory I feel that alot of people end up straying away from listening and playing music in loo of the fancy words. Its not the fault of music theory, but there is a correlation IMO, and it's worth being aware of.
shred is gaudy music
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Sep 28, 2010,
#8
If you want to give music the best of yourself, you will learn it.

Quite simply , all it does is open doors.

That's all.

Do you want doors to open? Then learn it.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
#9
Okay, thank you for all the information! It helps alot!

But, I have got another question:

Everywhere online, you can find a million (or even more) sites and other stuff with lessons, theory and stuff. But, are all these things different, or are they all about the same things? I think it is annoying..
Last edited by PJ H at Sep 30, 2010,
#10
Quote by PJ H
Okay, thank you for all the information! It helps alot!

But, I have got another question:

Everywhere online, you can find a million (or even more) sites and other stuff with lessons, theory and stuff. But, are all these things different, or are they all about the same things? I think it is annoying..


Every one of them are basically the same thing packaged differently.

Mike Dodge has a great site which goes way more into it, and intelligently so, than any site out there I have ever been aware of...and for free.

I have a site (not free) that is different from anything else out there.

But for those two exceptions, everyone from Justin Sandercoe to Desi Cerna, they all basically teach the same thing. And most sites out there that I know of, might be fine for beginners, but almost none of them do a good job teaching theory beyond a very shallow, library book might do it. I'm personally familiar with JamPlay, Guitar Tricks, National Guitar Workshop and all of them suck on the theory side. JamPlay is a great site, and many of my students use it as an adjunct to our Academy program, because I don't teach things like "widdle widdle" licks, or styles or things just about every other music store can do...I teach mastery of theory and total understanding of the instrument, so for many, JP is a great place to get the cliche style studies and "widdle-widdle" stuff if they need it. I teach free improvisation, not licks. Guitar Tricks is a lot more dodgy in my opinion and National Guitar Workshop is in the middle, but well suited for total beginners.

Hope that helps. I'm not above recommending a site if it delivers as its promised.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 30, 2010,