#1
I want to go to school for music. I don't know if I want to major in Jazz Studies, Music Ed or Performance.

I know if I major in Music Ed I can become a teacher.

But if I major in Performance or Jazz Studies what can I do when I'm done with college? I just don't want to get out and be like "oh fu*k now what."
I play guitar.
#2
with performance or jazz studies you have a piece of paper that says you can play guitar real well.

That being said, you have all the perks of having a college degree (is you go to a college that is properly accredited, which you should as most good schools of music are and all the best are). You can get an entry level, shitty but salaried position just like someone with an english major. Music Ed and an MAT is the requirement to teach music in public schools, which is usually a position as a band, choir or orchestra director, so I'd suggest studying classical voice or a bowed string or wind instrument NOW so you have an easier time in methods classes/can specialize in one of those tracks (which you usually have to do in music ed). If you don't like working with kids, long hours and coaching beginners don't do music ed; you'll hate your life when you start teaching. With a performance or jazz degree (if you don't know jazz studies is a jazz performance degree, because at most schools performance denotes classical) you can teach privately and gig and spend all of your time in college mastering your instrument. A lot of schools also have dual emphasis programs (which lead to a BM performance/BME or BM performance/MAT in a 5 year sequence).
#3
If you're going to music school for a piece of paper and a job don't bother. Be an accounting major.

I'm a jazz studies major in school. I'm playing two weddings for $350 soon. Playing a musical for $1000. $100 for two hours of background music.

That easily pays for rent and utilities. In addition to my day job and lessons I teach I do well for myself. Want a steady income? Pick a different profession. And if you want to succeed be prepared to sacrifice relationships, a social life and relaxation.
#DTWD
Last edited by primusfan at Sep 28, 2010,
#4
^Basically.

If you aren't going to put 110% in, i wouldn't try it.

PS - If you can get through music school without loans, do it. If you can't, don't. I've gone to the state school for jazz studies, and Berklee for performance. I learned more at Berklee in 1 semester than i did in 2 years at the state school. You're better off learning on your own and getting gigs that way.
Quote by Guitardude19
The world is a fucked up place.


Tele's

"Oh I'll play the blues for you"
#5
With music school, DO NOT LOOK AT END RESULT.

That is to say, you either get to pick the journey , or the destination, not both.

Want a job with good money and respect? Be a skilled tradesmen or accountant.

Do you want to truly test yourself, sometimes not be able to pay bills, not afford to go out, using lots of weekend nights to either teach practice gig? Do you want to learn to self motivate yourself just for the sake of the pursuit and not for what's greener on the other side, with no guaranteed promise waiting?

That's what it means to choose music. Im not giving you scared tactics, because you know as well as I that's the reality. Just be honest there is no shame in wanted a secure life. But DO NOT try and force music to get you that sort of salaried with benefits feel. Chances are you will be able to do it somehow (teacher?) but if you don't feeling a calling to teaching it will be much worse than medical school.


Quote by primusfan
If you're going to music school for a piece of paper and a job don't bother. Be an accounting major.

I'm a jazz studies major in school. I'm playing two weddings for $350 soon. Playing a musical for $1000. $100 for two hours of background music.

That easily pays for rent and utilities. In addition to my day job and lessons I teach I do well for myself. Want a steady income? Pick a different profession. And if you want to succeed be prepared to sacrifice relationships, a social life and relaxation.



A few years into really doing this, it stopped feeling like sacrifices. I knew I wasn't like the other boys when I just didn't give a **** if I was missing some cocktail mixer or predrink at mikey's house or whatever. Not that that stuff isn't fun , I just didn't care.

What I mean is it's not a sacrifice if you choose it as a lifestyle. A monk doesn't long for a thanksgiving turkey. Just pick up the bowl of rice and keep movin with your work.

It seems like you have some of that , because that puts your monthly at about 2 grand this month, which puts you at about 20 grand a change for a yearly which by most people's standards isn't a lot.

The good side ? Pretty much everyone BLOWS with finances and they just work more to get more stuff. If you don't care about "stuff" filling your house, you will be fine.

It's the trade off

many people work 40 hours a week under somebody to get that same money, but we don't have to do that and "work" considerably less (funny thing is that the gig is generally the easiest part...)

but we have room for fluctuations, both ways.
Don't tell me what can not be done

Don't tell me what can be done, either.



I love you all no matter what.
Last edited by nightwind at Sep 29, 2010,
#6
Quote by TheWho2
I want to go to school for music. I don't know if I want to major in Jazz Studies, Music Ed or Performance.

I know if I major in Music Ed I can become a teacher.

But if I major in Performance or Jazz Studies what can I do when I'm done with college? I just don't want to get out and be like "oh fu*k now what."



Well tbh, thats probably the position you'll be in.

basically you can gig, you can teach at a music store. The same things you can do without the degree.


one thing to consider is that when you do it for a living its.... a job. That may not bother you.... but then again it might.
shred is gaudy music