#1
Just a few scales that have been trumping me in terms of application. Please post any thoughts or songs which use these.

In A for simplicity.

Mixo-Blues

e|------------------------------------------------5--8--9------
B|---------------------------------------4--5--8---------------
G|------------------------------5--6--7------------------------
D|------------------------5--7---------------------------------
A|------------4--5--6--7---------------------------------------
E|------5--8---------------------------------------------------

Mixo being an abbreviation of Mixolydian right? Because I don't really see the resemblance just yet. Kinda just looks like a Major 3rd was pasted onto the blues scale, however after hearing how it works with the dominant 7th I can kind of understand where the Mixo idea came from.

Bebops
Minor

|------------------------------------------------------5--7--8--9------
|---------------------------------------------5--7--8------------------
|---------------------------------4--5--6--7---------------------------
|------------------------4--5--7---------------------------------------
|---------------4--5--7------------------------------------------------
|------5--7--8---------------------------------------------------------

Major

|---------------------------------------------------4--5--7--9------
|------------------------------------------5--6--7------------------
|---------------------------------4--6--7---------------------------
|------------------------4--6--7------------------------------------
|------------4--5--7--8---------------------------------------------
|------5--7---------------------------------------------------------

Dominant

|---------------------------------------------------4--5--7--9------
|------------------------------------------5--7--8------------------
|---------------------------------4--6--7---------------------------
|---------------------4--5--6--7------------------------------------
|------------4--5--7------------------------------------------------
|------5--7---------------------------------------------------------

I know there are more, I only did some brief research on these, and I'm still having trouble grasping the concept of chromatic passing tones. But then again I'm not entirely fluent in Jazz theory. Pretty much all I have to say about these, I heard Charlie Christian used them a bit, so any song links would be good.

There's a few other scales that have slipped my mind atm, so I'll post them later, also here's a weird blunder I came across.

|------------------------------------------
|------------------------------------------
|------5----7----8-----------------------
|------------------------------------------
|------5----7----8-----------------------
|------------------------------------------

Pretty vague, but some guy I know was doing some cool slide stuff based off this, and he asked me what scale it was from (as he does), and I couldn't answer him.

Feel free to post any other scale queries here.
lol guitar
#2
The last thing isn't from a scale, or more correctly there's no way to determine what scale it is from with such a small, out-of-context snippet.
Actually called Mark!

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#3
scales are not shapes on a fretboard.
can you spell these scales, in any key? play them in parts of the fretboard over two octaves? in three, two and one string forms? If the answer is no id learn how to do that.
As for the bebop scales, the point of the passing tones is rhythmic placement, so if you start on a chord tone and play an eighth note line chord tones will always be on the beat.
you should practice them acsending and descending from root to root, third to third, fifth to fitfth, seventh to fifth and then all the other combinations (root to third, fifth to seventh etc. with third to seventh being the most important).
Last edited by tehREALcaptain at Sep 30, 2010,
#4
The Mixo-Blues scale is a little different than what you posted, you're were missing the 2 and the 6:

A Mixo-Blues

e|------------------------------------------------------------5--7--8--9--
B|------------------------------------------------4--5--7--8--------------
G|------------------------------------4--5--6--7--------------------------
D|---------------------------4--5--7--------------------------------------
A|---------------4--5--6--7-----------------------------------------------
E|------5--7--8-----------------------------------------------------------


This scale is created simply from a Major Pent scale super imposed over a Blues scale from the same Root.

I have a 50+ example tutorial on this scale. It contains tab, audio, fretboard diagrams, explanations, etc...everything you need. It is 100% free too, no ads, no nothing but straight up learning pertaining to that scale.

http://lessons.mikedodge.com/lessons/AdvPent/AvdPentTOC.htm

Have at it. READ the Introduction as it'll explain how I found this across a bunch of different genres of music and how you can manipulate it and create from it forever...I've been using this idea for over 20 years. Start from the top through and work your way through as I'll show you some very important sounds and ideas with the scale.

Have fun!
#5
Are you trying to explore different ideas simply by using different scales?

If so, it may sound like a good idea on the surface, but it can also be quite ignorant, especially if you dont have an underlying foundation on how they might be used.

What I would suggest is lay off those a while until you realize the point of them, such as a melodic minor scale, or a symmetrical scale has far different layers of application than the Major scale does in terms of keys. If you know Jazz then these make sense, if you don't they sound like crap because you don't know what your doing or why its supposed to work, like does your underlying chord use #5, for example or b9? If you don't know what you are doing, you may be putting way too much stock into learning these scales. They are only going to make less and less sense for you.

As for Mixolydian blues, its a b5 and b7, and your example is missing the 2 and 6. The name of the scale pretty much tells you exactly what it is, if you know what they mean individually. You're sort of right about it sounding like a major 3rd against minor sound.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Sep 30, 2010,
#6
Quote by tehREALcaptain
scales are not shapes on a fretboard.
can you spell these scales, in any key? play them in parts of the fretboard over two octaves? in three, two and one string forms? If the answer is no id learn how to do that.

Well sure, but that's not my problem, my problem is being locked in a diatonic mind I suppose.
eg A Bebop Minor:

A B C C# D E F# G A

1 2 b3 3 4 5 6 b7

T S S S T T S T

I look at that and see it as a minor with a major 6th and an added major 3rd (or Dorian with an added major 3rd if that makes sense). Obviously there's a huge difference in application (and theory) between these scales and the diatonic scales I'm familiar with.

@MikeDodge: Thanks man, looks good.

Quote by Sean0913

What I would suggest is lay off those a while until you realize the point of them, such as a melodic minor scale, or a symmetrical scale has far different layers of application than the Major scale does in terms of keys.

I'm not quite sure what you're actually suggesting, I'm not too shabby with melodic minor, probably because it's structure isn't too hard to understand and it's still diatonic.
It's these weird chromatic movements that are baffling me.

TL;DR Jazz noob here.
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Last edited by Serpentarius at Oct 1, 2010,