#1
In Classical Guitar sheets. How am I suppose to know if I hold a note till the end and play the following note or play that and hit the next note while sustaining the previous. Please look at the Examples because it was very hard to type out
For example
http://classicalguitarschool.net/music/1085.pdf
First Piece First Bar Would I play Like this?

C------------C---------Rest C----
B-----

G-----

E------------------------E------------------------
1 2 3 4 5 6
Beats

^That makes no sense but to read it literally I think thats how it would sound.

Or

C------------C---------- rest C---
B----


D-----
E------------------------- E-------------------------
1 2 3 4 5

I'm fairly sure its the Latter since its 4/4 but classical guitar sheet is so confusing. How am I suppose to know if I'm suppose to play note over each other? And when do I do it? and Whats that Rest for anyways? I'm suppose to rest while playing an E for 2 beats? Guitar can play many notes at once like a piano but how am I suppose to know when or whatever.

Edit- My post makes no sense because my post doesn't look like what I wrote. Do I play each note one by one or over each other.
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Last edited by Thepredster at Sep 30, 2010,
#2
Just follow the duration of the note I think ?
Or maybe it's the way it's written which confuse you.
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#3
Can't make the music out from your post, but I looked at the PDF.

A note is held for as long as it's notated. So let's look at measure one in the first piece. There's an E there that's a half note. It should be held for two beats. The C above it should only be held one beat, being a quarter note. Notes can also be tied so that the first note continues into the next note it's tied to. But I don't see any ties in that piece, so worry about that later.

And that eighth note rest goes with the eighth note that follows it.

So to recap, first measure: First you play the E and C on the first beat. Then you play the C quarter note on beat 2 while holding the E. On beat 3, you play an E again on the first eighth note "chunk", immediately followed by the G eighth note while still holding the E. That G is played one eighth rest following the E. The last beat, you play C and B as eighth notes, all the while with that E still ringing.

Hope that's clear (hey I tried... lol). Not as complicated as it looks.

Hope that helps.
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#4
If I follow the durations exactly. The bars wouldn't be consistent.
First Bar would be - 6 and 1/4
Second Bar would be -6
3rd Bar would be -6
4th bar would be 7 and 1/4
But looking at it. Its obviously in 4/4. I just hold the half notes and play the other notes over. But how am I suppose to know this on more complicated piece and when do I hit the other notes while holding down the halfs notes. Musical Notation is meant for instruments where you hit one note back by back like violin and flute but Guitar isn't like that.
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Last edited by Thepredster at Sep 30, 2010,
#5
It might be easier for you to look at is as a bassline underneath a melody line. It's quite common to have notes held for different lengths when you can play many notes at once.

So for the first 4 bars, you have a bassline which is comprised of only minums. and over the top, you have a melody line comprised of crotchets and quavers. The two are played at the same time.

Just make sure to read the music horizontally. If two notes are stacked, they are played together, not seperately.
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#6
I looked at the music, and all I can think is that maybe you are confused about the eighth notes. Every measure has only 4 beats in this piece and you were counting 6 and beyond. Take the melody in the first bar(the black notes): 2 quarters, an eighth rest, and 3 eighth notes = 4 beats. I think you are seeing all the notes and adding up the values as if they didn't occur at the same time with the half notes. Like the other poster said treat the melody and bass separate and then superimpose them on each other. Also are you using a classical method book? If not I would recommend Frederick Noad's Solo Guitar Playing. Hope this helps.
#7
try thinking of the music as two seperate lines in 4/4. the top line, is the melody (starting with the C) while the bottom is the bass line (the E half note). Each line is independant from the other, but they are meant to be played at the same time. So in the first measure you would strike both E and the C on beat one, hold the half note e it's full duration of 2 beats while striking another c on beat 2, and so on and so forth.
#8
Quote by Thepredster
If I follow the durations exactly. The bars wouldn't be consistent.
First Bar would be - 6 and 1/4
Second Bar would be -6
3rd Bar would be -6
4th bar would be 7 and 1/4
But looking at it. Its obviously in 4/4. I just hold the half notes and play the other notes over. But how am I suppose to know this on more complicated piece and when do I hit the other notes while holding down the halfs notes. Musical Notation is meant for instruments where you hit one note back by back like violin and flute but Guitar isn't like that.
Gelato gave good advice on considering them two separate lines. The two half notes are one line, and the other stuff is the other line. The two half notes add up to one 4/4 measure. So do the other notes.

You're quite clearly having problems with note values above and beyond separating the lines. The durations you worked out are wrong no matter how you look at it.

I'm wondering if maybe you don't know all the note values? That little rest above the second C half note is an eighth rest, and the note after it is an eighth note. They add up to a quarter note.

I'm not looking at the PDF right now, but isolating the top line from the one with the two half notes, we can count the note values. Ignore the two half notes for now. You need the equivalent of 4 quarter notes to add up to one measure. Two quarter notes at the start account for half the measure. Then you have an eighth rest and an eighth note which add up to a quarter note. Then you have two eighth notes that add up to another quarter note. That's all 4 quarter notes accounted for.

All clear I hope?

Oh yeah, I should mention that yes, notation is designed to work with instruments that play multiple notes. For example, piano. What I'm saying is that it's not the notation which is at fault here.
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#9
Just to add to the good advice above:

An 8th note has a flag on the top, and consecutive 8th notes are joined by a bar. A quarter note just has a straight stick with no flag.

Paul