#1
I've started playing alot of Ska-Punk and I was wondering if they used digital delay in this song, SPECIFICALLY AT 2:40.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H9FBMM1v38c
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#2
i think that is analog.
I THINK!
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#3
After a bit of research, it appears that their guitarist uses a Boss DD-3.

Although it sounds like they added some reverb in the studio (to the vocals at least), so it's entirely possible that they did the delay on the guitar through the studio too.

Sounds like the DD-3 is more likely though.
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#5
Quote by Zycho
Does it really matter?
Yeah, actually it does. I don't really know the exact reason TS wants to know, but there's a big difference between digital and analog/tape delay.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
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#6
I doubt that he's using his pedal in the studio, big no no as far as I'm concerned. However I'd say that was digital.
#7
Quote by ImaHighwayChile
I doubt that he's using his pedal in the studio, big no no as far as I'm concerned. However I'd say that was digital.
What makes you say that?
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by food1010
Yeah, actually it does. I don't really know the exact reason TS wants to know, but there's a big difference between digital and analog/tape delay.


If there is such a big difference one would think it would be glaringly obvious on the recording, no? People spend way too much time over analyzing gear, go out and try stuff till you find what makes the sound you want instead of wasting time obsessing over who uses what and spec sheets.
#9
Quote by Zycho
If there is such a big difference one would think it would be glaringly obvious on the recording, no? People spend way too much time over analyzing gear, go out and try stuff till you find what makes the sound you want instead of wasting time obsessing over who uses what and spec sheets.
I find myself generally hearing my own tone a lot more critically than others'. Even when other people use my own gear, I'm not thinking about what I can do to improve it. I just hear it for what it is.

I do agree with your second point. To get an idea of what something really sounds like, you need to try it out.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#10
Quote by food1010
What makes you say that?



This is all subjective of course so I'm not saying by any means DONT use a pedal if thats how you work.

However I generally find that when I'm in the studio any gear that I may have, outboard or plug in, it's going to sound better than a guitar pedal and of course most importantly I (as the producer) have control.

If you are going to add any other delay on any other instrument later then it can be problematic if you are using anything except for that pedal, both in terms of sound/tone and, possibly, in terms of timing.

If a guitarist feels that he needs the delay to play then I simply send it back into his headphones via an aux track.

This goes along with the problem of beggining sound engineers using an individual 'verb for each track, you will get mud.
#11
Quote by ImaHighwayChile
This is all subjective of course so I'm not saying by any means DONT use a pedal if thats how you work.

However I generally find that when I'm in the studio any gear that I may have, outboard or plug in, it's going to sound better than a guitar pedal and of course most importantly I (as the producer) have control.

If you are going to add any other delay on any other instrument later then it can be problematic if you are using anything except for that pedal, both in terms of sound/tone and, possibly, in terms of timing.

If a guitarist feels that he needs the delay to play then I simply send it back into his headphones via an aux track.

This goes along with the problem of beggining sound engineers using an individual 'verb for each track, you will get mud.
To each his own. I guess my preferences for a studio/production session are different. I obviously see where you're coming from now though. The way you worded it originally made it seem like you can't do it at all.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea