#1
I'm trying to learn German so I can speak it with my relatives. I know some words and stuff but like most english people I'm havin' problems with something.

Nominative, Accusative, Dative and Genitive cases.....because they relate to like Masculine, Feminine and Neuter nouns.

Can someone please give me some examples. I know when to use Ein and Eine. Or Ihr and Irhe. But it's the einen, einer, einem, irhen, irher, irhes etc that is really skull f*cking me.
#2
Okay, I'm currently learning Ancient Greek and Latin, but they're essentially the same idea with the cases.

German, and some other languages, decline their nouns in combination with an article to make their usages in the sentence clear. Hence, every noun you use will have a declension, meaning you add endings onto the stem of the word (einen, einer, etc.). There are likely to be several different declensions, some with different masculine/feminine/neuter endings etc.

Generally speaking, the nominative case is used as the subject of a sentence, ie the one performing the action. Bob ate the cake. Bob is the subject and in another language, would be in the nominative case.

Genitive is generally used to indicate a possessive; Bob's cake would be translated as the cake of Bob, and "of Bob" would be the genitive ending of Bob. There's many different cases in which genitive is used.

Dative, a little more confusing, is used for indirect objects most commonly. For example, Bob gave a piece of cake to his mother. His mother would be in the dative case. This is often used as in the English "_________ something to _________".

Accusative is used for the direct object of sentences. I picked up the dog, the dog would be in the accusative case as it's receiving the immediate action.

I'm a bit of a language junkie. Most of the romance languages are essentially the same with tweaking and some differences here and there.
#3
Okay, "-en" is used for the accusative case for masculine nouns, "-em" is for dative masculine and neutral nouns, "-e" is for feminine nouns in the nominative and accusative cases, "-er" is used for feminine nouns in the dative and genitive cases, and "-es" is used for masculine and neutral nouns in the genitive case.

EDIT: Oh, you want examples? TBH, my German vocab sucks; for some reason, I still remember the grammar, though.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Oct 1, 2010,
#4
When you take Russian, you have the right to complain about cases
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#7
Quote by Holy Katana
Latin has more.


It's really quite annoying Six cases times two numbers (singular, plural) in multiple different declensions across several different sets of endings. Awesome.
#8
Quote by joemama9119
Okay, I'm currently learning Ancient Greek and Latin, but they're essentially the same idea with the cases.

German, and some other languages, decline their nouns in combination with an article to make their usages in the sentence clear. Hence, every noun you use will have a declension, meaning you add endings onto the stem of the word (einen, einer, etc.). There are likely to be several different declensions, some with different masculine/feminine/neuter endings etc.

Generally speaking, the nominative case is used as the subject of a sentence, ie the one performing the action. Bob ate the cake. Bob is the subject and in another language, would be in the nominative case.

Genitive is generally used to indicate a possessive; Bob's cake would be translated as the cake of Bob, and "of Bob" would be the genitive ending of Bob. There's many different cases in which genitive is used.

Dative, a little more confusing, is used for indirect objects most commonly. For example, Bob gave a piece of cake to his mother. His mother would be in the dative case. This is often used as in the English "_________ something to _________".

Accusative is used for the direct object of sentences. I picked up the dog, the dog would be in the accusative case as it's receiving the immediate action.

I'm a bit of a language junkie. Most of the romance languages are essentially the same with tweaking and some differences here and there.



Thanks! This is sort of beginning to make some sense.

In the case of your cake example...I think that that would be "Bob gab ein stuck kuchen zu seiner mutter."...................
#9
Quote by joemama9119
It's really quite annoying Six cases times two numbers (singular, plural) in multiple different declensions across several different sets of endings. Awesome.


the 5th one is hardly ever used though, I don't really find it to be worthy of being it's own case


OP, it's "ihre" not "irhe"
#10
Quote by Holy Katana
Latin has more.

no wonder that shit is dead. My Russian prof says that most native russians mess there cases up when talking because they can't think about them all while at speaking pace.


I thank Shakespeare for making English easier
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What happened to Snake?

Snake?

Snake?

SNAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAKE?!


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you can take my mouse and keyboard from my cold, slightly orange from cheetos, dead fingers


Quote by Baby Joel
Isis is amazing
#11
Quote by The\m/
Thanks! This is sort of beginning to make some sense.

In the case of your cake example...I think that that would be "Bob gab ein stuck kuchen zu seiner mutter."...................

Nope.

"Bob gab seiner Mutter ein Stück Kuchen."

and it's Ihrer, not Irher
#12
Quote by CoreysMonster
Nope.

"Bob gab seiner Mutter ein Stück Kuchen."

and it's Ihrer, not Irher


Yeah I know. I made a spelling mistake.

Does your sentence not translate to "Bob gave his mother a piece of cake".

I thought mine would translate "Bob gave a piece of cake TO his mother"???????
#13
I try to watch the Bundesliga in German to get used to hearing the language. I really want to start learning it.
#14
Quote by The\m/
Yeah I know. I made a spelling mistake.

Does your sentence not translate to "Bob gave his mother a piece of cake".

I thought mine would translate "Bob gave a piece of cake TO his mother"???????


Essentially the same meaning.

And yes, the 5th case in Latin is rare, but you have to know it just as well as your other five cases just so you can actually recognize it. I assume you're referring to the ablative? Some schools learn their cases in weird orders, we've always done: nom., gen., dat., acc., abl., voc.
#15
Quote by The\m/
Thanks! This is sort of beginning to make some sense.

In the case of your cake example...I think that that would be "Bob gab ein stuck kuchen zu seiner mutter."...................

It's "Bob hat einem Stück Kuchen seiner Mutter gegeben," I'm pretty sure. You got one of the declensions wrong, and the present perfect is usually used instead of the simple past to describe something that happened in the past, at least in less formal language.

EDIT: Shit. Made a mistake.
Last edited by Holy Katana at Oct 1, 2010,
#16
Quote by Holy Katana
It's "Bob hat einem Stück Kuchen seiner Mutter gegeben," I'm pretty sure. You got one of the declensions wrong, and the present perfect is usually used instead of the simple past to describe something that happened in the past, at least in less formal language.

EDIT: Shit. Made a mistake.



What I take away from all of these posts is that modern English really is where it's at.

It makes infinitely more sense to say "a dog, a cat, the girl, the girls"

Rather than "Ein hund, Eine Katze, Das Madchen, Die Madchen"
#17
Quote by The\m/
What I take away from all of these posts is that modern English really is where it's at.

It makes infinitely more sense to say "a dog, a cat, the girl, the girls"

Rather than "Ein hund, Eine Katze, Das Madchen, Die Madchen"

Maybe that's why my Russian professor likes Stop Making Sense.

хахаха!
#18
Quote by Holy Katana
It's "Bob hat einem Stück Kuchen seiner Mutter gegeben," I'm pretty sure. You got one of the declensions wrong, and the present perfect is usually used instead of the simple past to describe something that happened in the past, at least in less formal language.

EDIT: Shit. Made a mistake.


Yeah, that's correct.

Past tense cases such as "ging" (went) and "gab" (gave) are narrative, whereas if you are talking to someone telling someone where you went, you would just use "ich bin zum/zur ____ gegangen."

I know the rules a lot better than I know the language. I can only put together simple sentences.
#19
Yeah the only way to learn any language me thinks is to just hear shit and repeat it in the correct situation. It's how I learned English.
#20
Der Junge schlägt seinen Vater.

"The boy hits his father" (just for example's sake )

"Vater" is in the accusative case, therefore you have "seinen" instead of "sein", which is for nominative.


Der Junge gibt seinem Vater den Schraubenzieher.

"The boy gives his father a screwdriver"

"Schraubenzieher" is in the accusative case (deN), whereas "Vater" is dative case now (seineM).

I hope this makes stuff a bit more clear
May I also refer you to the German thread?
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#22
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#23
Quote by beadhangingOne
Yeah, that's correct.

Past tense cases such as "ging" (went) and "gab" (gave) are narrative, whereas if you are talking to someone telling someone where you went, you would just use "ich bin zum/zur ____ gegangen."

I know the rules a lot better than I know the language. I can only put together simple sentences.

Same here. My vocabulary is pitiful.
#24
Quote by joemama9119
Essentially the same meaning.

And yes, the 5th case in Latin is rare, but you have to know it just as well as your other five cases just so you can actually recognize it. I assume you're referring to the ablative? Some schools learn their cases in weird orders, we've always done: nom., gen., dat., acc., abl., voc.


We did, nom., gen. then the voc. was kinda like "so kids, there's this thing and basically it's when people are getting pissed and exclamation marks are needed, move along" and then did dat., acc, and abl. with all it's nasty little grammar funniez.


Quote by Holy Katana
It's "Bob hat einem Stück Kuchen seiner Mutter gegeben,"


"Bob hat seiner Mutter ein Stück Kuchen gegeben"
Believe me.
Last edited by Nilpferdkoenig at Oct 1, 2010,
#25
Quote by Gibson_SG_uzr55


I thank Shakespeare for making English easier


You are thanking the wrong person then, he didn't change a thing about English.

I clicked on this thread because as a linguist it's relevant to my interests but it seems like you guys have it covered. I do feel like I should add I read an original brothers Grimm German dictionary today


Oh and waah Finnish has more cases...