#1
I'm going to be picking up a few students next year and I want to do things right. I don't want to have them show up and have me jump from subject to subject with no direction.

So, I need to know, where do I start? I am going to be teaching Acoustic and Electric Guitar and Bass Guitar. I need to know not only where to start and go to, but also what to recommend in terms of practice schedules. This would also be helpful for me to learn I suppose.

Now what I was thinking was a teaching path that goes something like this.

1. Basic Pentatonic, Major/Minor scale shapes and basic chord shapes on guitar and picking technique for both Guitar and Bass proper fretting hand position and technique.
2. Extended shapes, show how the scales expand along the whole neck and how to transpose them into different keys/positions and go through some songs to show how the scales work in practice.
3. Go through chord progressions and the building of chords and show how the progressions fit into the songs they know and how the melody works with the chords.
4. Barre chords, slap and pop, improv and writing their own chord progressions.
5. Progressing on to developing the skills they want to develop, teaching the basics of sweep picking, advanced slap and pop, two handed/ Multi- Finger tapping etc.

It's only a rough template which I would want to expand and improve a lot. But it's a start. As for a practice schedule I'm a bit more lost as I have never had a specific schedule myself. I was thinking something like:

10-15 minutes on alternate picking scales to keep technique sharp and efficient
10-20 so minutes working through different types of chords (just remembering the shapes for beginners, going through advanced shapes and inversions for more advanced players)
20-40 minutes on the technique they're currently focussing on be it a song, sweeping, tapping, slap and pop exercises etc.

Advice, suggestions, criticism, all are welcomed and desperately needed. Don't let me **** things up for these people. I'd hate to turn people away from what could become a true passion for them.
  • Fender American Standard Stratocaster
  • Ibanez RGD2127z
  • Yamaha Acoustic
  • Cort Bass


  • Laney LC30
Last edited by kLinic at Oct 1, 2010,
#2
I would maybe include in the beginning some very basic things like, how to properly hold a pick, how to hold your hand on the neck, posture, etc. Unless they are already novice's and your just teaching them more things.
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#3
Yeah, sure, I'll edit that in. Picking technique would include holding the pick, but they definitely need to learn how to efficiently use their fretting hands.
  • Fender American Standard Stratocaster
  • Ibanez RGD2127z
  • Yamaha Acoustic
  • Cort Bass


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#4
it really depends, this may work for older people, but if you have young kids they aren't going to be able to comprehend a lot of it, i know from experience. your best bet is probably to find a book that you like and guide them through it, maybe adding in your own stuff here and there. having a book helps cause then they can reference it when they get out of the lesson and go to practice, cause they will forget stuff.
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#5
Quote by lpcustom325
it really depends, this may work for older people, but if you have young kids they aren't going to be able to comprehend a lot of it, i know from experience. your best bet is probably to find a book that you like and guide them through it, maybe adding in your own stuff here and there. having a book helps cause then they can reference it when they get out of the lesson and go to practice, cause they will forget stuff.


Definitely go with a book. I was teaching a load of 7-11ish year olds this summer and it was the only way we could make consistent progress.
#6
I think I have a few books leftover from my beginner years somewhere that I could probably bring out for younger students. Primarily though I think (Hope? :P) I will be teaching mainly older students. In which case it would probably still be a good idea to revisit a book in order to create a better learning pathway.

What about Practice Schedules though?
  • Fender American Standard Stratocaster
  • Ibanez RGD2127z
  • Yamaha Acoustic
  • Cort Bass


  • Laney LC30
#7
Depends on who is coming to you. A lot of people just wanna learn a few songs and have this little thing they can do. Some people want to become a musician, and create all sorts of complex melodies that will be respected by other musicians.

Make sure you both know the goal of the student
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#8
Honestly, teaching all the shapes and theory to complete newbs at guitar from the start will only lead to one thing: you losing a lot of your students.

Vast majority of people just want to start playing some simple songs they like, personally that's what I'd start with. Teach them a song along with 3-4 most basic chords and explain things as you go along, then when they have the basic grasp of how to pick/strum and fret the chords, teach them more. You can't rush these things.
#9
Depends on the student....and if the student is a minor - the student's parent(s). Unfortunately, they can get pretty nasty sometimes when you contradict anything their kid wants or says. In other cases - their expectations do not jive with what the kid wants. So the kid is happy, but the parents are not.

The only way around this is to discuss up front, and be flexible. Talk to the student (and if applicable the parents) ahead of time, and find out if they all agree with your plan for teaching.
If not... then right now is the time to get everyone on the same page.

Even when no parents involved - it's a good idea to let the student have at least some say in what goes on.
Again, get this out in the open before any problems surface.

Good luck
#10
don't forget to tech them the musical staff..... you know the lines go E G B D F ("Ernie Gave Burt Dead Frogs" or "Every Good Boy Does Fine" which ever you prefeer) and the spaces are F A C E...... just face, nothing really fancy..... this will really help when trying to tech chord theory, and for most people starting with an instrument it seems like they're sup-posed to learn that way..... most beginners books will have this any way....

Also it really helps to have a few simple tabs..... when I started my lessons, my teacher gave me the intro rif to enter sandman, and come as you are, and kryptonite..... these really made it easy to start learning since they are really famous and easy....those are just some examples....... there are hundreds of thousands of really simple ones, just find out what they want to learn.... letting them learn something easy will help encourage them, and make learning the blander things much easier....

just FYI

enter sandman:
e|--------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------------------|
G|--------------------------------------|
D|--------5----------------------------|
A|-----7---------7---------------------|
E|--0-------6-5------------------------|


come as you are:
e|--------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------------------|
G|--------------------------------------|
D|--------------------------------------|
A|-----------0---0-----------2------2-|
E|-0-0-1-2---2---2-2-1-0----0-0---|


kryptonite:
e|--------------------------------------|
B|--------3------------------2---------|
G|-----4---4--0-----0----2-----------|
D|---4-------4-----0----2-------------|
A|-2--------------2----0---------------|
E|---------------3----------------------|