#1
Hey,
Iv been playing guitar for around 2 years now and I have recently gotten into a band. The only problem is the we have 3 guitarists and no bassist and as the other two have been playing longer I agreed to take up bass.
I was just wondering, if the guitarists were playing a progression would I just play the root note of what ever chords there playing?

Also what would be a good good way to start to learn?

Cheers,
Mark
#2
if you're not totally into bass i wouldnt start it...bands fall apart, you might get bored etc...

if you love bass and just need an excuse to get one (like i did)i would just get good finger strength and make bassline...the root note is not all you have to play (say a root, 5th and 3rd) or cme up with other stuff

i would start looking at basslines. start off wit bands like the beatles (paul mccartney has some good ones) and just learn some bass lines so you sort of 'understand them'

it is also important not to treat the bass as a longer version of the guitar which many guitarists gone bassists do (i included)
#3
Paul McCartney is a good example of someone who played bass because the other two guitarists in the band were better than him. And it worked out well for that band. Learn 'Day Tripper', it's fab.
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#4
I transitioned over from guitar to bass myself, what you've described there would be a perfectly acceptable way to start; hell, a lot of pop, punk, and rock never gets beyond that.

I agree with the '93 in that you'll get more of a feel for the groove as you learn to play some other bass lines.

Although I would disagree that you have to be committed to bass in order to play it; I started because I was a guitarist in a town full of guitarists, and bass gave me some more options in terms of playing with people. Over time, I've grown to love bass, and now I actually prefer it, when I'm not composing.
#5
Quote by '93
if you're not totally into bass i wouldnt start it...bands fall apart, you might get bored etc...

if you love bass and just need an excuse to get one (like i did)i would just get good finger strength and make bassline...the root note is not all you have to play (say a root, 5th and 3rd) or cme up with other stuff

i would start looking at basslines. start off wit bands like the beatles (paul mccartney has some good ones) and just learn some bass lines so you sort of 'understand them'

it is also important not to treat the bass as a longer version of the guitar which many guitarists gone bassists do (i included)


Well were not being very serious about it, its just 3 friends gonna throw some songs together and having some fun and maybe doing some gigs soon so i;m not worried if its gonna fall apart
Is there certain exercises that would help with finger strength or will I just learn a few basslines and it will build up doing that?
Oh and I know that the bass is a completely different beast
#6
One other thing I'd say is that, in my opinion, bass is harder to get a nice satisfying tone for. I might just be a snob, but I've found I've had to spend a little more money on my bass amp to get it sounding good (whereas I use a Line6 Pod X3 for guitar).
#7
Quote by star-dad
Well were not being very serious about it, its just 3 friends gonna throw some songs together and having some fun and maybe doing some gigs soon so i;m not worried if its gonna fall apart
Is there certain exercises that would help with finger strength or will I just learn a few basslines and it will build up doing that?
Oh and I know that the bass is a completely different beast


its not really about how serious you're taking it (thats up to you really) but rather if you're playing bass only for the band and for yourself as well, that you personnally are interested.

its not much off a problem if you end up being not that interested but it is a bit a cash wasted (thats why i was so worried about getting my bass). but if you end up liking it then its all ok. its not the first time though that people have been dissatisfied with a band because they werent playing their primary instrument (prime example noel redding)

i would suggest chromatic excersizes, just going up and down the bass neck and across the strings. i found it much hard to play than guitar but playing guitar would help you quite a bit
#8
I think the biggest difference between bass and guitar is the rhythm. bass is much much much more rhythmic than guitar is. also another one is chords. in guitar you play harmonically, where bass you play them melodically (all at once, vs one note at a time.) this means you need to focus a lot more on the order of the notes and things like that. lets say as a guitarist you want to play a Gm7 chord. you would just strum a chord, but as a bassist the order of the notes you hit greatly affects the sound. G Bb D A G A D Bb in straight eigth notes will give you a much different feel than if you were to pull some octave jumps and make a rest or two, add some trills, and get a much more funkier feel.
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#9
Yeah, just start looking at bass lines in existing songs, and songs you actually like are even better. Also, similar to Wolffgang, I started learning Bass so it would sort of "complete" the sound, when playing with others, and doing personal recordings. And although I prefer to play guitar, I love playing bass too.

Hope it's helped
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#10
You have to start somewhere. You can't be the next Tony Levin just by picking up a bass... Have a listen to bass line in 'Roundabout' by Yes.
Marshall amplifiers are the truest purveyors of rock and roll known to man.

"And give a man an amplifier and a synthesizer, and he doesn't become whoever, you know. He doesn't become us."

Holy crap, check this out!
#11
Quote by Wolffgang
One other thing I'd say is that, in my opinion, bass is harder to get a nice satisfying tone for. I might just be a snob, but I've found I've had to spend a little more money on my bass amp to get it sounding good (whereas I use a Line6 Pod X3 for guitar).


I actually experienced the opposite. I find my tone to be great just by plugging into a PA and adjusting the preamp knobs on my bass. Still working out a pedal board, but so far, a PA has been good enough for me. When i play my guitar, im pretty specific on what i want (tube head, g-flex cab, EMGs, 8 string, etc).

Wierd.
#12
Cheers for the help lads. I'm gonna pick a bass up in the next week or two and i'l be sure to take your advice and look at Paul Mccartney bass lines and ones from a few songs I like and if I think i'm gonna stick with it then i'l get a few lessons so I don't end up with horrible technique.
Again, thanks for the advice