#1
I play through a POD XT Live and through some seperate EQ and compression pedals and was wondering what you guys think for general tips for getting good tone on recordings?


What I normally do is cut the gain atleast 30% from my live tone and then double track (either actually play along as 2 seperate recordings or cut and paste and offset the other slightly) then stereo pan them both. Turns out pretty good, but I was just curious if anyone else has some general tips that I may not know that will make me sound even more professional in the production stage.
#2
Quote by MegaDTSX
I play through a POD XT Live and through some seperate EQ and compression pedals and was wondering what you guys think for general tips for getting good tone on recordings?


What I normally do is cut the gain atleast 30% from my live tone and then double track (either actually play along as 2 seperate recordings or cut and paste and offset the other slightly) then stereo pan them both. Turns out pretty good, but I was just curious if anyone else has some general tips that I may not know that will make me sound even more professional in the production stage.

Not trying to be mean but I'd skip the eq and comp pedals completely, thwy're not really designed for professional recording and it's better to eq after recording than before as then it is reversible (as long as you mix in the box). Also, compressing distorted guitars is a bit pointless as they'realready a heavily compressed signal (which is what gives the distortion) so shouldn't really need much, if any,compression.

As for copy-pasting to double track, I wouldn't advise it as it doesn't really create the desired effect, instead playing the same signal twice but slightly out of phase. Best thing to do, bearing in mind you mentioned 'stereo panning' would be to record it 4 times,twice with your sound an twice again with a slightly different tone, and pan one of each tone hard left and the others hard right
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#3
A easy tip for guitarist is to soak your fretting hand in warm water to get rid of the scratching sound from having calluses. This can really help. You can also place a thick blanket over top of the amp cabs enclosing the mic and the cabs to catch the sound.

For drums if you have the money and mixing board space. Double mic all the drums, one mic on the top and bottom of the drum. This just gives you a massive amount of room to work in. Also triggering the bass drum and mixing it in with the acoustic signal can really give your kicks that extra umph your looking for. (this can also be done with all your drums) triggers like 10% acoustic 90% just mess with it and youll get a nice sound.

Cheap vocal reverb use the old shower trick. Place mic in the shower and go to work. makes an easy sound both for recordings. (not the best but it works)

hope this helps
-VK
#4
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Not trying to be mean but I'd skip the eq and comp pedals completely, thwy're not really designed for professional recording and it's better to eq after recording than before as then it is reversible (as long as you mix in the box). Also, compressing distorted guitars is a bit pointless as they'realready a heavily compressed signal (which is what gives the distortion) so shouldn't really need much, if any,compression.

As for copy-pasting to double track, I wouldn't advise it as it doesn't really create the desired effect, instead playing the same signal twice but slightly out of phase. Best thing to do, bearing in mind you mentioned 'stereo panning' would be to record it 4 times,twice with your sound an twice again with a slightly different tone, and pan one of each tone hard left and the others hard right



Good tips. I use Cubase 5 so I'm sure I would be better off just not compressing until after recording. As for the tracking, I'll experiment more....although from the sounds of it 4x the recording is a little much.
#5
For rhythm guitar recording, simply record twice, pan left and right and it should sound nice enough. Will give a massive sound to the rhythms. Doubling each track (2 left, 2 right) is rather pointless as the two tracks would blend and go abit muddy. Decreasing the gain on the tracks is a smart move
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#6
Quote by MickAlmighty
For rhythm guitar recording, simply record twice, pan left and right and it should sound nice enough. Will give a massive sound to the rhythms. Doubling each track (2 left, 2 right) is rather pointless as the two tracks would blend and go abit muddy. Decreasing the gain on the tracks is a smart move

The idea of recording two on each side is to give it a thicker sound - if you were worried about the tracks getting muddy, you could simply put one on each side panned a bit more centrally.

Anyway, the usual trick is to record two passes of one guitarist, for the left channel and two passes of the other guitarist, for the right channel (or in a one guitar band, one person does all). I've recorded at studios many times, and am doing a degree in sound engineering & production at the moment, this isn't just my own idea of how to record. A competent guitarist (one who is capable of playing the song as well as he/she should be to record it well) is more than capable of recording two takes of the track, in time with each other and the rest of the band.


Edit: Also, I don't understand the reasoning behind someone lowering the gain from their live tone to be honest - you should go on stage with the best sound (an opinion, of course) possible, so if you are throwing extra gain to the live sound than what it needs, either you're not listening to the amp properly on stage or you haven't quite nailed the song enough to be able to play it at a lower gain setting night after night.

I know it was the TS that was doing this, not the person I quoted, but both seemed in agreement lol.
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Last edited by DisarmGoliath at Oct 6, 2010,
#7
Here's a tip that many, many guitarists do not know: Never, ever, EVER scoop your mids when you record guitar. I know it sounds all heavy and stuff when you're just playing on your own, but in a recording, or even a live setting, never scoop your mids. The entire tone of the guitar is in that frequency range, and if you cut it, all you're getting is a bunch of rumble and fizz.
#8
^ Totally ri- Wait a minute...

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