#1
Hey all,

Im at the stage where I want to push the limits of my gitar setup to get that richer fuller tone etc. Currently I have a hand made electric with Seymour Duncan humbuckers (SH1 and SH5) I believe. I'm using my Fender Roc Pro1000 and the overdrive channels on that. I also have a compressor to help with the clean sound.

What would peoples opinions be on say forking out for some nice hand made pickups such as Amalfitano (which I've heard good things about) or simply buying a new high end guitar. Does the guitar itself contribute mostly to the tone or is it just the right pickups and setup played through the right pedals and amp etc.

i.e. could money be more wisely spent by getting some new pickups and an amp or just 1 expensive guitar?

I like playing clean and with overdrive. I wouldn't say I have any particular one style. Just not too heavy.
Attachments:
PC120499_small.jpg
Last edited by josephgriffiths at Oct 3, 2010,
#2
Everything contributes to the tone, however the amp and pickups will affect it moreso then say, the wood of your guitar.
If you're looking for a straight up better sound, your best bet is a new amp imo.
You have a nice ass guitar, and some pretty good pickups already, why get new ones?
-------------------------------------------
Gear:

Guitar(s): .Shecter Tempest EXTREMEEEEEE
--------------Maton CW-80

Amplification: Randall RG75 G3
#3
^That.

+I like the heineken in the background .

Also, certain woods sound better than others, but your pups (SDs are pretty good) and your amp affect your tone the most.
#5
Quote by Nimbus456
Everything contributes to the tone, however the amp and pickups will affect it moreso then say, the wood of your guitar.
If you're looking for a straight up better sound, your best bet is a new amp imo.
You have a nice ass guitar, and some pretty good pickups already, why get new ones?


Well when I first got the Seymour Duncan pickups I was amazed at how much better the guitar sounded. I'm just wondering if it's possible to push that sound even more with some hand wound pickups...?

The total amount I spent on my guitar including SD pickups was about 1/3rd the amount of a new Gibson Les Paul for example. So does that make a Gibson Les Paul WAY better than mine. I'm just wondering where my money from this point would be best spent..

Maybe it is the amp...
#6
Try it through some different amps, as by the looks of things your guitar is already pretty badass! It might be possible to push it a bit further, but maybe not much. Try and get an idea in your head of the exact tone you want, how close your guitar gets you to that tone right now, and if a different amp will get you closer to the tone.
#7
Quote by Nimbus456
Everything contributes to the tone, however the amp and pickups will affect it moreso then say, the wood of your guitar.
If you're looking for a straight up better sound, your best bet is a new amp imo.
You have a nice ass guitar, and some pretty good pickups already, why get new ones?


Absoloutely wrong. Unless we're talking about active pickups, the wood of your guitar affects the tone waaaaaaaaaay more than the pickups. The pickups change which characteristics of the wood show off, but Basswood sounds a million worlds away from Mahogany from my experience.

The amp is by far the biggest change of sound. I'd take a 4000 dollar amp with a 400 dollar guitar ANYDAY over a 4000 dollar guitar with a 400 dollar amp.
Last edited by Guitar Sushi at Oct 3, 2010,
#8
^Thankyou! So many people say wood has little effect, its the exact opposite.
Wood is very important in getting a good sound. You can have a guitar with average wood, that can sound OK, but a good body is the difference between a good sound and a great sound.

How does the guitar sound acoustically? Is it resonant and loud, can you feel the whole guitar vibrating when you strum a chord? If so, then its probably worth upgrading the pickups. If it sounds dead and doesn't resonate very well, I'd look for a new guitar.
When you're buying a guitar, try every one you can, and dont just play them plugged in. About 80% of the time, a guitar that resonates and is loud acoustically will sound better through an amp, they usually sustain better and most of the time will be the lightest of the lot.
Last edited by littlephil at Oct 3, 2010,
#9
Quote by littlephil
^Thankyou! So many people say wood has little effect, its the exact opposite.
Wood is very important in getting a good sound. You can have a guitar with average wood, that can sound OK, but a good body is the difference between a good sound and a great sound.

How does the guitar sound acoustically? Is it resonant and loud, can you feel the whole guitar vibrating when you strum a chord? If so, then its probably worth upgrading the pickups. If it sounds dead and doesn't resonate very well, I'd look for a new guitar.
When you're buying a guitar, try every one you can, and dont just play them plugged in. About 80% of the time, a guitar that resonates and is loud acoustically will sound better through an amp, they usually sustain better and most of the time will be the lightest of the lot.


Well it makes a pretty descent sound acoustically not plugged in, so I guess the wood is doing something.

One thing that I don't like is the higher notes on say the high E and B string sound a bit "whinny". Whereas if I pick up a Strat, the sound is beautifully balanced over all the notes. I'm not sure if this is the pickups/my amp/ or maybe the wood causes some undesirable frequencies to generate on some notes...
#11
Quote by littlephil
It could be fret buzz on the high frets, that generally causes that sort of sound.


No definately not fret buzz.

I probably over exagerated. Actually now that I think about it it could just be the amp or the acoustics of my bedroom that make those notes sound bad...I'll definately take my guitar into a shop and play on some different amps.

Any recommendations for a new amp? Something for both clean and a light-medium drive sound?
#12
Boutique pups will set you back what? About $400? And I promise you they will not sound much better than what you have. Playing through a £50 amp is your problem. You could buy a new amp and keep that as a spare. Or you could put a tube pre-amp into the FX return and make use of the Fender's power amp.
My ears tell me that Alder is an ok wood for classic to 80's rock/metal, so I can't see a lot of need to replace the guitar if its playing nicely. Maybe invest a bit in a pro setup to get that little extra from it.
I pick up my guitar and play
Just like Yesterday

T C Ellis Series 2 LP w/Skatterbrane Quiescence pups
Cort EVL-K6
Yamaha RGX211 modded
H&S Electric 12-string
Shaftsbury Ricki 4001
'84 Fender Yale
Roland Cube 15x

#13
Anyone have any popcorn? I find the bullcrap spewed in this thread semi amusing. Just remember if you read it on the internut it must be true!!
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#14
Quote by Lurcher
Boutique pups will set you back what? About $400? And I promise you they will not sound much better than what you have.

Good point

Quote by Lurcher
Playing through a £50 amp is your problem. You could buy a new amp and keep that as a spare. Or you could put a tube pre-amp into the FX return and make use of the Fender's power amp.

I payed more than that maybe I got ripped off.

Quote by Lurcher
My ears tell me that Alder is an ok wood for classic to 80's rock/metal, so I can't see a lot of need to replace the guitar if its playing nicely. Maybe invest a bit in a pro setup to get that little extra from it.

Yeah I might start looking into amps, and separate drive pedals. I actually don't really like relying on the amps overdrive channels. I have to use the effects loop to get my delay after the pre-amp etc...

Thanks for tips...
#15
Quote by Bhaok
Anyone have any popcorn? I find the bullcrap spewed in this thread semi amusing. Just remember if you read it on the internut it must be true!!


Explain!
#16
For real. So many times I've seen people spend serious $ on guitars and have only rudimentary skills. My favorite guitar is an SG special body glue to a Washburn neck. It's primered gray and looks beat, but it also has Evo Gold fretwire, an Invader p/u, and is now strung 13-65 in A standard/dropped G. I have other "real" guits but this one's my go to. I couldn't even do anything with an expensive guitar to make it playable for my style and sound. An electric guit is just a big, weak generator and 99% of the sound is in p/us and strings. Sorry to anybody who paid 1500$ for a solidbody guitar- lol.
BTW Rockpros are pretty bad- I'd at least look into a booger or something.
#19
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
For real. So many times I've seen people spend serious $ on guitars and have only rudimentary skills.

Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
An electric guit is just a big, weak generator and 99% of the sound is in p/us and strings. Sorry to anybody who paid 1500$ for a solidbody guitar


1- Skill level is absolutely irrelevant when it comes to how much money people should spend on gear.
2- If you honestly believe that the body makes no difference in sound, you must be completely deaf.
Ever wonder why even 2 guitars made of the same wood will sound different?
Go try a Les Paul and an SG through the same amp. There is a difference between them, and they're both Mahogany body/neck, rosewood fretboard, set neck guitars. The specs of the 2 are almost the same, but they sound different.
#20
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
For real. So many times I've seen people spend serious $ on guitars and have only rudimentary skills. My favorite guitar is an SG special body glue to a Washburn neck. It's primered gray and looks beat, but it also has Evo Gold fretwire, an Invader p/u, and is now strung 13-65 in A standard/dropped G. I have other "real" guits but this one's my go to. I couldn't even do anything with an expensive guitar to make it playable for my style and sound. An electric guit is just a big, weak generator and 99% of the sound is in p/us and strings. Sorry to anybody who paid 1500$ for a solidbody guitar- lol.
BTW Rockpros are pretty bad- I'd at least look into a booger or something.


I will stab you.
E-peen:
Rhodes Gemini
Fryette Ultra Lead
Peavey 6505
THD Flexi 50

Gibson R0 Prototype
EBMM JP13 Rosewood
Fender CS Mary Kaye

WTLT

(512) Audio Engineering - Custom Pedal Builds, Mods and Repairs
#22
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
For real. So many times I've seen people spend serious $ on guitars and have only rudimentary skills. My favorite guitar is an SG special body glue to a Washburn neck. It's primered gray and looks beat, but it also has Evo Gold fretwire, an Invader p/u, and is now strung 13-65 in A standard/dropped G. I have other "real" guits but this one's my go to. I couldn't even do anything with an expensive guitar to make it playable for my style and sound. An electric guit is just a big, weak generator and 99% of the sound is in p/us and strings. Sorry to anybody who paid 1500$ for a solidbody guitar- lol.
BTW Rockpros are pretty bad- I'd at least look into a booger or something.


umm so instead of buying a guitar you won't have to upgrade like ever it's better to spend lots of money in small increments doing barely noticeable upgrades?

um 99 percent of the tone in the p/us and strings? have you ever rolled the same pickups through 6 or more guitars...

telling it like how you see it huh...illiterate much?

beauty of the burst easy as 1 page explanation of neck/body/bridge interaction
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#23
Quote by littlephil

1- Skill level is absolutely irrelevant when it comes to how much money people should spend on gear.
2- If you honestly believe that the body makes no difference in sound, you must be completely deaf.
Ever wonder why even 2 guitars made of the same wood will sound different?
Go try a Les Paul and an SG through the same amp. There is a difference between them, and they're both Mahogany body/neck, rosewood fretboard, set neck guitars. The specs of the 2 are almost the same, but they sound different.

The construction does make a diff, granted, but I believe the strings and p/u choice have a much greater impact on sound.
BTW Some guitars are accidentally great sounding regardless of $, or can be total dogs, according to a combination of all variables.
#24
Quote by kenfrazee@gmail
The construction does make a diff, granted, but I believe the strings and p/u choice have a much greater impact on sound.
BTW Some guitars are accidentally great sounding regardless of $, or can be total dogs, according to a combination of all variables.


you think luthiers don't know what their doing? they just wandering around in the dark hoping a good guitar comes out. you think they clap their hands and go yippie when something turns out right?

Some guitars built to a budget price point can sound good sure. Not one of them will ever sound as good as an anderson or a historic lp.

There's just a point where all the happy accidents in the world aren't going make up for the fact that the materials used in the construction and the details put into the making of one just completely lap the same qualities in the other.

Also like I said...until you've rolled the same pickups through several guitars of different price points...you don't really know. at all. nothing.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer