revolver92
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2010
480 IQ
#1
whats the typical range for tenors and baritones?

i read somewhere that you should sing your lowest note to find what type of voice you have, because it shows our natural lowest note and we cannot change the thickness of the vocal chords...

i dont know my highest notes, but my lowest note is probably A2(or A below low C)
sometimes its hard to go to A2 and i can only sing A#2. (Bb2)

and i found that baritones range is usually F2-F4.
tenors range is usually C3-C5 but sometimes tenors can go lower.

i think i am more like a tenor, my voice is not that deep, and i really cant sing those lower notes.

jesse mccartney is a tenor too, and he can go below that c3 as well. he hits A2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFcQWS_nmkM

and heres a vid where Adam Lambert (tenor) goes below that c3, he hits Bb2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bWzUOt6l-I&feature=related

so if i cant go lower than A2. AM I A TENOR?
i think if id be a baritone i could go a few notes lower..
what do you think?
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#2
To be honest, it's hard to tell without your top end. If you can hit a tenor B or C, then you're a tenor. If not, you could be a baritone.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
revolver92
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2010
480 IQ
#3
Quote by food1010
To be honest, it's hard to tell without your top end. If you can hit a tenor B or C, then you're a tenor. If not, you could be a baritone.


well, i can hit those notes, but im kind of straining. today i really found the sweet spot in my mix. and i even hit D above high c. but i cant hold these notes you know.
i just hit it with exercise like mum, mum, mum... i can hold tha B thou, lol but its really hard...its just that i have a bad technique and im still a beginner. lol

anyways, i think if id be a baritone i could sing lower than A... notes like (g2, f2)
even that low A is kind of hard for me...

i know this should be a different topic, but how to hold notes that are in my mix?? you know those high notes? sometimes my larynx goes up and its even harder. so any tips?

thanks for the answer!
food1010
Bassist
Join date: Jun 2007
1,660 IQ
#4
Quote by revolver92
well, i can hit those notes, but im kind of straining. today i really found the sweet spot in my mix. and i even hit D above high c. but i cant hold these notes you know.
i just hit it with exercise like mum, mum, mum... i can hold tha B thou, lol but its really hard...its just that i have a bad technique and im still a beginner. lol
Well, if you can really hit a D5, then you are absolutely a tenor.

Quote by revolver92
i know this should be a different topic, but how to hold notes that are in my mix?? you know those high notes? sometimes my larynx goes up and its even harder. so any tips?
It's all about keeping your throat relaxed, supporting your sound with your diaphragm, and directing your resonance (which kind of goes along with keeping your throat relaxed).

Here is a good video on how to support your sound with your diaphragm. Remember, you're not pushing with the diaphragm, you're mainly just using it as support for your sound.

As for resonance, you shouldn't be pushing your sound forward (or up, for that matter). It should be as light as possible (obviously within reason) and you should feel like your sound is filling the cavities in your head and escaping out of your forehead. You shouldn't feel like you're forcing it out of your throat.

Of course, this is head voice I'm talking about. You might want a bit more chest resonance to put some more power behind those high notes. The same basic principle still applies. Support with your diaphragm, don't force through your throat. Relax your throat so that it is able to open up, allowing the air to flow freely. The only difference really is that you should feel the resonance more in your chest cavities than in your head.

If you need anything clarified, don't hesitate to ask me.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
revolver92
Registered User
Join date: Oct 2010
480 IQ
#5
Quote by food1010
Well, if you can really hit a D5, then you are absolutely a tenor.

It's all about keeping your throat relaxed, supporting your sound with your diaphragm, and directing your resonance (which kind of goes along with keeping your throat relaxed).

Here is a good video on how to support your sound with your diaphragm. Remember, you're not pushing with the diaphragm, you're mainly just using it as support for your sound.

As for resonance, you shouldn't be pushing your sound forward (or up, for that matter). It should be as light as possible (obviously within reason) and you should feel like your sound is filling the cavities in your head and escaping out of your forehead. You shouldn't feel like you're forcing it out of your throat.

Of course, this is head voice I'm talking about. You might want a bit more chest resonance to put some more power behind those high notes. The same basic principle still applies. Support with your diaphragm, don't force through your throat. Relax your throat so that it is able to open up, allowing the air to flow freely. The only difference really is that you should feel the resonance more in your chest cavities than in your head.

If you need anything clarified, don't hesitate to ask me.



ill try to hold some lower notes first(g4,Ab4) and then try to go higher...
like i said, i hit that D with humming and then with exercises like mum, mum, mum, i hope ill be able to hold that note some day lol
ill look up some vids at youtube about supporting from diaphragm.

thank you very much!