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#41
Quote by MAC2322
Relatively although not entirely. The distance of stars can be calculated in various ways, with closer stars being measured through a parallax* and stars that are further away have to have their redshift, luminosity and size taken into account to calculate their distance.

*Parallax:

Look at something in your room that's a relative distance away. Close one eye. Now open it and close the other. See how it seems to move related to other objects? Your eyes use this difference to calculate how far away an object is, even if you don't notice it. The same thing is done with the Earth, with two pictures being taken six months apart (so that the Earth has changed place within it's orbit as much as possible) and then distance can be calculated with the two images.


EDIT:

V Sombrero Galaxy is one of my personal favorites.



That's amazing. Thanks for explaining. Now I can finally explain it to others when I tell them that the Earth can't be 6k years, stars are billions of lightyears away...
#42
Cg man16 just told me to watch that yesterday, got about halfway through and will finish up the rest...Eh, probably right now. I've got time. That was definitely one of my favourite quotes.


If I remember correctly, Magnus_Maximus posted that quote in the "epic quote thread"
#43
Quote by SaintsofNowhere
That's amazing. Thanks for explaining. Now I can finally explain it to others when I tell them that the Earth can't be 6k years, stars are billions of lightyears away...




That's what I'm here for. Also, if you've never watched Carl Sagan's 'Cosmos' or read the book, I highly suggest that you do. Filled with useful, interesting information about space.
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#45
Quote by Masamune
^Are you already going to university for astrophysics or just planning on doing so?


Graduated high school. I've applied to several colleges, but won't be getting definitive answers until late March or early April.
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#46
Quote by MAC2322
Graduated high school. I've applied to several colleges, but won't be getting definitive answers until late March or early April.

Oh ok. Good luck.
#47
Quote by Masamune
Oh ok. Good luck.


Thanks, mate. I'll post in this thread when I get results.
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#48
Shameless bump of my own thread.
Here's a quote I really like from Cosmos.
"And then, only a moment ago, some small arboreal animals scampered down from the trees. They became upright and taught themselves the use of tools, domesticated other animals, plants and fire, and devised language. The ash of stellar alchemy was now emerging into consciousness. At an ever-accelerating pace, it invented writing, cities, art and science, and sent spaceships to the planets and the stars. These are some of the things hydrogen atoms do, given fifteen billion years of cosmic evolution."
Last edited by Masamune at Feb 11, 2011,
#49
Here's to hoping this thread takes off

Has anyone else watched Stephen Hawking's Into the Universe?

I enjoyed it quite a bit, it wasn't so much "this is what we know," it was more really unique theories about everything which was pretty cool.
Quote by maidenrulz19
When playing any pokemon game and encountering a fisherman with 5 or 6 FUCKING MAGIKARP!!!!!!! I mean the thing is useless and it only gives like 7 exp points each. Yeah eventually that guy can have an army of gyarados but still.
#50
Quote by Sizzleby
Here's to hoping this thread takes off

Has anyone else watched Stephen Hawking's Into the Universe?

I enjoyed it quite a bit, it wasn't so much "this is what we know," it was more really unique theories about everything which was pretty cool.


Very cool video. I really enjoyed his time traveling theory.


I got a question for ya'll. I have this astronomy homework, and the teacher has NOT gone over this concept at all. Can anyone help me out?




Just # 18
#51
17 would be B, since it's spectrum is shifted such that wavelengths are longer (IE Red Shift), due to the Doppler effect, meaning it is moving away

18)

You first figure out the ratio of wavelengths between the two. Divide the recessing star's given wavelength by Vega's given wavelength (the numbers you're given), and subtract 1, to get a Z value.

You then use this Z value to calculate recessional velocity. Z is roughly equal to the recessional velocity of the object divided by the speed of light. Therefore multiply Z by your value of C to get the recessional velocity.

You will obtain answer B if I'm not mistaken.
Last edited by Dan_5893 at Feb 14, 2011,
#52
thank you sir! I hate the college education system, its like these professors just don't even care
#53
How'd the moon get there?

By the way. We have an awesome sky this week.

Tonight you'll wanna head outdoors around 10 p.m. local time and look for the sky’s fourth-brightest star rising in the east. That’s Arcturus, the luminary in the constellation Boötes the Herdsman. The easiest way to find Arcturus is to first find the Big Dipper, which tonight stands high in the northeast. Note that the Dipper’s handle is curved. Follow that curve downward and you’ll come to Arcturus. Because the handle’s curve is also part of a circle called an arc, use the old phrase, “Follow the arc to Arcturus,” to remember how to locate the orange star.

For Tuesday, Galileo Galilei was born on this day in 1564, and tonight you can replicate one of his most famous observations. Point a small telescope at Jupiter, which now stands only about 15° above the western horizon one hour after sunset. You’ll spot four bright points of light near the planet’s disk. Those are the four largest moons of Jupiter, and in honor of their discoverer, we still call them the Galilean satellites. Interestingly, at 9 p.m. EST, the four moons all lie on the west side of the planet.

Take your binoculars out on wednesday night and enjoy the Pleiades star cluster (M45), which will stand high in the sky as darkness falls. The Pleiades is the sky’s brightest star cluster and, at a distance of 440 light-years, also one of the closest to Earth. You can find M45 by drawing a line upward (to the northwest) from Orion’s Belt. Astronomers now assign this object a place within the constellation Taurus the Bull, but for some 15 centuries, ancient skywatchers considered the Pleiades a separate constellation. Begin observing it without optical aid. How many stars can you see? Most observers will spot six stars in the shape of a tiny dipper. (It’s not the Little Dipper, however. That’s in the northern sky.) Now look through binoculars at M45. Dozens of stellar fireflies swarm into view. And with sensitive cameras attached to the largest telescopes, astronomers have identified more than 1,000 cluster members in the Pleiades.

Thursday: All this week and next week when the Moon will rise much later, you can spot a little-seen solar system phenomenon called the zodiacal light. Wait about an hour after sunset until the last vestiges of evening twilight have disappeared. Then look toward the western sky for a faint glow starting at the horizon and proceeding upward in a rough triangular shape. If there’s a city in that direction, light pollution from it will outshine the zodiacal light, so seeing it takes a bit of positional luck. Dust spread throughout the plane of our solar system scatters sunlight, producing the zodiacal light. And although the dust creates a band across the entire sky, it’s brightest where the dust makes a small angle with the Sun. Remember, the zodiacal light is faint. If your site has any light pollution or the Moon is in the sky, you won’t see it.

Friday: Full Moon occurs at 3:36 a.m. EST. At that time, our nearest celestial neighbor will occupy a spot in our sky 180° from the Sun. But it won’t lie precisely across from the sun. If it did, nighttime observers would see a total lunar eclipse. Instead, this Full Moon sits roughly 7° north of the antisolar point — that point in space directly opposite the Sun as seen from Earth. The result? No eclipse but a brilliant Moon in front of the stars of Leo the Lion

Saturday, February 19
It’s quite a special week when it contains the birthdates of two of the top astronomers of all time. The second giant — Nicolas Copernicus — celebrates a birthday today. He was born in 1473. Just before he died in 1543, his work De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium appeared. In it, Copernicus correctly placed the Sun — not the Earth — at the center of our solar system. Think of him tonight as Saturn rises around 11 p.m. local time. In Copernicus’ day, Saturn was the farthest known planet from the Sun. It wouldn’t be until 1781 that English astronomer Sir William Herschel discovered Uranus.
Last edited by Twist of fate at Feb 14, 2011,
#57
Hmm.... so what's with that dark matter stuff?
Quote by maidenrulz19
When playing any pokemon game and encountering a fisherman with 5 or 6 FUCKING MAGIKARP!!!!!!! I mean the thing is useless and it only gives like 7 exp points each. Yeah eventually that guy can have an army of gyarados but still.
#58
Quote by Sizzleby
Hmm.... so what's with that dark matter stuff?

It's a mindfuck to me. Invisible, non-reactive "stuff" that has gravity and accounts for a huge chunk of the known universe? fuuuu
#59
Lol at the ghetto explanation of the planets.

I remember watching on the Discovery channel that scientists have actually developed a way to eventually colonize Mars, by using algae to eventually get a thick enough atmosphere to plant trees and eventually start creating a breathable atmosphere.

Granted, they said it would take hundreds of years and trillions of dollars.
#60
Quote by ethan_hanus
Lol at the ghetto explanation of the planets.

I remember watching on the Discovery channel that scientists have actually developed a way to eventually colonize Mars, by using algae to eventually get a thick enough atmosphere to plant trees and eventually start creating a breathable atmosphere.

Granted, they said it would take hundreds of years and trillions of dollars.


We better start now. Honestly, that would be incredible. Hundreds of years isn't too long.
Quote by blackflag49
Condoms, for all the copious amounts of pussy with which you will be inevitably bombarded from this moment onward.


#61
Quote by bingeandletgo
We better start now. Honestly, that would be incredible. Hundreds of years isn't too long.


I know, but we wont, we are to busy killing each other because someones always gota think they are some badass shit and start try to encroach on other people and enforce their will on them, cause they think they are more "right".
#62
Quote by ethan_hanus
Lol at the ghetto explanation of the planets.

I remember watching on the Discovery channel that scientists have actually developed a way to eventually colonize Mars, by using algae to eventually get a thick enough atmosphere to plant trees and eventually start creating a breathable atmosphere.

Granted, they said it would take hundreds of years and trillions of dollars.


It's called 'Terraforming' and yes, it is being researched. However, the problem is a bit more complex than you're making it seem. You don't just need at atmosphere in order for us to live. In addition to creating an oxygen-rich atmosphere with a high enough pressure, we would also need a way to have water on Mars. Not only that but we also have to figure out a solution to the problem of gravity, since the gravity on Mars is drastically different (lower, in this case) to that on Earth. Not to mention several other aspects that may affect the way we life, such as the axis tilt of the Earth and the magnetic poles, both of which would be significantly more difficult to correct on Mars than anything else.

But it certainly is an interesting prospect. I hope is happens someday.
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#63
Quote by MAC2322
It's called 'Terraforming' and yes, it is being researched. However, the problem is a bit more complex than you're making it seem. You don't just need at atmosphere in order for us to live. In addition to creating an oxygen-rich atmosphere with a high enough pressure, we would also need a way to have water on Mars. Not only that but we also have to figure out a solution to the problem of gravity, since the gravity on Mars is drastically different (lower, in this case) to that on Earth. Not to mention several other aspects that may affect the way we life, such as the axis tilt of the Earth and the magnetic poles, both of which would be significantly more difficult to correct on Mars than anything else.

But it certainly is an interesting prospect. I hope is happens someday.


They talked about genetically modifying the plants to the situation on Mars. For water, they talked about purposely crashing meteors with high water content into Mars. And it's been proven that there used to be water on Mars do to the erosion channels that look very similar to the river erosion found on Earth. The water prolly evaporated after the planets core became cold, and lost it's magnetic field.

There are plenty of plants on Earth that can thrive in environments with very little sunlight and extremely cold temperatures.

That's what I remember from the documentary.
#64
Quote by MAC2322
It's called 'Terraforming' and yes, it is being researched. However, the problem is a bit more complex than you're making it seem. You don't just need at atmosphere in order for us to live. In addition to creating an oxygen-rich atmosphere with a high enough pressure, we would also need a way to have water on Mars. Not only that but we also have to figure out a solution to the problem of gravity, since the gravity on Mars is drastically different (lower, in this case) to that on Earth. Not to mention several other aspects that may affect the way we life, such as the axis tilt of the Earth and the magnetic poles, both of which would be significantly more difficult to correct on Mars than anything else.

But it certainly is an interesting prospect. I hope is happens someday.


Well, of course it's complex. There are probably thousands of factors determining how well we survive. I wonder how well we could adapt to Mars over time, given the chance to get up there and not die. It would be interesting to see how/if we kind of turn into a different race/species/what have you (over a LONG period of time of course).
Quote by blackflag49
Condoms, for all the copious amounts of pussy with which you will be inevitably bombarded from this moment onward.


#65
Quote by maidenrulz19
When playing any pokemon game and encountering a fisherman with 5 or 6 FUCKING MAGIKARP!!!!!!! I mean the thing is useless and it only gives like 7 exp points each. Yeah eventually that guy can have an army of gyarados but still.
#67
Remarkable indeed. If only the natives would leave them alone.

Seriously though, Mars would be a great place to live. I could see America just sending all the black people there once they take over the world.

Okay super serious now, I imaging we'd end up living in domes. It seems like it would be easier to mess with the atmosphere inside a controlled dome than messing with the atmosphere of an entire planet.
Quote by maidenrulz19
When playing any pokemon game and encountering a fisherman with 5 or 6 FUCKING MAGIKARP!!!!!!! I mean the thing is useless and it only gives like 7 exp points each. Yeah eventually that guy can have an army of gyarados but still.
#68
Quote by Sizzleby


Okay super serious now, I imaging we'd end up living in domes. It seems like it would be easier to mess with the atmosphere inside a controlled dome than messing with the atmosphere of an entire planet.

My thoughts exactly. Get out of my mind.
#69
Allow me to start with this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oY59wZdCDo0&feature=player_embedded

Best short YouTube video I've seen in a while.

--------------------------------------------

I also hope this thread takes off. I'm a huge proponent for space. I have a huge amount of stake in it, too!

Why, you ask? I work in the aerospace industry! In past experience (while I was a student at the University of Colorado) at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colorado, I did mission operations for the Kepler Mission, among others. Now, I work as a full-time professional for the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California; I work with the Mars Rovers, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey 2001, the Spitzer mission, and some other smaller missions. I'm right there in the dirty.

(Consider this one of those... "Ask me anything" posts! If you want. I'm pretty narcissistic.)

to this thread, bros and hoes.
Looking for my India/Django.
#70
Quote by redwing_suck
Allow me to start with this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oY59wZdCDo0&feature=player_embedded

Best short YouTube video I've seen in a while.

--------------------------------------------

I also hope this thread takes off. I'm a huge proponent for space. I have a huge amount of stake in it, too!

Why, you ask? I work in the aerospace industry! In past experience (while I was a student at the University of Colorado) at the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colorado, I did mission operations for the Kepler Mission, among others. Now, I work as a full-time professional for the Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California; I work with the Mars Rovers, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey 2001, the Spitzer mission, and some other smaller missions. I'm right there in the dirty.

(Consider this one of those... "Ask me anything" posts! If you want. I'm pretty narcissistic.)

to this thread, bros and hoes.


Is the telescope I posted a link for any good? Can you locate a better beginner's scope on that site?



Sanity is not statistical
#71
My greatest regret is probably the fact that I won't be alive to experience space colonization and travel to the outer reaches of the universe.
#72
Quote by hriday_hazarika
My greatest regret is probably the fact that I won't be alive to experience space colonization and travel to the outer reaches of the universe.


+1. There is so much to see that we will never see.
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#74
Quote by hriday_hazarika
My greatest regret is probably the fact that I won't be alive to experience space colonization and travel to the outer reaches of the universe.

That does suck. One of the things I'd most like to see is how far our technology actually takes us. At least we were lucky enough to have been born in a time period where we are getting to see it take off but there's so much further it can go and we're only experiencing such a small part of it.

Often times, I find removed from the pace that technology is advancing itself. It'll be supported by generations upon generations of intelligence and all we'll do is contribute to a very small part of it and be done with.

Hopefully they unlock the key to immortality before I pass
Quote by maidenrulz19
When playing any pokemon game and encountering a fisherman with 5 or 6 FUCKING MAGIKARP!!!!!!! I mean the thing is useless and it only gives like 7 exp points each. Yeah eventually that guy can have an army of gyarados but still.
#76
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2oXFWKpJiA&feature=related

Great clip- more/less a sequel to the one above. Absolutely magnificent, and very intruiging. It makes me kinda sad that we"ll probably wipe ourselves off the radar before we realize how insignificant we actually are. Get off your high horse already.

Related: how has nobody posted this yet?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSgiXGELjbc&feature=related

I love it. <3
#77
Quote by hriday_hazarika
My greatest regret is probably the fact that I won't be alive to experience space colonization and travel to the outer reaches of the universe.


You can't really regret something you have no control over. I am, however, sad that I will miss so many huge moments in civilisation's evolution.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#78
I recommend you all read the book "The Black Cloud" by Sir Fred Hoyle
My God, it's full of stars!
#79
Quote by Todd Hart
You can't really regret something you have no control over. I am, however, sad that I will miss so many huge moments in civilisation's evolution.

I think about that too much.
Oh well.
#80
Quote by Dreadnought
I recommend you all read the book "The Black Cloud" by Sir Fred Hoyle


Is that the novel about a superorganism that resembles a cloud in space that stumbles upon our galaxy?
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.