Page 3 of 11
#81
Quote by Todd Hart
Is that the novel about a superorganism that resembles a cloud in space that stumbles upon our galaxy?


Yup.

Impressive, young grasshopper
My God, it's full of stars!
#82
Quote by Dreadnought
Yup.

Impressive, young grasshopper


Well as a person bordering on obsessed with literature and the sciences it was really required reading. I enjoyed that book, despite its more serious undertones (likely trying to present Hoyle's universal models in a more accessible way, something more scientists should try to do) the way the cloud behaved and communicated put me in mind of Douglas Adams and other more abstract authors. I loved the cloud's shock at the fact there was life on a planet, not in space.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#85
Quote by Low_End_Rocker
Is the telescope I posted a link for any good? Can you locate a better beginner's scope on that site?

I say to you what I say to everyone I know trying to get into astronomy, don't buy a scope first buy some decent 20x50 binoculars, they're easier, cheaper and can be just as satisfying.
"Loathe metaphors. Pander to undereducated masses. Get doctorate, have a real conversation" Mordin Solus
#86
Ok, look at this picture. What do you see? Lots of galaxies, with some at weird angles?



See the ones around the edges of the center of the picture? That's one galaxy. Gravity is bending the light causing it to appear at multiple places in multiple positions. It's called gravitational lensing.



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_lensing

Blow anyone's mind? Because it did mine when I heard about it .
#87
^^ Learned about that in Astronomy class. Very interesting indeed.
"The future's uncertain, and The End is always near."
-Jim Morrison
#88
Measuring distances in astronomy is a super-interesting subject! I would like to add another method, because parallax only gets you so far. (It only works for nearby objects, as you get farther away from what you're looking at, the relative difference in position goes to 0)

Specifically, you can use the so-called Cepheid stars as a "standard candle" to measure distance.

The term "standard candle" can be explained as follows:
Imagine a candle. You roughly know how bright that candle actually is, so when you see a candle in a certain distance, you can approximately derive that distance from comparing the apparent brightness of the candle to its actual brightness as perceived from a very short distance (which you know, because, well it's a frickin candle! ). You can certainly tell a difference if a candle is standing 10 meters or 50 meters from you.

Hence, if you had a celestial object with a known actual brightness, you can always compare that value to its apparent brightness in pictures and hence deduce its distance. Now how do we know the actual brightness of any celestial object?
Well, here, the cepheid stars come into play.

A cepheid variable star is a very bright star, which pulsates (hence "variable") at a very specific rate. The reason for this is that the ion layer surrounding the star absorbs its light and heats up and expands into space, cools down, becomes transparent again, and falls back, gets ionized and intransparent, heats up and so on. How violently this process takes place clearly depends on the actual brightness of the star, and indeed, a clear relation between both has been found. Therefore, if you find a cepheid star in another galaxy, you can measure its period of oscillation, derive its actual brightness, compare it to its apparent brightness and deduce the distance!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cepheid_variable

I am really interested in cosmology. I recommend Simon Singh's "The Big Bang" as a light reading, he also explains the thing about measuring distances really well.

"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move."
#89
Can anybody recommend some good books on the subject. Also, any thoughts on Ancient Astronaut Theory?
Quote by Owenlee55
Well, my penis smells of fecieas and my anus smells of semen...
#90
Quote by DavidBuchanan
Also, any thoughts on Ancient Astronaut Theory?

It's a bunch of pseudo-scientific hooey. It's not in any way a theory, it's barely even an hypothesis.
#91
Quote by T.s.e
It's a bunch of pseudo-scientific hooey. It's not in any way a theory, it's barely even an hypothesis.

I have a friend who buys into a lot of that stuff. Every time I mention that it's probably BS he just says "Well, we'll never know".
#92
Quote by Masamune
I have a friend who buys into a lot of that stuff. Every time I mention that it's probably BS he just says "Well, we'll never know".

Hence, pseudo-science. Tell him you're convinced he doesn't exist, and if he argues say "well, we'll never know"

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#93
Quote by SteveHouse
Hence, pseudo-science. Tell him you're convinced he doesn't exist, and if he argues say "well, we'll never know"

I've already said similar things. It just ends up with a flustered look and changing of the subject.
#97
I tried to watch the first episode but got bored and stopped about 10 minutes in :/



stratkat
#98
Thought this would give some of you guys something to think about

its a video from the University of Arizona about The Bang Bang and the Origins of the Universe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NRhVcTTMlrM&feature=player_embedded

Skip to around 45:05 for a trippy ass view of the universe as we know it

and skip to 53:00 for another trippy ass zoom in of the universe from the cosmos to quarks
#100
I agree!

I really want to get more into cosmology, it's very fascinating... If only there were any classes on that at my university! :/

Anyhow to contribute some links:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMaTyg8wR4Y
http://www.phdcomics.com/comics/archive.php?comicid=1430
http://www.mpa-garching.mpg.de/galform/millennium/
"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move."
#102
Me and my girlfriend just purchased a 300mm newton with a 1500mm F (a sky watcher) on a motorized goto equatorial mounting Im still kinda in awe of the whole situatuion we are picking it up on saturday and hopefully testing it out on sunday We are gonna make some amazing photos with this baby

The telescope in question:
http://www.astroshop.eu/skywatcher-telescope-n-304-1500-pds-explorer-bd-neq-6-pro-synscan-goto/p,19173
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#103
Quote by gorkyporky
Me and my girlfriend just purchased a 300mm newton with a 1500mm F (a sky watcher) on a motorized goto equatorial mounting Im still kinda in awe of the whole situatuion we are picking it up on saturday and hopefully testing it out on sunday We are gonna make some amazing photos with this baby

The telescope in question:
http://www.astroshop.eu/skywatcher-telescope-n-304-1500-pds-explorer-bd-neq-6-pro-synscan-goto/p,19173


Sounds amazing! Unfortunately, the sky where I live is way too bright and polluted to observe interesting stuff.. :P

I don't remember where that was, but once in school we made a field trip to an observatory where we had a look at saturn and its rings. Only watching these pictures on my computer screen makes all the objects out there seem that much more elusive, to the point where I almost forget that they are really out there. Such a weird feeling!
"In the beginning the Universe was created. This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move."
Last edited by keinerniemand at Jun 28, 2011,
#104
Luckily, its not that pluted here, and i have mountains close by, where i can spend the night in a cabin, so i pretty much have optimal conditions to observe and to top it off, we can also observe at my girls place, from open plains away from civilization
Joža je kul. On ma sirove z dodatki pa hambije.
#109
Quote by Ostinattos
I really like this video and every time something like this comes up I post it hopefully it will be appreciated here:


http://vimeo.com/22956103


Wow, I thought that was amazing. I really don't know what else to say...
#110
Quote by daytripper75
This is relevant: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/


I visit that site daily.

Anyone using Android: There's an app that automatically downloads the APoD and can set it as your wallpaper. I wake up to a new stunningly beautiful pic of the Universe errday

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#111
^ Fukkin' downloaded
Last edited by Erik_Aero at Jun 28, 2011,
#112
Awesome thread.

Have been into Astronomy for a few years now and was lucky enough to do an Astronomy course at uni (did as an elective in my Engineering degree).

Not sure if anyone here uses the Planetarium program called 'Stellarium'.

If not, download here: Stellarium

Epic program, set your location and it gives a live view of the sky from your location. Click on objects in the sky for details such as magnitude, distance, coordinates in sky etc.

Cheers,
Luke
#113
Anyone see the James May programme about the universe the other day?

I'm not in the UK, so could only see it on iPlayer (which incidentally only works in the UK too, but of course there are ways to get around that >.>

I got lost many times, watching it, and it was only a basic intro to the universe, I think

Loads of moments, watching it. Like upon hearing that the light that gets to us from the sun is potentially millions of years old
#114
Yay a new thread to hang out in. I'll post some stuff... maybe. Otherwise I'll just lurk...

Cephied Variables FTW!
It didn't take long to realise
The safest place was not her arms, but her eyes
Where she can't see you
For her gaze, it blisters;
Grey skin to cinders
#115
Quote by LukeyEL
Awesome thread.

Have been into Astronomy for a few years now and was lucky enough to do an Astronomy course at uni (did as an elective in my Engineering degree).

Not sure if anyone here uses the Planetarium program called 'Stellarium'.

If not, download here: Stellarium

Epic program, set your location and it gives a live view of the sky from your location. Click on objects in the sky for details such as magnitude, distance, coordinates in sky etc.

Cheers,
Luke

More Android, but this is pretty similar. Hit up the market for Google Sky Map. I don't know how much info it might give you about what you're looking at, but it will tell you what you're looking at. You can even look at the night sky on a any given nights using the Time Travel feature. It's pretty neat shit brah.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#116
Quote by SteveHouse
More Android, but this is pretty similar. Hit up the market for Google Sky Map. I don't know how much info it might give you about what you're looking at, but it will tell you what you're looking at. You can even look at the night sky on a any given nights using the Time Travel feature. It's pretty neat shit brah.


A mate of mine has Google Sky on his smartphone. The only benefit it has over Stellarium (that im aware of) is the ability for you to move your phone around and it moves the field of view depending on where your phone is facing, this only works when running the program on a mobile phone of course.

You can move into different points in time in Stellarium also. Furthermore, you can change your location to other planets, so you can visualise the night-sky (including Earth) from another planet. Very cool

I haven't really used Google Sky much though, but on first impressions i prefer Stellarium, just seems to be more informative.

Both are very good programs though
#117
Quote by LukeyEL

You can move into different points in time in Stellarium also. Furthermore, you can change your location to other planets, so you can visualise the night-sky (including Earth) from another planet. Very cool

Whoa.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#118
I've always wondered about the whole speed of sound/light thing

If the moon was to blow up for example, how long would it be before we saw it had disappeared,, because I assume that it would still be there for a while even after it had blown up?

Also, if an astronaut travelled to the moon, and the returned and looked on the moon with the best telescope ever ever, would he be able to see himself? isn't that time travel?
#119
Quote by mikeyknowsbetter
I've always wondered about the whole speed of sound/light thing

If the moon was to blow up for example, how long would it be before we saw it had disappeared,, because I assume that it would still be there for a while even after it had blown up?

Also, if an astronaut travelled to the moon, and the returned and looked on the moon with the best telescope ever ever, would he be able to see himself? isn't that time travel?

1. It takes a tiny amount of time for light to travel between the moon and here. We wouldn't notice a difference if we knew there was one.

2. What? No. Explain.

[IN PHIL WE TRUST]


Quote by Trowzaa
I only play bots. Bots never abandon me. (´・ω・`)

#120
Oh thank god I found this thread. I'm was born April 15 so I'm an Aries right?

what are my inherent Aries traits?
Quote by guitarxo
I had a dream about your avatar once, so yes of course.

Quote by Bladez22


every time i see that twirling electrode avatar of yours I know that the post is worth reading or the link is worth clicking