Page 4 of 16
#121
My grandmother just had surgery this past week, so she was unable to cook for this weekend when the family was coming over. So since I'm on spring break, I cooked.

Last night, I grilled up a huge slab o' steak. The way I marinade is to stab it all over with a fork, pour some meat tenderizer on there, and then drizzle some Coke (the drink, not the drug) on there and rub it in. It dissolves the meat tenderizer and gets it further into the meat. Then I put barbecue sauce in a Ziploc, put the meat in, made sure the sauce was evenly dispersed, and let it marinade overnight. I grilled it to a perfect medium rare. Perfect grill marks. I'd have taken pictures for you guys, but my family's religious

I did the same thing with some dark meat chicken. It was a weird ass cut, but whatever.

I also made jambalaya. Basically, it's rice, tomato paste, canned crushed tomatoes, sausage, chicken, onlon, bell pepper, cayenne pepper, and some other stuff. It was awesome.

And for dessert, I made a blueberry pie with a graham cracker crust. I can't tell you the recipe, because it's my own secret recipe that I've never seen anywhere else, but I made a lemon-blackberry-mango sauce to top it with, and it was fan****ingtastic.
#122
Why does the oil need to be hot anyway?

Quote by Tupu
Thanks for the replies.

My sauce will just be cream and this seasoned cheese and seasonings. As for the veggies, I will bake them in the oven.

It's most likely that the food is not ready when everyone get's home. Should I remove the steaks from the pan when they are ready and place them in the oven with the vegetables and keep the sauce in the pan?

EDIT: So the food is ready and in the oven waiting for the rest of our family. And the steaks... well... I think that either the first three we're done in too high heat. I had the pan as hot as it could be, and that resulted in some dark char in the steaks. Here and there. I lowered the heat a little for the rest of the steaks.

For the sauce, I just added cream and the cheese and seasoned with an african peppermix. I think it was decent. I'm a fan of good sauces, but suck at making them...


Quote by Ikey
inspired by the steak recipes i made steak and chips and now sitting in the glorious sun listening to summer music drinking cider and eating steak

just crushed some peppercorns mustard shallots and butter as sauce.

EDIT: im so happy right now

Awesome guys
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#123
Quote by Kensai
Why does the oil need to be hot anyway?

because of science!

No seriously, something about chemicals and proteins, the temperature of stuff and something like that. My ex (chemistry student), despite not being able to cook to save her life, explained it to me once, but I forgot.
#124
Quote by CoreysMonster
I disagree; the oil can be hot enough to sizzle because of the water, but since it's just a couple of little drops, it can very well be that the drops sizzle, but the meat only fizzles when you put it in - which means it's not quite hot enough yet.

Your method works too, but I think mine is better.


The oil shouldn't just sizzle, oil droplets should literally jump up. But I grill my steak like a real man, so I don't even care

Plus, the meat will only fizzle if it's not at room temperature, which is how your steak should be.

Pro tip (I ****ing love saying that): I've tested this out and it works. If you have a thin piece of meat to cook on a grill or in a pan and you want it medium rare, keep it cold before you cook it. That way the middle takes longer to heat through while the outside can get a nice char/crust.
#125
Quote by trueamerican
The oil shouldn't just sizzle, oil droplets should literally jump up. But I grill my steak like a real man, so I don't even care

Plus, the meat will only fizzle if it's not at room temperature, which is how your steak should be.

I learned how to cook in a real kitchen and that tip came from a real chef so there

And by fizzle I meant, instead of that nice PFSSSHHT sound you should get when you put the meat in, you get a little fffffzzt. you also get that when the oil isn't hot enough.
#126
Quote by Kensai
Why does the oil need to be hot anyway?


To achieve the Maillard reaction, the oil needs to be hot. If it isn't, the proteins won't retract from the meat and it will stick to the pan like brown on a black person.

Also, there's a common misconception that you need to sear meat to "seal in the juices."

NOT TRUE

Searing seals in no more juice than any other form of cooking. HOWEVER, the only reason your meat might be juicier if you sear it is because you cooked it on a higher heat. The juiciness of meat is determined by fat content, age, and how long it was cooked. If you sear it, you're cooking on a higher heat, which means it's cooking for less time.
#127
Hah all this steak talk. I'm about to cook some steaks, I'm the worst cook ever though so I'm going to completely destroy them and make them taste like old shoes I expect. I will give a few of these tips a go though, I won't be holding my breath...
#128
Quote by CoreysMonster
I learned how to cook in a real kitchen and that tip came from a real chef so there

And by fizzle I meant, instead of that nice PFSSSHHT sound you should get when you put the meat in, you get a little fffffzzt. you also get that when the oil isn't hot enough.


My parents are both great cooks. My mom used to own a cake delivery service. I learned to grill at 4, and my grandmother is a great cook too. Plus, we had cable, so Food Network was available. I have more experience cooking than many chefs and experiment a lot more than many chefs.

I bake without recipes. That's how much of a badass I am
#129
Quote by trueamerican
To achieve the Maillard reaction, the oil needs to be hot. If it isn't, the proteins won't retract from the meat and it will stick to the pan like brown on a black person.

Sounds like bro-science.
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#130
Quote by trueamerican
My parents are both great cooks. My mom used to own a cake delivery service. I learned to grill at 4, and my grandmother is a great cook too. Plus, we had cable, so Food Network was available. I have more experience cooking than many chefs and experiment a lot more than many chefs.

I bake without recipes. That's how much of a badass I am

Well there goes my cooking ego

Time to build it up with some post-run spinach and porkchops!

EDIT: ^ wtf is bro-science?!
#131
Quote by CoreysMonster
Well there goes my cooking ego

Time to build it up with some post-run spinach and porkchops!

Nice man. I'm doing bacon-wrapped porkchops again (on account of buying 2 kg of porkchops and still having bacon that expires soon).

Doing these with them, they're the ones on the left. Do other countries have these? They're basically potatoes in a spherical shape. Tastes great.



Quote by CoreysMonster
Well there goes my cooking ego

Time to build it up with some post-run spinach and porkchops!

EDIT: ^ wtf is bro-science?!

Science by bros. These guys:

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#133
Quote by trueamerican

Yeah I know, but if you didn't know meat will turn brownish regardless if the oil is pre-heated or not.
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#134
Quote by Kensai
Yeah I know, but if you didn't know meat will turn brownish regardless if the oil is pre-heated or not.


True, but the Maillard reaction isn't about browning, it's about the different flavor that results from quick caramelization.
#135
^

I will bear all of your bro-science in mind... What else can I do to get a nice steak?

The packaging says fry it for 15-20 mins... surely not? I thought you just cook steak for a short amount of time so it's still juicy?
#136
i used my left over steak from lunch and shredded it for a stir fry for dinner.
and im still drinking nice cider but the sun has gone down now.
time to look out for that supermoon


Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
^

I will bear all of your bro-science in mind... What else can I do to get a nice steak?

The packaging says fry it for 15-20 mins... surely not? I thought you just cook steak for a short amount of time so it's still juicy?

i do a miniute or two on each side then turn the heat down and leave for bout 6 min. so when you poke it keeps the imprint for a while.
now extra flamey
Last edited by Ikey at Mar 19, 2011,
#137
Quote by trueamerican
True, but the Maillard reaction isn't about browning, it's about the different flavor that results from quick caramelization.

I'm about to make porkchops, I can try the pre-heat oil thing and see if I notice a difference.
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
^

I will bear all of your bro-science in mind... What else can I do to get a nice steak?

The packaging says fry it for 15-20 mins... surely not? I thought you just cook steak for a short amount of time so it's still juicy?


Season it. I like black pepper on the sides. Gives it a nice look. I don't keep track of the time at all when frying stuff, it's ready when it looks ready.
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#138
^ It came pre-seasoned with pepper so I suppose that will help. I'll just have to use the "when it's done it's done" intuition I seem to have been born without and let you know how it goes
#139
Well when it's on fire it's definitely been in too long.
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#141
So i am thinking about grilling up some burgers soon. Im think about trying something new and making spicy burgers... Im thinking about cutting up some fresh jalapenos and maybe another spicy pepper or something and taking some shredded chedder and putting them into the burger meat before i cook them. Then im going to grill them up put some cheese on them and some tomatoes and onions. How does that sound
#142
Steak is super easy to cook. It won't kill you as easily as say undercooked Chicken would.

Cut it open if you're not sure. Medium-rare owns all.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

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#144
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
^ It came pre-seasoned with pepper so I suppose that will help. I'll just have to use the "when it's done it's done" intuition I seem to have been born without and let you know how it goes


Here's a really useful way to test if your meat is done. Press your index finger into the meat. If you experience a lot of resistance, your meat should have already been taken off and is overcooked. If you get a little resistance, it's about medium rare. If you get no resistance, it's raw.

No, here's how you define resistance. Hold your hand up. When you mush the fleshy thumb area that should be how a rare steak feels. When you touch your thumb to your index finger, that's medium rare, thumb to middle finger is medium, thumb to ring finger is medium well, and thumb to pinky is WHY THE **** WOULD YOU RUIN A PERFECTLY GOOD STEAK!
#145
Quote by !jared!
So i am thinking about grilling up some burgers soon. Im think about trying something new and making spicy burgers... Im thinking about cutting up some fresh jalapenos and maybe another spicy pepper or something and taking some shredded chedder and putting them into the burger meat before i cook them. Then im going to grill them up put some cheese on them and some tomatoes and onions. How does that sound
The best burgers I've ever made involved worcerstershire (sp?) sauce, your favorite hot sauce, chopped onions, garlic powder, salt, and pepper mixed in to the meat. Make slim patties (small enough that 2 of them makes a patty of your liking). Put cheese on a patty. put another patty on cheese. cook in pan.

throw jalapenos and moar hot sauce on top.

The cheese melts in the burger and keeps it hot and cools down the tastebuds with all the hot sauce. it's just amazing

Edit: putting the wrong kind of cheese in your meat or in to the wrong kind of meat could mean the cheese melts while cooking it on the grill. that may make for a dirty grill. be prepared.
“Science cannot solve the ultimate mystery of nature. And that is because, in the last analysis, we ourselves are part of nature and therefore part of the mystery that we are trying to solve.”


-Max Planck

☮∞☯♥
Last edited by metal4all at Mar 19, 2011,
#146
Quote by !jared!
So i am thinking about grilling up some burgers soon. Im think about trying something new and making spicy burgers... Im thinking about cutting up some fresh jalapenos and maybe another spicy pepper or something and taking some shredded chedder and putting them into the burger meat before i cook them. Then im going to grill them up put some cheese on them and some tomatoes and onions. How does that sound


Sounds good, but be careful. Separate the meat into two patties of equal size (use the lid to a jar of mayonnaise or something) and put the components you want to stuff the burger with in the middle, and put the other patty on top. If you don't keep it in the middle, you won't be able to close the patties together.
#147
I forgot to post this before. I just ate one of the best salads I've ever had. I made it. It's an Asian grilled chicken salad (grilled chicken with salad, not mashed up chicken with mayo).

The salad consisted of lettuce, cucumber, craisins, Mandarin oranges, chopped mango, canned crushed pineapple that I cooked down in a pan, almonds, homemade pickled red onion, the grilled chicken, and the dressing (best dressing I've ever had).

The chicken has to be thin, so pound it out and slice it. The marinade for the chicken was Asian inspired. I improvised a lot, do what you like. Basically, you need some form of sesame oil, soy sauce, and either rice vinegar or sake. Some people in my family hate vinegar, so I used sake. Add some scallions and whatever else you want. I added a lot, but make your own recipe.

Marinaded it overnight, grilled it.

NOTE: when grilling this, you don't want it to be juicy because of all of the fruit in the salad and the dressing. If you pounded it out correctly this shouldn't be an issue, but I like to overcook it a tiny bit to the point where you can shred the chicken if you want to.

The dressing was a challenge, because most of the people who would be eating the salad don't like vinegar. So I improvised with some olive oil, soy sauce, honey, chili flake (this dressing was a bit spicy), toasted sesame oil, orange pepper, sugar, sake, and some other stuff. Whisked it all together, let the flavors marry, and it was amazing.

And for the pickled red onion, do it to your tastes. I did almost equal parts rice vinegar to water (more vinegar though) and added some sugar. I did it on Wednesday so I'd have time to adjust the flavor. The longer this sits, the better it gets, so don't worry about freshness.


The beauty of this salad is that it hit every flavor. Sour from the red onion, pineapple and a bit from the orange, savory from the chicken, sweet from the fruit, bitter from the red onion, spicy from the dressing, and salty from the soy sauce in the dressing and marinade. As long as your flavors are balanced and you don't **** up the proportions, this salad is incredible. My carnivore brother devoured two huge plates of it.


EDIT: and if you're a vegetarian, the salad totally works without the chicken. Add in something with protein, like chickpeas (love them) and you've got a vegetarian salad with protein that's absolutely delicious.
Last edited by trueamerican at Mar 19, 2011,
#148
Quote by trueamerican
Tons. What do you like?

I like stuff with a bit of an ethnic flair. I also like stuff with baked tofu or tempeh
e-married to Jack (bladez)
#149
Quote by ESPLTDV401DX
I like stuff with a bit of an ethnic flair. I also like stuff with baked tofu or tempeh


The recipe I posted above will work. Yes, it's a salad, but it's sooo different from a typical one. Add some chickpeas and some grilled and marinaded tofu and you're fine.

Also, check out Chana Masala. It's a vegetarian Indian chickpea dish that's full of protein and flavor. Nothing goes better with some naan. Aloo Chaat is a vegetarian Indian dish. Also delicious. I know about these because there are a few vegetarian Indian restaurants near me that I've been to. I've never actually cooked any of these dishes because I don't want to stink up my county, but I know they're delicious. I rarely make Indian food.

Red beans and rice is a pretty awesome Cajun dish, and you can make that vegetarian. Just use google to get a recipe.

Also, I've made mashed potato sliders with a tamarind sauce and green chutney. I basically make mashed potatoes (they have to be thick), separate into slider sized disks, and refrigerate for at least 4-6 hours. Then fry in at least 1/2 inch of oil. Brown on both sides and make sure it's heated through and fried to perfection. Place on small potato buns (slider size). Then add tamarind sauce and chutney to taste. Scarf them down.

Look up recipes for the chutney and tamarind sauce online. I don't deviate too far from them because I don't have the greatest knowledge of Indian flavor profiles. I'm good at fusion food, but purely Indian, I have very little experience.
#150
I posted in here yesterday, but apparently I didn't...

Anyways, I believe I asked for easy recipes for a teenager who pretty much has to fend for himself and has very little in terms of ingredients.

(It's me, by the way)
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#151
Quote by Snowman388
I posted in here yesterday, but apparently I didn't...

Anyways, I believe I asked for easy recipes for a teenager who pretty much has to fend for himself and has very little in terms of ingredients.

(It's me, by the way)


I guess I'd go with soups or stews in your case. Can you give me some basic ingredients that you have around the house so I can give/make you recipes?

Also, how much cooking experience have you had? Because if I'm going to make a recipe for you without trying it first, I'll only be able to give you approximate amounts and you'll have to taste and adjust, taste and adjust, taste and adjust until you get it right. Are you capable of doing that?
#152
Quote by Snowman388
I posted in here yesterday, but apparently I didn't...

Anyways, I believe I asked for easy recipes for a teenager who pretty much has to fend for himself and has very little in terms of ingredients.

(It's me, by the way)

Things like pasta are normally fairly easy to make. Chili con carne is too, basically just mix everything up in a bowl and cook it.
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#153
Sorry if this is out of place, but does anyone have a good recipe for Peanut Butter Fudge?
Again my apologies if this isn't the best place/thread to ask this.
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#154
Quote by trueamerican
I guess I'd go with soups or stews in your case. Can you give me some basic ingredients that you have around the house so I can give/make you recipes?

Also, how much cooking experience have you had? Because if I'm going to make a recipe for you without trying it first, I'll only be able to give you approximate amounts and you'll have to taste and adjust, taste and adjust, taste and adjust until you get it right. Are you capable of doing that?


I am actually not bad at cooking. I cook a mean Pad Thai, and green curry. However, don't have the ingredients

I could definitely do that. That's why I like cooking for myself, it tastes how I want it to taste.
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#155
Quote by lefthandedkid
Sorry if this is out of place, but does anyone have a good recipe for Peanut Butter Fudge?
Again my apologies if this isn't the best place/thread to ask this.


It's the cooking thread, isn't it?

The way I do it is to make some simple syrup and bring it to a boil. Then I add condensed milk and peanut butter/chocolate (the ingredients you want to melt into the fudge and flavor it). You need a thermometer for this, because you need to get it to around 235 degrees. Stir constantly to avoid burning the bottom, and every so often take a wet pastry brush and drizzle drops of water down the side of the pot to prevent sugar crystals from forming.

When it reaches 235 degrees, remove from heat and let cool for about 15 minutes until it reaches 110 degrees. Then add any dry ingredients you want (fruit, nuts, etc.) and stir it for a while, until it sets up and becomes a dull color and is really stiff. Pour it into a greased pan and let it sit for hours.

You can also make a bunch of different kinds and layer them, provided the flavors work well. I made a peanut butter and jelly fudge. I made peanut butter fudge and poured that into a pan. I let it cool for a bit, and then poured raspberry jelly judge I had just made right over the top. As long as you let the bottom layer cool, it totally layers correctly. And I crushed up some pretzels and potato chips and put them in the middle. It was awesome.
#156
Quote by Snowman388
I am actually not bad at cooking. I cook a mean Pad Thai, and green curry. However, don't have the ingredients

I could definitely do that. That's why I like cooking for myself, it tastes how I want it to taste.


But what basic ingredients do you have around the house? I can't suggest anything without knowing what you're working with.
#157
Quote by trueamerican
But what basic ingredients do you have around the house? I can't suggest anything without knowing what you're working with.


Yeah, sorry, I just came back remembering I forgot to tell you. We sometimes have some basic vegetables, ground beef, we seem to have lots of pasta and some canned stuff. A lot of spices and herbs, though.
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#158
Quote by trueamerican
It's the cooking thread, isn't it?

The way I do it is to make some simple syrup and bring it to a boil. Then I add condensed milk and peanut butter/chocolate (the ingredients you want to melt into the fudge and flavor it). You need a thermometer for this, because you need to get it to around 235 degrees. Stir constantly to avoid burning the bottom, and every so often take a wet pastry brush and drizzle drops of water down the side of the pot to prevent sugar crystals from forming.

When it reaches 235 degrees, remove from heat and let cool for about 15 minutes until it reaches 110 degrees. Then add any dry ingredients you want (fruit, nuts, etc.) and stir it for a while, until it sets up and becomes a dull color and is really stiff. Pour it into a greased pan and let it sit for hours.

You can also make a bunch of different kinds and layer them, provided the flavors work well. I made a peanut butter and jelly fudge. I made peanut butter fudge and poured that into a pan. I let it cool for a bit, and then poured raspberry jelly judge I had just made right over the top. As long as you let the bottom layer cool, it totally layers correctly. And I crushed up some pretzels and potato chips and put them in the middle. It was awesome.


That is a different method that I used to do, I wish I could remember the recipe. I remember that it needed margarine/butter, peanut butter, chocolate and vanilla, but not the measurements or time. I also remember melting the chocolate, margarine/butter and peanut butter in a bowl via microwave for easier making. then putting it the refrigerator.

For your method, what is the measurements?
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Last edited by lefthandedkid at Mar 20, 2011,
#159
Quote by lefthandedkid
That is a different method that I used to do, I wish I could remember the recipe. I remember that it needed margarine/butter, peanut butter, chocolate and vanilla, but not the measurements or time. I also remember melting the chocolate, margarine/butter and peanut butter in a bowl via microwave for easier making. then putting it the refrigerator


If you use condensed milk, you don't need butter. Vanilla's a nice touch, but the barebones fudge doesn't demand it.

I made this awesome mint chocolate chip fudge. Bottom layer: chocolate. I used creme de cacao and Ghirardelli semi-sweet chocolate as the flavoring component. I let it cool and put some chocolate chips on top. Then I poured on the mint layer. I used creme de menthe and fresh mint as the flavoring components. Also, I let some mint steep in sugar, so the oils of the mint leaf would flavor the sugar. It was delicious.

EDIT: Correction: you still need butter, but you don't need to add it until near the end.
Last edited by trueamerican at Mar 20, 2011,
#160
I have no exact measurements. But I made this amazing peanut butter/chocolate/marshmallow fudge.

Melt down peanut butter, corn syrup, sugar, and brown sugar in a pot on high heat. Once they melt down, add chocolate chips and marshmallows. Keep stirring. I added peanuts (I prefer mine without the shells ). Once everything melts, keep stirring until it thickens up some more. Then pour into a pan and stick it in the fridge.

I have no measurements as this is my own recipe. The only thing I can tell you is that no one flavor should be the star of the show. Peanut butter shouldn't be the main flavor, nor should chocolate, and nor should marshmallow. They should all be co-stars. But obviously, you can change the recipe however you want. It works regardless. Just make sure to use enough corn syrup, because contrary to popular belief it isn't any worse for you than sugar, and it prevents sugar from crystallizing and making the fudge grainy.

For this, you don't need a thermometer and it's a lot easier as quicker than regular fudge. However, it isn't the same as regular fudge. It's a bit softer and stickier, but for the easiness, I think it's totally worth it.

Also, if you use semi-sweet chips (which I do anyway because of the added sugar and brown sugar) you can make this non-dairy, which is great for vegans and those who are lactose intolerant.