Page 5 of 16
#161
You have a ton of fudge recipe idea's, awesome! What would you say a good measurement would be for the basics of chocolate, peanut butter, margarine/butter/condensed milk for a family of 4?
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
#162
Quote by Snowman388
Yeah, sorry, I just came back remembering I forgot to tell you. We sometimes have some basic vegetables, ground beef, we seem to have lots of pasta and some canned stuff. A lot of spices and herbs, though.


I'd imagine you're sick of pasta. I would be. You can make your own tomato sauce. And if you can make your own tomato sauce, you can make your own tomato soup. It's pretty easy.

Boil tomatoes and peel them. Take the seeds out if you want. I don't care enough too, unless I'm cooking for others. Cook them down along with whatever spices/herbs you want and whichever vegetables you want. You can add a mirepoix if you want, etc. People don't realize that tomato sauce and tomato soup are pretty damn similar.

You can make chili. Saute some onions, saute some ground beef. Put both in pot. Add tomato paste, crushed tomatoes and whatever spices you want. Let it cook for a while. A while=as long as you want it to, but at least 2 hours.

I posted a more complex chili recipe earlier in this thread, and I posted a few more simple recipes that I'm too lazy to look for, but the chili one is a good one. This is more simple.

Make some burgers. But the way to differentiate them is to work on making different sauces and garnishes for the burger. So if you have onions, celery, bell peppers, and scallions, chop them all up and make a vegetable stir fry with some hoisin to put on top of a burger. If you have dried fruit, reconstitute them in some water in a pan, add some cream and cinnamon, nutmeg, and curry powder, cook it down, and top the burger with that.

Be as imaginative as possible. Beef can go with more than you think. Make the sauce taste good, and if it doesn't go well with burger, use it the next meal on some pasta instead.
#163
Quote by lefthandedkid
You have a ton of fudge recipe idea's, awesome! What would you say a good measurement would be for the basics of chocolate, peanut butter, margarine/butter/condensed milk for a family of 4?


For which kind? The kind that requires a thermometer and boiling and complicated stuff? Or my easy fudge that isn't really fudge?

Note: I use the faux fudge as a topping for rice krispy treats. I just don't thicken it as much and put it top and let it cool. Best rice krispy treats ever, no joke.

Also, I don't know how much your family eats, so I can't tell you. Do you want a pan of the stuff? A 9x16 pan? 8x8? Is it only for one meal, or do you want leftovers? I can give you comparative measurements (like 1 part X to 2 parts Y) for sure.
#164
Lets say a standard 8x8 pan, I imagine just increasing the measurements just a touch would be enough to make it a 9x16
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
#165
Quote by lefthandedkid
Lets say a standard 8x8 pan, I imagine just increasing the measurements just a touch would be enough to make it a 9x16


Aight, so an 8x8 pan is about 3 inches deep. You don't want it completely full, so let's say we want it filled up 2/3 of the way, which is 2 inches, okay? That's 128 cubic inches.

But still, which kind of fudge do you want? Standard peanut butter fudge fudge? Or easy fake fudge?
#166
for this case, lets go with easy fridge fudge, either way, they're both delicious
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
#167
Quote by trueamerican
I'd imagine you're sick of pasta. I would be. You can make your own tomato sauce. And if you can make your own tomato sauce, you can make your own tomato soup. It's pretty easy.

Boil tomatoes and peel them. Take the seeds out if you want. I don't care enough too, unless I'm cooking for others. Cook them down along with whatever spices/herbs you want and whichever vegetables you want. You can add a mirepoix if you want, etc. People don't realize that tomato sauce and tomato soup are pretty damn similar.

You can make chili. Saute some onions, saute some ground beef. Put both in pot. Add tomato paste, crushed tomatoes and whatever spices you want. Let it cook for a while. A while=as long as you want it to, but at least 2 hours.

I posted a more complex chili recipe earlier in this thread, and I posted a few more simple recipes that I'm too lazy to look for, but the chili one is a good one. This is more simple.

Make some burgers. But the way to differentiate them is to work on making different sauces and garnishes for the burger. So if you have onions, celery, bell peppers, and scallions, chop them all up and make a vegetable stir fry with some hoisin to put on top of a burger. If you have dried fruit, reconstitute them in some water in a pan, add some cream and cinnamon, nutmeg, and curry powder, cook it down, and top the burger with that.

Be as imaginative as possible. Beef can go with more than you think. Make the sauce taste good, and if it doesn't go well with burger, use it the next meal on some pasta instead.


Thank you, I love you. I'm not sick of pasta, I think I phrased that wrong. We have a lot of pasta here, but never actually cook it.

I love pasta, any suggestions for good sauce?
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#168
Quote by lefthandedkid
for this case, lets go with easy fridge fudge, either way, they're both delicious


I don't know what easy fridge fudge means so I'm just going to give you the instructions for a few kinds.

Easy peanut butter fudge that you can do on the stove or the microwave:
About a pound of peanut butter chips
About half a stick of butter
A can of condensed milk (I think they come in 12-14 oz. cans?)

I prefer doing this on the stove, because you're less likely to burn the chocolate. You can use the double boiler system to melt everything or not. I do. So fill a pot with cold water, and put it on a high flame to boil. Then take another pot that will fit on top of the boiling pot and put it on there. Presto! A double boiler!

Anyway, put all the ingredients in. When it's melted and hot and utterly smooth, pour into a buttered 8x8 pan/tin and let it cool. I let it cool for an hour before putting it in the refrigerator.

Stove faux peanut butter-chocolate-marshmallow fudge:
This is a ratio recipe for me.
2 parts peanut butter
2 parts corn syrup (I use white)
1 part brown sugar
1 part sugar
2 parts semi-sweet chocolate chips
And then add as many marshmallows and peanuts as you want.
I don't use butter and cream in this because I don't always want it to be dairy, but .5 parts of butter and a few tbsps of cream wouldn't go amiss here.

The recipe is easy to remember. Basically, melt everything in a pan together, then add the solid ingredients, like nuts. You can also add some marshmallow fluff instead of marshmallows. I'd do .5 parts, or 1 part maximum.

When everything's melted, pour into buttered pan. Cool. What I do when the fudge is half solidified, but still a little liquid, I put some peanuts, chocolate chips and marshmallows on top. Then before I serve, I use a torch to toast the marshmallows. Amazing.

Classic peanut butter fudge:

For a more classic approach that still isn't too much of a pain in the ass:

1 part butter
4 parts brown sugar
1 part milk
2 parts peanut butter
6 parts powdered sugar
vanilla

Melt the butter in a pan on medium heat. Add brown sugar and milk, bring to a hard, rolling boil, and stir for a few minutes. Remove from heat and add peanut butter and vanilla. Pour into a bowl containing the powdered sugar and beat it all together. Put in 8x8 buttered pan/tin. Chill.

I would think that in this case, for an 8x8 pan, 1/2 cup butter, 2 cups, brown sugar, 1/2 cup of milk, 1 cup of peanut butter, and 3 cups of powdered sugar should work.
#169
Quote by trueamerican


Classic peanut butter fudge:

For a more classic approach that still isn't too much of a pain in the ass:

1 part butter
4 parts brown sugar
1 part milk
2 parts peanut butter
6 parts powdered sugar
vanilla

Melt the butter in a pan on medium heat. Add brown sugar and milk, bring to a hard, rolling boil, and stir for a few minutes. Remove from heat and add peanut butter and vanilla. Pour into a bowl containing the powdered sugar and beat it all together. Put in 8x8 buttered pan/tin. Chill.

I would think that in this case, for an 8x8 pan, 1/2 cup butter, 2 cups, brown sugar, 1/2 cup of milk, 1 cup of peanut butter, and 3 cups of powdered sugar should work.


Holy crap! That is pretty much the recipe I was thinking! only instead of using a stove you throw the butter and peanut butter in a bowl, stuff it in the microwave until they melt, and mix everything together, put the mixture in the pan, chill then serve! Only I added in some chocolate and melted it in with the peanut butter.


Also, thank you so much, I have been wanting to make Peanut Butter Fudge again for a long time
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
Last edited by lefthandedkid at Mar 20, 2011,
#170
Quote by Snowman388
Thank you, I love you. I'm not sick of pasta, I think I phrased that wrong. We have a lot of pasta here, but never actually cook it.

I love pasta, any suggestions for good sauce?


What do you like when it comes to pasta sauce? Are you more of a tomato guy, cream guy, spinach cream guy, cheese guy, etc.

I like combining different countries in my pasta dishes. I've made spaghetti with tomato sauce and cheese. But the way I did it combined Spanish cuisine with Mexican and Italian.

I made a Mexican queso, using milk, butter, flour, cheddar, pepperjack, and chopped jalapenos. I made a Spanish tomato soup by blanching the tomatoes, peeling them, and then adding them to a pan where I had already sweated down some onion with garlic. Add some spices, like cumin and black pepper, and add more garlic (I like this soup to have some garlic and black pepper spiciness from having so much of them) and cook it down. Cook it down as far as you want. And I boiled some spaghetti.

I poured the soup over the spaghetti, and the queso over the soup. It was incredible.


You can also make alfredo sauce. It's a little more hands on.

An easy-ass "sauce"/topping to make for pasta that totally works is to saute some onions in olive oil. When they've sweated a bit, add some sliced mushrooms. Cook it all down as far as you want. Add some fresh mozzarella if you want, but it's not necessary. Just pour over pasta and you're good to go. You can also add cream/milk to the mushroom/onion ragout and reduce it further, adding salt, black pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and some other more adventurous ones like ginger if you like. Parmesan would also be great.
#171
Quote by lefthandedkid
Holy crap! That is pretty much the recipe I was thinking! only instead of using a stove you throw the butter and peanut butter in a bowl, stuff it in the microwave until they melt, and mix everything together, put the mixture in the pan, chill then serve! Only I added in some chocolate and melted it in with the peanut butter


Go nuts man. I haven't made fudge in a while, but my last experimentation with fudge was liquor. And I'd put sauces in between the layers. I made a chocolate fudge layer with creme de cacao, and then put a sauce on top that I made from mango and creme de cassis. Then a mint layer on top with some creme de la menthe. But this time, I added some Bailey's to the mint layer instead of just milk. It was pretty amazing, I won't lie.
#172
Quick question, how much vanilla would you say would be good? 2 teaspoons?
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
#173
Quote by lefthandedkid
Quick question, how much vanilla would you say would be good? 2 teaspoons?


In my experience, there really is no such thing as too much vanilla. As long as you put in the vanilla while the fudge is still hot, it's fine. It'll cook off the alcohol no problem. You could use 4 teaspoons if you want. Depends how vanilla-y you like it. I don't measure. I probably use between 2 and 3. Possibly less if I feel like it.

EDIT: no such thing as too much, WITHIN REASON. Pouring a whole bottle in=too much. But doubling the amount is fine. Don't worry.
#174
Alright, I do believe fudge experimentation will begin soon, thanks again!
Quote by theogonia777
Lefthandedkid is super awesome, ja?



Quote by rgrockr
I guess fire extinguishers have to be filled with something other than fire retardant now, because apparently that's offensive.


Watch my stream?
#176
Woah, you Americans really butcher fudge.

A good recipe is an equal ratio of sugar to thick cream, boiled up until the soft ball stage and then cooled. None of your microwave stuff
#177
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Woah, you Americans really butcher fudge.

A good recipe is an equal ratio of sugar to thick cream, boiled up until the soft ball stage and then cooled. None of your microwave stuff




Yeah, I hate microwaves with a passion. But for someone who is a self-professed shitty cook, I don't know that I should listen to you

But the reason not to have equal parts of sugar to cream is that many people like to add flavorings, and that affect the balance of the sugar/cream ratio.
#178
Quote by trueamerican
What do you like when it comes to pasta sauce? Are you more of a tomato guy, cream guy, spinach cream guy, cheese guy, etc.

I like combining different countries in my pasta dishes. I've made spaghetti with tomato sauce and cheese. But the way I did it combined Spanish cuisine with Mexican and Italian.

I made a Mexican queso, using milk, butter, flour, cheddar, pepperjack, and chopped jalapenos. I made a Spanish tomato soup by blanching the tomatoes, peeling them, and then adding them to a pan where I had already sweated down some onion with garlic. Add some spices, like cumin and black pepper, and add more garlic (I like this soup to have some garlic and black pepper spiciness from having so much of them) and cook it down. Cook it down as far as you want. And I boiled some spaghetti.

I poured the soup over the spaghetti, and the queso over the soup. It was incredible.


You can also make alfredo sauce. It's a little more hands on.

An easy-ass "sauce"/topping to make for pasta that totally works is to saute some onions in olive oil. When they've sweated a bit, add some sliced mushrooms. Cook it all down as far as you want. Add some fresh mozzarella if you want, but it's not necessary. Just pour over pasta and you're good to go. You can also add cream/milk to the mushroom/onion ragout and reduce it further, adding salt, black pepper, paprika, garlic powder, and some other more adventurous ones like ginger if you like. Parmesan would also be great.


I like most sauces, but nothing to tomato-ey. I'll try some of these recipes!!! I'm excited!
Quote by Athabasca
My ex did the same. Cheated on me and then acted like I'd given her sister a facial. Women are retarded.
#179
Quote by Snowman388
I like most sauces, but nothing to tomato-ey. I'll try some of these recipes!!! I'm excited!




Good luck man. I'm spoiled in that when I'm home, I have an abundance of options of what to cook (as long as I tell someone to buy some ingredients), although I do have to cook kosher

Had some barbecue today
#180
Quote by trueamerican
The recipe I posted above will work. Yes, it's a salad, but it's sooo different from a typical one. Add some chickpeas and some grilled and marinaded tofu and you're fine.

Also, check out Chana Masala. It's a vegetarian Indian chickpea dish that's full of protein and flavor. Nothing goes better with some naan. Aloo Chaat is a vegetarian Indian dish. Also delicious. I know about these because there are a few vegetarian Indian restaurants near me that I've been to. I've never actually cooked any of these dishes because I don't want to stink up my county, but I know they're delicious. I rarely make Indian food.

Red beans and rice is a pretty awesome Cajun dish, and you can make that vegetarian. Just use google to get a recipe.

Also, I've made mashed potato sliders with a tamarind sauce and green chutney. I basically make mashed potatoes (they have to be thick), separate into slider sized disks, and refrigerate for at least 4-6 hours. Then fry in at least 1/2 inch of oil. Brown on both sides and make sure it's heated through and fried to perfection. Place on small potato buns (slider size). Then add tamarind sauce and chutney to taste. Scarf them down.

Look up recipes for the chutney and tamarind sauce online. I don't deviate too far from them because I don't have the greatest knowledge of Indian flavor profiles. I'm good at fusion food, but purely Indian, I have very little experience.

Thanks man. I had Chana Masala today.
e-married to Jack (bladez)
#181
Quote by ESPLTDV401DX
Thanks man. I had Chana Masala today.


Awesome. Did you make it yourself?

Also, you should just generally look at Indian and Asian food. As a general rule, their food is vegetarian because they are historically very poor nations, and as a result their cuisine has been designed for meat, chicken, pork, and fish to be luxuries rather than necessities.

Even though Japan eats more fish than anyone else
#182
Quote by trueamerican
Awesome. Did you make it yourself?

Also, you should just generally look at Indian and Asian food. As a general rule, their food is vegetarian because they are historically very poor nations, and as a result their cuisine has been designed for meat, chicken, pork, and fish to be luxuries rather than necessities.

Even though Japan eats more fish than anyone else

Yeah I made it myself. It was actually really good. I will definitely look at more Asian food. Thanks
e-married to Jack (bladez)
#184
Quote by JDizzle787
I made scrambled eggs the other morning with a teensy bit of garlic powder and with a teensy bit of olive oil in the pan. I was very surprised at how good it tasted.


Almost whenever I make scrambled eggs, I use garlic powder, salt, black pepper, crushed red pepper, and some oregano. On toast with butter and ketchup, it's delicious.
#185
Quote by trueamerican
Almost whenever I make scrambled eggs, I use garlic powder, salt, black pepper, crushed red pepper, and some oregano. On toast with butter and ketchup, it's delicious.


Sounds so, although I'm not sure about the ketchup part- not a fan of eggs and ketchup
#186
Quote by JDizzle787
Sounds so, although I'm not sure about the ketchup part- not a fan of eggs and ketchup


I gotcha. I'm generally not a ketchup guy. I like them with eggs, fries, onion rings and the like, but I feel that it generally overpowers whatever food it's put on without adding to it. A good sauce should complement the food without overpowering it.
#187
By the way guys, I just remembered this awesome BBQ sauce recipe my grandfather showed me a while back. Raspberry vodka, orange juice, and a ketchup based barbecue sauce (like KC Masterpiece). Spicy barbecue sauce can work. Just use what you like.

Mix it together and reduce it over the stove to your desired thickness. It's good.
#188
Its amazing what a couple of spices can do to eggs.

Anywho, I'm cooking a salmon and eggplant curry tonight. It looks fairly easy and I'll let you guys know how it went later.
So come on in
it ain't no sin
take off your skin
and dance around in your bones

#189
Quote by trueamerican


Yeah, I hate microwaves with a passion. But for someone who is a self-professed shitty cook, I don't know that I should listen to you

But the reason not to have equal parts of sugar to cream is that many people like to add flavorings, and that affect the balance of the sugar/cream ratio.



Haha, I suck at cooking meals, I'm actually epic at baking, I don't know why.

I made my family some batches of fudge and toffee for Christmas, as well as these Finnish pipari gingerbread I am like forced to make


The secret with fudge, alongside adding very little in flavouring - maybe some vanilla but the clotted cream provides most of the flavour - is to stir it as it cools. Commercial fudge is smooth and different-tasting to authentic west country fudge because of this. Stirring while cooling makes it crumbly and delicious.
#190
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
Haha, I suck at cooking meals, I'm actually epic at baking, I don't know why.

I made my family some batches of fudge and toffee for Christmas, as well as these Finnish pipari gingerbread I am like forced to make


The secret with fudge, alongside adding very little in flavouring - maybe some vanilla but the clotted cream provides most of the flavour - is to stir it as it cools. Commercial fudge is smooth and different-tasting to authentic west country fudge because of this. Stirring while cooling makes it crumbly and delicious.


Stirring while it cools is called beating it. I'm very aware of the technique. However, I disagree with your statement. I think you should add exactly as much flavoring as you like. You like very little, so add very little. My tastes are more varied. I can appreciate a simple fudge, as well as a peanut brittle and salted caramel custard fudge.

And the reason you're good with baking is that it's easy as **** (no offense). You follow directions to the letter and it works. When it comes to other forms of cooking, it's more nuanced. You have to be able to tell when it's done, rather than just sticking a toothpick into a cake to see if it's still liquid. There is NO excuse for not being able to bake.

The only time baking becomes skillful is when you start making your own recipes. The first cake recipe I ever made was for a blueberry cake. Rather than using milk, I used orange juice. I added some cranberries and lemon zest, and played around a bit with the ratio of dry to wet ingredients and reduced the amount of sugar because I don't like my desserts too sweet. It was amazing. (by the way, I highly recommend substituting OJ for milk in fruit cakes.)
#191
Quote by trueamerican

The only time baking becomes skillful is when you start making your own recipes. The first cake recipe I ever made was for a blueberry cake. Rather than using milk, I used orange juice. I added some cranberries and lemon zest, and played around a bit with the ratio of dry to wet ingredients and reduced the amount of sugar because I don't like my desserts too sweet. It was amazing. (by the way, I highly recommend substituting OJ for milk in fruit cakes.)

recipe please. Never heard of using OJ instead of milk and am now very curious as to how it would work. I imagine it would make the cake sweeter.

Salmon and Eggplant Curry. Oh my God this was delicious! I was really worried while making it that it wouldn't work out as I kept getting worried about various things here and there but my family was very happy with it and so was I. It wasn't as creamy as I thought it would be, probably because I cooked the sauce too long, but it was delicious nonetheless.

Recipe as follows:

Ingredients
Oil- you will need a fairly large amount as eggplant literally absorbs oil. I recommend olive oil as its a little healthier than other oils, but whatever works for you I guess.
1 Eggplant- Recipe said to use 6 baby eggplants, but one eggplant cut into strips worked fine too.
1 cup coconut cream (or milk).
2 kaffir lime leaves, finely chopped
2 tablespoons green curry paste
4 salmon steaks. You can cut these into strips if you want, but whole steaks worked just fine for me


Heat oil in frying pan and cook eggplant pieces in batches until golden brown. Remove eggplant and set aside to drain of oil.

Combine coconut cream, lime leaves and curry paste in a saucepan over medium heat. Stir until it boils, reduce heat and simmer for 5 minutes.

Cook salmon in the coconut sauce for a few minutes on each side. Don't get worried if its a little under cooked, rather that than over cooked. Place salmon aside. Add eggplant to the sauce, stir and simmer for a few minutes. Serve eggplant on top of salmon (or next to it, whatever floats your boat) and with rice (and lime wedges and probably some more vegetables seeing as how this recipe uses little in the way of vegetables).

In the end I had to use more than 1 cup of coconut cream because by the time I had finished the fish there was no sauce left for the eggplant. I just poured in the rest of the tin (about half a cup), added a little more curry paste and then added the eggplant.
While cooking I was also very worried about the fish being too underdone as the recipe I followed says only to cook for 1 minute on each side. I left them for longer which is probably why the sauce didn't last.

In the end it was yummy, probably not healthy due to the eggplant absorbing oil and the coconut cream but still highly recommended.
So come on in
it ain't no sin
take off your skin
and dance around in your bones

#192
I've never had a fish curry before. Sounds awesome. But wouldn't the salmon have no texture if it was just cooking in the sauce? I'd at least want to just sear it beforehand and then finish cooking in the sauce

Anyway, for the blueberry cake, this is the original recipe I used (awesome recipe actually, doesn't need that much playing around with. Also, this site is a goldmine) http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/Melt-In-Your-Mouth-Blueberry-Cake/Detail.aspx

But use OJ instead of milk, and I promise you it will be amazing. The color will be different, it will smell more fragrant and taste better.
#193
I'd like some basic info on the various types of cooking food, especially with a pan.

EDIT: nevermind, wikipedia seems to be quite factual.
Fight the evolution, play large intervals!
Last edited by Tupu at Mar 21, 2011,
#194
Quote by Tupu
I'd like some basic info on the various types of cooking food, especially with a pan.

EDIT: nevermind, wikipedia seems to be quite factual.


Okay. If you want something explained to you more personally, colloquially, and in depth (about technique and advice, not history and science) than Wikipedia, just ask.
#195
okay people, I have 500 grams of squid sitting in my kitchen defrosting.

What the hell do I do with it?

I also have a whole wolf bass, but I'm gonna freeze it and save it for tomorrow.
#196
This thread is pretty much pure win for me, as I have to move away from home come fall, so I need to get some epic cooking skills by then. I'm thinking I could maybe cook something tomorrow for our family, as I have no school. Suggestions what to do?
Fight the evolution, play large intervals!
#197
Quote by CoreysMonster
okay people, I have 500 grams of squid sitting in my kitchen defrosting.

What the hell do I do with it?

I also have a whole wolf bass, but I'm gonna freeze it and save it for tomorrow.

How do you find these things?
████████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
█████████████████████████
██████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
███████████████████████████
#198
Quote by CoreysMonster
okay people, I have 500 grams of squid sitting in my kitchen defrosting.

What the hell do I do with it?

I also have a whole wolf bass, but I'm gonna freeze it and save it for tomorrow.


So you have 1.1 pounds of squid

I've never cooked squid before. I say make some fried calamari. Make sure not to fry for longer than 2 minutes or it'll get tough (I've eaten it in restaurants and sent back more than my fair share of tough calamari).

Eat it with some thousand island dressing, some tartar sauce, and some marinara.
#199
Quote by Tupu
This thread is pretty much pure win for me, as I have to move away from home come fall, so I need to get some epic cooking skills by then. I'm thinking I could maybe cook something tomorrow for our family, as I have no school. Suggestions what to do?


What do you have in the house? What do you like? Is anyone in your family vegetarian? Do you need an easy recipe? Can your taste buds be trusted?
#200
^ what about some kind of squid risotto.

not a massive fan of seafood myself.
im thinking sausages with honey and mustard coating with carrot mash tonight.
now extra flamey