#1
Hey folks!

I've listened to a lot of shredders at Youtube lately, and I found out that I wanna learn A7Xs Scream Solo. Its pretty damn hard cause its all picked

I dont want you guys to have to look through the whole song to find it, so I'll link a video of this dude, he plays it pretty much perfect! (Well, not as good as Syn, but you get it).
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LSD7lN9w9yI

Any tips on how to improve my speed picking so I can do that?
Thanks
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#2
slow it down and practice it, then speed it up a little. Practice some more. Rinse. Repeat.
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#3
SPEED is a byproduct of ACCURACY
ACCURACY is a product of nailing it 100% correctly at slower speeds and then slowly getting faster.

Use a metronome. There's an online version HERE
#4
Quote by Silent Murder
SPEED is a byproduct of ACCURACY
ACCURACY is a product of nailing it 100% correctly at slower speeds and then slowly getting faster.

Use a metronome. There's an online version HERE


this is a good way of putting it into words. everyone has a limit of how fast they can play with it still being accurate; when you play with a metronome and make sure you don't half-ass any accuracy, you improve that limit, therefore meaning you can play faster. takes patience, but without even realizing it you get more accurate whenever you spend time working with exercises with a metronome
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#5
Guitar techniques will help you more than musician talk

I'm not saying it to be a pain, you'll get better answers there.
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#6
The way you actually hold your pick is a big part of it too. I've noticed when I hold my pick at an angle, and with high in my fingers (only a little of the end of the picking poking out of my fingers), I can play a little faster as opposed to holding the pick normally.
#9
To play quickly you need to:
1. Ensure your technique is efficient. This means minimal finger and hand movement. The less distance everything moves, the more likely it will be that it can do it quickly.

2. Ensure you play with minimal effort. A lot of players (me included!) get into the habit of tensing a little during fast passages. Unfortunately this is completely counter productive. The tight muscles restrict the fingers ability to move freely. A big part of my practice these days involves monitoring the tension in my hands/arms/etc and actively working to reduce it. The goal for me is to play with such a light touch during fast passages that if I went any lighter the notes actually wouldn't sound correctly.

3. Practice, practice, practice. When you get tired of this, practice. To play things quickly you really need to over learn things. As learning progresses the brain progressively starts to assume responsibility for executing the movement(s). Have a think about when you walk. There is no conscious 'left leg, right leg' dialog going on in your head. Walking wasn't something you were born with the ability to do, it is a skill you have acquired through practice. However it is so over practiced that you do it now without any conscious thought or effort. In the same way, to play things quickly we have to practice them to a point where the brain automatically does the bulk of the work. This takes a considerable amount of effort over a long period.

In the initial stages of learning you will need to focus on complete accuracy. In this first stage the brain is trying to get a clear picture concerning what you are trying to do: what finger, what fret, down stroke or upstroke etc. etc.. Playing too quickly in this initial stage slows learning. Why? The thing you are practicing is never really played the exact same way twice, due to the mistakes that are invariably made. So, one time through the brain thinks they are trying to play this, the next time it is slightly different, so the brain thinks they are trying to play that, and so on.

Later in learning it is important to focus on the physical feeling of playing the thing you are trying to learn. Generally we tend to stare at our fretboards when practicing. However this visual information isn't really used by the brain as it learns. Proof of this can be seen in the capabilities of blind musicians, who by and large play just as well as those with sight. If you focus on the physical feeling of playing you are much closer to the 'language' the brain uses in learning. This works in well with the idea of monitoring tension so that you play with minimal effort too.

Practicing with a metronome is also a great idea. One with a speed trainer is ideal. Send me a PM if you would like a link to the one I use.
Last edited by andrew_k at Mar 16, 2011,
#12
Yeah, referring to your post.

You should prolly keep a link to it because if you stick around this forum you'll end up reposting that advice a billion times, and it's easier to copypaste.
#13
Quote by Freepower
Yeah, referring to your post.

You should prolly keep a link to it because if you stick around this forum you'll end up reposting that advice a billion times, and it's easier to copypaste.


Or just keep "read the stickies" on your ctrl+V
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