#2
If it's a small acoustic group, then you pretty much stick a mic in front of it (oversimplified). If it's a bigger band, you might have feedback problems.
music = happiness

THAT IS IRRELEVANT TO THE CONVERSATION... unless you want to make it relevant
#3
Mic placement works best aimed towards the neck joint, sometimes at a 45 angle...Some people like it more behind the bridge to get a woody sound. Never place it directly infront of the sound hole unless ya want an over wooooofy boomy tone.

Small acoustic gigs can get away with a condenser, but dynamic mics are safer, especially with bigger gigs. Sound hole pickups are a great alternative aswell.

I've mic'ed live with an SM57 with great results.

but ya got to stay in one place so i dont like to use Mics anymore.
#4
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
but ya got to stay in one place so i dont like to use Mics anymore.


I absolutely agree with this. Whilst miking up your guitar may achieve the best sound possible, it's extremely limiting to have to stand in one place, making sure your guitar is the same distance away from the mic as when you did your soundcheck.

Other than that, just, err, mic it up, like you do with the voice.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#6
Quote by azianmusician19
If it's a small acoustic group, then you pretty much stick a mic in front of it (oversimplified). If it's a bigger band, you might have feedback problems.


+10000

My guitar messed up before a gig and wouldn't work in an amp, so I used a mic infront of my guitar and it sounded fine
#7
If you look at pros who are playing acoustics in concert, you'll see (generally) two types. Guys who are in a band context with a lot going on on stage will generally use a pickup=equipped guitar or an acoustic-electric model. Often with a wireless system... It's just so much more convenient.
Guys who use mics are generally doing a solo or maybe a duo where they can just sit and pick and the audience doesn't expect a lot of jumping around.

More than a few "traditional" bluegrass groups are going back to the "one-mic' setup with each player going forward to play breaks into the mic and then fading back when they're done... This requires a bit of choreography and practice. As Earl Scruggs said... "You could get killed."