#1
Hi!

Okey, I know there are tons of threads like this out there, but my question/problem is kind of different. I couldn't really find any answers to this. So here it goes:

My problem is actually not the common "string noise", but an unwanted power chord sounding when I pick single notes. Let's say I pick A 12th fret then D 9th fret, the second note rings out together with the first note which creates a power chord type of sound. How is the proper way to pick and release? I never really noticed I had problem with this until I started to play more progressive stuff. I didn't really pay attention to this while I was fooling around with thrash metal songs.

The funny thing is that I tried really f*cking slow, going from a string to another, trying different techniques, and I always get that power chord sound. It sounds correct maybe 1 out of 10 tries. I just can't figure out the theory behind it. How do I get the second note ring out on it's own? What's the secret?

Thanks!
#2
lift your finger off of the note you fretted 1st
ProTone Pedals: Attack Overdrive
Fractal Audio: AxeFX 2
Engl: Fireball 60
Zilla: Fatboy 2x12
Carvin: DC700
Carvin: Vader 7
Schecter: KM-7 MKii
Schecter: Banshee 8 Passive
Jackson: DK2M
#3
Just takes lots of practice man. I remember when I first started and it took me awhile to be able to change strings properly.
Quote by C O B H C
If you want to get really technical about it..

1. Grab sticks.
2. Bang sticks on drums.


^how to play drums.


UG POKER
#4
Quote by pigeonmafia
lift your finger off of the note you fretted 1st


That's how I do, but still get the noise.

Yellowshirtguy: Heh, yeah, I know that practicing is the key to everything, I'm just trying to figure out how it works, or suppose to work in theory.
Last edited by MetalMullet at Mar 15, 2011,
#5
try lifting your finger enough that the note is no longer fretted, but your finger still touches the string.
Does that solve your problem?
#6
First thing to do is to make sure you're releasing the fret properly, you don't want to be generating noise as you remove your finger. Practise just playing the note and then relaxing your finger until the note dies, you may have to do this very slowly at first.

Second, use your palm to mute. The same part of your hand that you use to palm mute should touch all the strings below the one you're playing very lightly (when I say below, I mean pitch wise, so if you're playing the A string, your palm touches the low E). You want to make sure you're not pushing down or restricting your hand's motion, just touch enough to make the strings sound dead.
This point of contact moves as you change strings, so if you're playing the A string, you'll be muting the low E and then when you move to the D string, your palm will also move down to mute both the low E and the A strings.
Speed is a by-product of shut the fuck up.
#7
Well, if you're playing the 12th fret on the A string, then the harmonic is probably just ringing out. Happens to me all the time on frets that have natural harmonics.

Quote by Aleksi
First thing to do is to make sure you're releasing the fret properly, you don't want to be generating noise as you remove your finger. Practise just playing the note and then relaxing your finger until the note dies, you may have to do this very slowly at first.

Second, use your palm to mute. The same part of your hand that you use to palm mute should touch all the strings below the one you're playing very lightly (when I say below, I mean pitch wise, so if you're playing the A string, your palm touches the low E). You want to make sure you're not pushing down or restricting your hand's motion, just touch enough to make the strings sound dead.
This point of contact moves as you change strings, so if you're playing the A string, you'll be muting the low E and then when you move to the D string, your palm will also move down to mute both the low E and the A strings.

Do this instead. The technique whoomit described usually works, but if the fret in question has a natural harmonic, then when you lift your finger off the harmonic will play instead.
Last edited by toxictaipan at Mar 15, 2011,
#8
Thank you Aleksi for your detailed answer. I think the solution is basically what whoomit wrote. I thought that I have learnt this already and it became a reflex, but guess not. Most of the time I release the frets properly, but there are a couple of stubborn notes where I really have to be careful. Also I find it really hard to mute single notes with my palm. I mostly use my fretting hand to mute unwanted string noise. When I use my palm, all the strings get muted. But I will be practicing it and hopefully master it one day.

Toxictaipan, I actually wrote the wrong notes in my earlier example. What I had problem is the following: A 8th fret to D 6th fret. I fretted the A string with my middle finger when I had this noise problem and then jumped to the 6th fret D string with my index finger. But I figured it out (what a genius ) that I can get a lot clearer sound if I use my ring finger instead. That way I can mute the A string while picking the D.

Thanks for the help guys!
#10
I've seen your video a long time ago mate, but I didn't really pay attention because back then I was still struggling with how to turn on the amp. But now it all makes sense. Muting with your thumb is clever, it's a lot easier than muting single notes with your palm. Wonder why I never thought about it...Thanks! The index finger muting I'm kind of used to by now. I will practice that!