#1
Is Rhythm playing more of a rhythm guitar sound and Treble is playing more of a lead guitar sound?

My Rhythm pickup broke sadly, but my Treble pickup still works, and my guitar seems to sound heavier?
#2
Its just a silly naming thing.
Treble is the bridge pickup, rhythm is the neck pickup. Personally I prefer to use my bridge pickup for rhythm and sometimes leads, and neck for leads and cleans. It just depends what sound you want.
#3
Quote by littlephil
Its just a silly naming thing.
Treble is the bridge pickup, rhythm is the neck pickup. Personally I prefer to use my bridge pickup for rhythm and sometimes leads, and neck for leads and cleans. It just depends what sound you want.


This. I play rhythm on the bridge like 95% of the time, and play lead on whatever pickup I feel like using at the time. There's really no rule to which pup you use for a given part of a song.
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#4
I prefer:
Switch up with volume rolled off to 5~6 = clean
Switch down with volume at 7~8 = lead/distortion
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#5
Quote by xChRoMaTiCx
Is Rhythm playing more of a rhythm guitar sound and Treble is playing more of a lead guitar sound?

My Rhythm pickup broke sadly, but my Treble pickup still works, and my guitar seems to sound heavier?

like others have said, it's just an outdated naming system - both pickups sound different and both can be used for any type of playing, it depends on whether you want a rounded, mellow tone (rhythm position) or a sharp, biting tone (treble position). just use whichever you think sounds better for any given situation.

are you sure your pickup is broken? pickups are pretty tough, and they don't really just break randomly because it's such a simple device that there's really nothing that can go wrong on its own.

it's probably your pickup selector switch, or the volume or tone pots that are connected to the rhythm pickup, that have worn out. it might even be something simple like a bit of dirt in the switch.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#6
Quote by 3volved
I prefer:
Switch up with volume rolled off to 5~6 = clean
Switch down with volume at 7~8 = lead/distortion


I do this, except that my neck pickup is a humbucker-sized P-90 so it sounds even better clean!
#7
you guitar can sound heavier because typically the bridge pickup is hotter, alowing it to push the amp more. generally i use the bridge with maxed volume and my tone about 5ish or slightly under to get a heavier sound out of my setup if i want to use a lot of gain. i mean everyone differs though.
#8
i think the naming is ridiculous, i play rhythm on my bridge pickup exclusively, sounds too muffled on neck PU. in fact, i barely use the neck PU at all.
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#9
I just keep the volume off for the neck pickup and use the selector as a kill switch.
#10
Quote by Mprinsje
i think the naming is ridiculous, i play rhythm on my bridge pickup exclusively, sounds too muffled on neck PU. in fact, i barely use the neck PU at all.

the name originates from an age where people used very transparent clean tones only, so they wanted a warmer, rounder sound that is a bit more subtle for their rhythm tones, and a sharper, more cutting sound that would poke through the mix a bit more for their lead tones. i guess they just never bothered to change it because it's insignificant.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#11
Quote by Blompcube
like others have said, it's just an outdated naming system - both pickups sound different and both can be used for any type of playing, it depends on whether you want a rounded, mellow tone (rhythm position) or a sharp, biting tone (treble position). just use whichever you think sounds better for any given situation.

are you sure your pickup is broken? pickups are pretty tough, and they don't really just break randomly because it's such a simple device that there's really nothing that can go wrong on its own.

it's probably your pickup selector switch, or the volume or tone pots that are connected to the rhythm pickup, that have worn out. it might even be something simple like a bit of dirt in the switch.

Maybe? Rhythm = not working, Rhythm + Treble = not working, Treble = working. It makes no sense so it could be the switch. How could you fix?
#12
look at the inside, there's probably a loose wire somewhere. The neck volume is the master volume when you use both pickups together, so maybe the neck's volume pot is disconnected or something. Just look at the inside through the backplate, it should be easy enough to spot if a wire isn't soldered anymore.