#1
I currently own the crappiest guitar the world has ever known that I purchased from Costco two years ago. It really doesn't suit my playing style (metal) that well. If I were to get a new guitar like an ESP LTD m-1000, do you think that I would actually be able to play better, faster, and with more skill on the m-1000 than on my Fender STARcaster?
#2
Nah it'd make playing easier but you'd actually have to work to get better. If your skilled on your starcaster now it'll maybe make you maybe a little faster with its lower action etc but it wont make that much of a difference
#3
Not really, a guitar doesn't improve your playing, practicing technique is probably what you should do if you want to play faster and better.
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#4
I think it will make you eager to play better having this awesome guitar in your hands. Sorta a mental thing. But it won't make you better. Maybe sound better, but not play better.
#5
^^ I have to disagree with the two of them to a degree.

I have an Ovation acoustic with a Deep V neck and a high action. I play exponentially better on all my other guitars than that one. some things are just impossible to play on that guitar.

to a degree a new guitar won't improve it, but on the same token it can.
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#6
You'll probably play a better instrument more often - that equates to better playing. Get the best you can afford - Squires can be quite good and found cheaply on the used market.
#7
I have to disagree with some of you.

I started out playing on a Fender Lead II, which had pretty small frets and a baseball bat neck. I found after getting my Schecter playing was easier, so I played more, thus getting better.

My 2 cents.
#8
It can help in someways.. When I went from playing my dads cheap piece of crap 12$ ebay acoustic to playing his fender Mex Strat I felt like I could play alot faster because the neck was slimmer and my chords sounded waaay better because the action was lower. But once you get used to your new guitar your still gonna have to keep working on it.
#9
the new guitar can motivate you to get better and quite possibly be easier to play
#10
It's a weird combination of both mental and physical. While it could potentially be more comfortable for you, more than likely it will just give you more of a mental drive. The only reason I recommend that new players wait a year or two before getting a nicer guitar is just in case you decide you're going to abandon it, so that you didn't waste a lot of money.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#11
Depends just how bad the guitar is. A friend of mine had a terrible guitar that would go out of tune after a minute of playing, intonation was off, action so high it was hard to fret notes, etc. If your guitar is like that, definitely get a new one, since you're not even really playing otherwise.
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#12
I think it depends on the action, and the neck.

I feel my technique improved a bit when I lowered my action, and I wanna try out some new guitars to see what kind of neck I like; my Schecter has a pretty fat neck.

But it honestly shouldn't make much of a difference.
#13
Quote by obeythepenguin
A new guitar won't make you better, but it might make it easier for you to become better.


^That makes a lot of sense
#14
well it wont makje you bette but a bad guitar will hold you back...put a really good guitarist on a band guitar (and i mean bad...not starter just really bad) and he wont manage to play as fast
#15
Quote by obeythepenguin
A new guitar won't make you better, but it might make it easier for you to become better.

this.

how easy you find a guitar to play compared to another one is a personal thing - if you have a guitar that suits you better you'll find it easier to play, but it won't make you technically a better player. it can only make you better by inspiring you to practice more
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#17
I'd have to disagree with the majority of opinions denying it. It's isn't exactly a certainty in all cases and maybe not even with everyone, although I am one of them.

I remember how I started off with my sisters Squier Strat. I'd been playing on it for quite a few months and I saw my progress going fairly, but once I managed to buy a better guitar and once which I could have the chance to choose, I went for an SG, and my progress rocketed in comparison with before.

The thing is that the neck seemed smoother, and the fretboard a lot easier to slide around and play the strings. Although the biggest diference I noticed was the gap between each string. On the SG they are more tucked near each other then on my Strat, and I'd once in a while have a few problems are hitting the string on the Strat (I'd sometimes miss it).
Believe me or not, but as soon as I got my SG, I completly bonded with it, and the string malarky going on, went down about 75%, which was a huge diference, and then I got better. And a lot faster.

Obviously now, I've gone a long way and the more you know and you get used to the instrument, you seem to be able to play on any guitar, let it be a SG, Strat, or a kid-sized acoustic guitar. Although that being said, I still can't manage to play quite as well on the Strat then on my SG.
#18
This is something Im pretty interested in aswell, as Im in the same boat as OP. Ive owned a POS guitar for 2 years (Its a Supreme ST-1 strat, danish brand, about as good as a Squier Affinity strat) and untill now I havent played it seriously, maybe half an hour a week, just trying to play a few songs that I liked. But now ive started to follow the beginners course on JustinGuitar.com and Ive passed the first third of the beginner classes in two days fairly easy. Im also wondering if I should try to get money for a new Guitar in the 500-700$ range, or wait 8 months and get "really" good first and then buy a 1000-1500$ guitar. Its not that I find it hard to play my current guitar, but I really want a new one, but at the same time, I dont wanna waste money now or maybe go out and buy a new one without knowing what I should look for.
#19
I agree with the folks who said it's both mental and physical.

If the guitar is higher quality it is likely much more comfortable to play making it feel "easier" to do things that might have seemed challenging. This doesn't really make you better persay. For instance a BMW 7 series is a higher quality vehicle then a standard Ford Focus. Does driving one make you a better driver. No. However the car will respond more tightly to your movements. If that makes sense.

Also if you like your guitar better you will play more thusly learning more so it's a double edged sword.

If you can afford it and it is your passion a better quality instrument can only help you pursue that easier. Just my 2 cents.
#21
Quote by progrmr
You'll probably play a better instrument more often - that equates to better playing. Get the best you can afford - Squires can be quite good and found cheaply on the used market.



Ya you'll want to play it more so by doing so you will (hopefully) improve.
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#22
you will improve with a better guitar in terms of playing style. m sure that the costco guitar is some sort of squire and it probably plays like shit. and adjusting those kinda guitars can be hard to do. i think you should definatly upgrade given you have a decent amp. you dont wan to spend a ton on a guitar and skimp out on an amp. amp>guitar
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#23
if the bad guitar is physically limiting - ie - it gets dead notes or has bad parts, goes out of tune etc. its going to sound bad and be harder to play. so yeah it will HELP you sound better. but your fingers must still do teh work.
#24
Well I'll agree with the people saying that it provides inspiration.

When I had my own shitty costco guitar i barely touched it. I upgraded to an Epi SG which was great for a while before i started to hate the shit outta it because of it's thick neck and neck dive issues.

Then I actually did proper research and got my Edwards, and with the comfort of the nice neck I can say that my playing did get better because i actually enjoyed picking up the guitar and practicing. Versus picking up the cheap one and putting it down 20 minutes later because of comfort issues.
#25
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I feel like the general consensus from this thread is that the new guitar makes you feel better about what you are playing therefore increasing the frequency of playing or practicing. Then that leads to getting better as a result of newfound intrest.
#26
A new guitar doesn't make you play better, although it can be a good motivation for you to play hence perfecting you technique.
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#27
Quote by hconn
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I feel like the general consensus from this thread is that the new guitar makes you feel better about what you are playing therefore increasing the frequency of playing or practicing. Then that leads to getting better as a result of newfound intrest.


Okay sport, here's the deal.


A new guitar is a new guitar. You get one if it feels nice and sounds good to you. If you get one with the idea that, "Hmmm my guitar sucks I need a new guitar that'll make me play better. I'm being held back. It's soooo hard to bend the strings etc the action must be messed up..." I can guarantee that you won't improve in the slightest.


You still know the same things, you'll still play the same way. It's not the 'Pick of Destiny'. It's a hunk of wood with 2 magnets. If you can't make your current hunk of wood sound good, then you won't make your new guitar sound any better.


You can still get a new guitar man but DON'T get that idea ^ stuck in your head or you'll set yourself up for disappointment.
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#28
You're only as good as your instrument will allow you to be. A lot of people can churn out excellent things with sub-par instruments, be it a musical instrument, drawing tablet, canvas...

When you get a higher-quality guitar, you'll feel the difference and most likely play better. Technically you don't become more skilled, but it will let your true skill level to show through without having to fight the guitar. When I got my prestige Ibanez, the difference in quality totally blew me away, it was simply easier to play, and if you can play something with less effort, whether because you have a new instrument or you fixed your technique, there are going to be fewer mistakes and you'll hear the difference.
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#29
Quote by Dayn
You're only as good as your instrument will allow you to be. A lot of people can churn out excellent things with sub-par instruments, be it a musical instrument, drawing tablet, canvas...

When you get a higher-quality guitar, you'll feel the difference and most likely play better. Technically you don't become more skilled, but it will let your true skill level to show through without having to fight the guitar. When I got my prestige Ibanez, the difference in quality totally blew me away, it was simply easier to play, and if you can play something with less effort, whether because you have a new instrument or you fixed your technique, there are going to be fewer mistakes and you'll hear the difference.

Might I introduce you to Seasick Steve: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=keMbjwBzWYw
Whose plays on (among other broke-ass instruments) an old, crappy Teisco EP-7 with a mis-matched neck and a Harmony pickup duct-taped to it, but still kicks ass as one of the better blues musicians performing today.

I believe that you just have to find the instrument that works best for you and master it. Develop your own style.
Sincerely, Chad.
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#30
Quote by Dayn
You're only as good as your instrument will allow you to be. A lot of people can churn out excellent things with sub-par instruments, be it a musical instrument, drawing tablet, canvas...

When you get a higher-quality guitar, you'll feel the difference and most likely play better. Technically you don't become more skilled, but it will let your true skill level to show through without having to fight the guitar. When I got my prestige Ibanez, the difference in quality totally blew me away, it was simply easier to play, and if you can play something with less effort, whether because you have a new instrument or you fixed your technique, there are going to be fewer mistakes and you'll hear the difference.



I went from a Gibson Les Paul Supreme to an import Jackson. I'm sure the quality of the Gibson is much better than the Jackson so why don't I have it anymore?

It didn't make me play any more amazing and it costs the same price as a used car. That's why.

Once you get FAMILIAR with the guitar, you don't fight with it anymore, you adapt to it.
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
#31
New better guitar = more incentive to play = playing more = getting more practice = getting better at playing.
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#32
Quote by PsiGuy60
New better guitar = more incentive to play = playing more = getting more practice = getting better at playing.


What if you buy the guitar thinking it would inspire you only for you to realize it won't?


New better guitar = more incentive to play until you realize you're no better than before = playing less cause you turned yourself off guitar and are a little depressed over the matter = selling guitar for bar money = getting a real job when you realize not everybody can be a rockstar.


EDIT: u guise r maaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaad oh wow
Quote by zgr0826
My culture is worthless and absolutely inferior to the almighty Leaf.


Quote by JustRooster
I incurred the wrath of the Association of White Knights. Specifically the Parent's Basement branch of service.
Last edited by H4T3BR33D3R at Mar 18, 2011,
#33
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I went from a Gibson Les Paul Supreme to an import Jackson. I'm sure the quality of the Gibson is much better than the Jackson so why don't I have it anymore?

It didn't make me play any more amazing and it costs the same price as a used car. That's why.

Once you get FAMILIAR with the guitar, you don't fight with it anymore, you adapt to it.


Maybe the feel of the two guitars which are complete opposites in terms of feel had something to do with it? I mean if you prefer smaller necks (which you obviously do) why would you keep a guitar like a Gibson?

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R

New better guitar = more incentive to play until you realize you're no better than before = playing less cause you turned yourself off guitar and are a little depressed over the matter = selling guitar for bar money = getting a real job when you realize not everybody can be a rockstar.


So basically, what your saying is, if you can't play well enough to become a famous rockstar just give up at playing in general because you'll always be shit?

Stop trolling. (That Sheen avatar doesn't help either) If thats how you feel then why are YOU even bothering to learn?

Guitar playing is a hobby to quite a lot of people here. It's like asking why do people read books or play video games? For ENJOYMENT.

If you get a new guitar which inspires you to practice more often but you don't see yourself improving that simply means you're not practicing enough.

I can say that my playing has definitely improved ever since upgrading from my Epi to my Edwards a year ago. If you have a guitar that causes discomfort to you, or just generally feels like a poor guitar, then how are you going to find enjoyment in practicing?
#34
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I went from a Gibson Les Paul Supreme to an import Jackson. I'm sure the quality of the Gibson is much better than the Jackson so why don't I have it anymore?

It didn't make me play any more amazing and it costs the same price as a used car. That's why.

Once you get FAMILIAR with the guitar, you don't fight with it anymore, you adapt to it.


perhaps you realized that your LP was a chinese fake and the jackson was all you could afford. only a moron would dump a high end LP and get an import Jackson to replace it. i'm sure you could have gotten a Japanese made one and still had money left over. why in the world would you buy that LP and then decide you didn't want it?
#35
You don't get better with a newer guitar. I reckon it's the other way around: You may sound worse on a crappy guitar. Essentially you're not doing anything on your brand new guitar that you couldn't already do, just the crap gear was stopping you from doing so.
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#36
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
What if you buy the guitar thinking it would inspire you only for you to realize it won't?


New better guitar = more incentive to play until you realize you're no better than before = playing less cause you turned yourself off guitar and are a little depressed over the matter = selling guitar for bar money = getting a real job when you realize not everybody can be a rockstar.

Guess your name is right, there.
Suspect troll.

Many people don't buy a new guitar specifically for inspiration anyway (would you buy a new computer/typewriter/pen because you had writer's block? I sure as f*ck wouldn't).

From personal experience, upgrading from a cheap starterpack Strat to a no-name Superstrat (and later to an Ibanez S670) gave me an incentive to play more - it felt nicer. Thus, by playing it more, I slowly improved. Key word being slowly.

Of course you don't see immediate results. Only the ones who really shouldn't be playing in the first place get turned off by that after buying a new guitar.
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Last edited by PsiGuy60 at Mar 18, 2011,
#37
Okay here is my pont of view.
Your guitar is a teaching tool. If your teaching tools are crap then it will affect your learning whether it's guitar playing, a language, or something else.
A good teaching tool can both be a 150$ guitar and a 1500$ guitar.
My first guitar was a crappy piece of plywood and shortly after I got myself a good cheap Squier, which helped me a lot.
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#38
Long story short: A bad guitar might slow you down, while a well built one might allow you to play at your full potential.

So it won't really increase your skills, but it might allow you to play at your best more easily.
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