#1
Well, long story short, my girlfriend got her first guitar yesterday (A Washburn Nuno Bettencourt Sig N 4SA...at a pawnshop for 325$. Pawn Shops are such idiots )

Anywho, she wants me to teach her, and I don't even know where to start. Like, I explained to her how to play the A major scale... and one of the minor pentatonics, and she can play them. However..I'm at a loss at where to actually START.




EDIT: 3rd guitar down
http://www.washburn.com/electrics/nuno/


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
#2
Open chords - Chord progressions - simple scales over you playing chords.
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#3
Don't teach theory is a golden rule
How much theory did you need when you first started out? None.

Tell her a few chords and ho to play simple songs like:

Wild thing
That james blunt song
Other songs with open chords

Then power chords
Then more songs

Teach theory when she can play a few songs all the way through.
#6
You started with scales? I'd start with open chords and a chromatic exercise.
#7
Alright so the consensus here is don't start with theory... I figured that it'd be better for her to start with it cause I didn't start to learn it until 2 years in, and my playing still suffers because of it.

So.. In general:
- Open Chords
- Some simple chord progressions
- Simple Songs

-Then later on start with theory?

Any suggestions to some easy chords/progressions? I only know complicated ones now...damn progressive xD


Quote by Saint78
Jackal is like 90.

Quote by Jackal58
Buy stock in Viagra. Imma gonna fuck you in the ass.
Last edited by Scowmoo at Mar 16, 2011,
#8
Explain the relations between chords when you're teaching progressions, but don't make it a priority (ie: which chords are in the key of C so it's easier for her to make up progressions). I personally think that at least knowing what the theory is gives a better understanding of the long run because it gives a better foundation, but to hammer it in early on would likely be too much too soon.
Quote by Joshua Garcia
my chemical romance are a bunch of homos making love to a mic and you like that cuz your a huge gay wad. You should feel pathetic for being such a gaywad you gay mcr loving gaywad olllol.
#9
Make sure she has good technique and just teach her songs she wants to play, theory can come later if she gets into it.
#10
Agree with theory coming later.

My order would be:

1. How to hold the guitar/posture
2. Open Chords
3. Basic Strumming Patterns
4. Find a song or two she likes using simple open chords, and strumming pattern
5. combine the chords and strumming pattern to learn the song

The first song I was taught was Last Kiss by Pearl Jam. it was a simple song that combined easy chords, with a fairly easy strumming pattern. I was so excited after I could play it.

The key is to feel like you're making progress.
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#11
Find a song you both like.
Download Guitar Pro Tab.
Play song at 25% speed or slower until she can play it at 100%.
Screw doing scale exercises, hahaha.
#12
Make sure she enjoys her playing first of all. After she's comfortable with her guitar (knows the basics) then introduce theory into what your teaching her. Just try not to get to tecnical because it scares alot of people off playing.
#13
Quote by Scowmoo
(A Washburn Nuno Bettencourt Sig N 4SA...at a pawnshop for 325$. Pawn Shops are such idiots )


Jeff Beck signature Strat' for £300. I got an instant erection, unfortunately was too skint at the time to buy it.

Quote by farmosh203
Screw doing scale exercises, hahaha.


Couldn't disagree more, I didn't bother with scales for quite a while, and only know Minor/Major/Pentatonic and Phyrgian, and they're good bases for improvising.

Show her harmonics, and get her to practise scales, vibrato techniques and chords.
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Last edited by Joelthefrog1 at Mar 19, 2011,
#14
Teach her some difficult scales to demotivate her. That way she'll give you her guitar when she quits!

Each to there own. When I started out, I found it motivating to learn parts of songs I thought were awesome.
#15
Do you use Guitar Pro at all? if not, you should check it out, there's quite alot that can be accomplished with that.

Anyway, if you should go the Guitar Pro route, (perferably G Pro 6) not too long ago, I got a video of Marty Friedman (former Megadeth) called melodic control. A guitar pro tab of one of the songs is available to download for G Pro here at UG. The song is damn easy....acoustic chords going from E to D then to A, from there, "YOU" get to play background melody leads behind it. The leads aren't anything over the top, I think you'd find it rather rewarding to check out to teach a beginner.

Hope this helps
#16
Open chords. Preferably learned around a song she enjoys.

Simple melodies/riffs.

Do not teach theory, for God sake.

Also, one thing at a time. Focus on getting her to finger a chord correctly and relatively comfortably before a focus on strumming technique, for example.
#17
i suggest teaching finger strength

start with exercises eg.1-2, 2-1, 2-3 etc... 1234, 4321, 2341 etc...

really helps
#18
Quote by '93
i suggest teaching finger strength

start with exercises eg.1-2, 2-1, 2-3 etc... 1234, 4321, 2341 etc...

really helps


Are you high?
#19
Quote by elloel
Are you high?


Are you? Exercises are key in the beginning. Never overload your student in the beginning by giving them theory, they need to understand how to play physically before they start playing mentally. Guitar is a surprisingly physical instrument, and exercising on the fretboard is 100% necessary. 1-2-3-4 exercises are boring as hell, yes, but it's a very effective first lesson.

Make sure your first couple lessons have an attainable goal, like playing the exercises without pausing between notes and playing scales using the proper positioning. You don't want to throw them directly into chords; chords are too physical for somebody who hasn't been using their fingers and hands like a guitarist has to. Starting with chords is an easy way to develop bad technique that is compensating for lack of preparedness. I've seen it happen too many times to feel comfortable with this method of teaching.

Remember, in the beginning technique is key! And the best way to develop proper technique is to foster its growth using common-sense lessons, such as exercises and scales.

Hope this helps!

- Justin
An open mind never knows too much.
#20
Sure. Technique is key. But doing finger strengthening exercises as the first thing you learn when picking up a guitar isn't exactly motivating. So many guitar newbies quit because of this.

You gotta ask the person WHAT she wants.
Motivation. Motivation. Motivation.
#21
Quote by elloel
Sure. Technique is key. But doing finger strengthening exercises as the first thing you learn when picking up a guitar isn't exactly motivating. So many guitar newbies quit because of this.

You gotta ask the person WHAT she wants.
Motivation. Motivation. Motivation.


I agree with you, exercises are very boring and tedious. If the person being taught doesn't care about being fluent and correct but just wants to "learn how to play easily", then sure, show 'em some easy songs and stuff so that they can have some fun and mess around. If the person being taught is SERIOUS about learning how to play correctly, then they should be motivated to do whatever you (the teacher, the professional) tells them to do. Motivating your student also has a lot to do with presentation; you don't just drone through the explanation and expect them to be super-stoked to repeat easy patterns for a week straight... Coherent and structured explanations (Coupled with genuine enthusiasm) will go farther to motivate your student than any song could.

- Justin
An open mind never knows too much.
#22
im going to start teaching a mate soon and my input is this

1. teach easy songs that they like or know, open chords will get boring fast. much easier for them to get into it if they can play along to something or have a song to aim for

2. teach them the first position of the pentatonic minor scale just so they get used to using theyre little finger. use it as an exercise but dont kick the arse out of it cause it will get boring and they'll lose interest

3. make sure they understand that they have to WANT to learn. ive had several mates who have started and given up cause they didnt have the drive to want to learn/practice.

4. teach them in what ever tuning they want to play in eg if her favourite band is three days grace teach her three days grace stuff in drop D/C ect... dont make them play in standard tuning just because its standard tuning.
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#23
Everyone else seems to have you covered, but I just had to say, you got one hell of a deal. I'm going to have to start looking through pawn shops.

More on topic everyone seems to be giving good advice, just motivation is key, but definatley the technique, little of both I'd say, don't over load her with one thing kind of little here little there, then you can find what she really wants to learn and move that way and cover the rest later on or as you go. The key really is having her want to play, but then again if she quits you'll just have a new guitar...
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#24
People new to guitar want to learn to play music, not just individual notes and chords. I'd sit down with her and teach her G, C & D (if she is a quick study, maybe toss in an Em) and have her practice strumming and changing between the chords. In essence, you've just laid the foundation for her to play about 1,397 songs. Download some tunes (if you don't already have them), and play along with them. Print the lyrics to the songs, sit together while playing and sing your own covers. Laugh off the mistakes, they will be plentiful, speak as simply as possible, and be overly patient and encouraging.

Most importantly, have fun with it. When it's not fun...it becomes more like work, and who wants to do that in their free time?
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#25
I think the best is to ask her what music sh love
find some songs that she likes
make it as fun as it could be
and with very tiny proportion teach her theory.
I even recommed to give her some basic exercises that she needs to practise them every day.
after that every week teach her 3-4 new chords of course start with the open ones.
after a month when she feel more comfortable teach her a barre chords
to put her fingers in shape.
after all this hopefully she will develop some hunger and she wll start practesing bu her self
good luck
andrew