#1
Hey guys, I was just watching Steve Vai and he mentioned something about using circular vibrato, is it as easy as moving your finger in a circle shape for vibrato? Or is it much more complicated? Thanks in advance!
#2
its that easy!
but you know still keep it in tune and in time etc. i tried it at frist it feels awkward but once you get used to it at least you have another sound use
#3
yea he's actually wrong about this, sort of...


he explained it as vibrating like a violinist would(moving up and down the neck, thus lengthening/shortening the string and changing the pitch)


because its a fretted instrument this doesnt work on guitar(unless its a fretless )


it does sound slightly(and i mean slightly) different when you vibrate in a circle but not much
#4
actually moving the string back and forth like a violin does make a vibrato but its very slight
#5
Quote by supersac
actually moving the string back and forth like a violin does make a vibrato but its very slight



no. it cant possibly change the pitch.


the string is vibrating from the fret wire(on the other side of the fret that your finger is on) to the bridge


moving your finger up and down the neck cannot change the length of the string

what your hearing is probably your finger bending the string slightly
#6
Quote by rickyj
no. it cant possibly change the pitch.
the string is vibrating from the fret wire(on the other side of the fret that your finger is on) to the bridge

moving your finger up and down the neck cannot change the length of the string

what your hearing is probably your finger bending the string slightly

you can tighten or slack the string from the fret point (with your finger), changing it's pitch
#7
When Steve Vai's talking about translating violin back-and-forth vibrato to guitar he means doing it like guys like George Lynch and Warren DiMartini and all those shredder guys did it back in the 80s where you side your finger across the span of one, two or three frets/notes within your target note. So if your not was the g on the twelfth fret g string, you'd slide from the tenth to the fourteenth back to the tenth and back again really fast so it sounds like REALLY wide vibrato.
#8
When you go back and forth it actually tightens and loosens the string. It gives a subtle but full vibrato because the string actually goes a bit flat when to move towards you (like a whammy bar would) as opposed to just going sharp and back to pitch. Yeah, practice slowly, it's an amazing technique when you get it down.
Last edited by Tempoe at Mar 16, 2011,
#9
Quote by rickyj
yea he's actually wrong about this, sort of...


he explained it as vibrating like a violinist would(moving up and down the neck, thus lengthening/shortening the string and changing the pitch)


because its a fretted instrument this doesnt work on guitar(unless its a fretless )


it does sound slightly(and i mean slightly) different when you vibrate in a circle but not much


It does work, because you still shorten and lengthen the string, the frets don't matter in this case.

Quote by rickyj
no. it cant possibly change the pitch.



the string is vibrating from the fret wire(on the other side of the fret that your finger is on) to the bridge



moving your finger up and down the neck cannot change the length of the string

what your hearing is probably your finger bending the string slightly


That still doesn't matter, because no matter which focal point you use to change the length, the length everywhere changes. It doesn't just change in between two frets. Please know what you're talking about before correcting others.
Last edited by Meelad360 at Mar 16, 2011,
#10
Quote by hemmen7
Hey guys, I was just watching Steve Vai and he mentioned something about using circular vibrato, is it as easy as moving your finger in a circle shape for vibrato? Or is it much more complicated? Thanks in advance!


No, it's pretty much that simple, here's a lesson from the man himself about it: http://www.vai.com/LittleBlackDots/84/vibrato.html

Quote by Meelad360
It does work, because you still shorten and lengthen the string, the frets don't matter in this case.


The length of the string stays the same when you do the classical style vibrato, what actually changes is the tension on the string.

Quote by Meelad360
Please know what you're talking about before correcting others.


If you're going to spout off about the mechanics of anything I suggest you do the same.
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Last edited by Zaphod_Beeblebr at Mar 16, 2011,
#11
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
No, it's pretty much that simple, here's a lesson from the man himself about it: http://www.vai.com/LittleBlackDots/84/vibrato.html



The length of the string stays the same when you do the classical style vibrato, what actually changes is the tension on the string.



If you're going to spout off about the mechanics of anything I suggest you do the same.


Same shit.
#12
Quote by Meelad360
Same shit.


If you're going to correct someone else on matters of mechanics then no, it isn't the same at all.

Quote by toxictaipan
You're arguing semantics. Stop it.


I'm not arguing, everyone else is arguing. I'm just plain right.
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“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#13
Quote by hemmen7
Hey guys, I was just watching Steve Vai and he mentioned something about using circular vibrato, is it as easy as moving your finger in a circle shape for vibrato? Or is it much more complicated? Thanks in advance!


Hmm send me the link of the video if you have!!
ACE AND THE ASS
#17
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
If you're going to correct someone else on matters of mechanics then no, it isn't the same at all.


I'm not arguing, everyone else is arguing. I'm just plain right.


Look. The tension of the string directly correlates between how much string there is in the length between your fingers and the bridge. I knew it was tension, I typed it wrong. Got it?
#18
Quote by Meelad360
Look. The tension of the string directly correlates between how much string there is in the length between your fingers and the bridge. I knew it was tension, I typed it wrong. Got it?


No it doesn't, - when you tune a guitar the distance between the nut and the bridge doesn't change, does it?
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#19
tension is the tightness of the string. (Strings do stretch)
tighter = more tension = higher pitch.

TS - vai's circular vibrato is a combination of classical and blues vibrato.
And yes simply put it's a circular motion.
However, you don't just move finger in a circle... you have to apply both types of vibrato simultaneously - or it won't sound very good.

So there is some degree of complication if you are not skilled at using either type of vibrato already... if you are already skilled at both - it just takes a little practice to get the feel of circular.
hope that helps.
#20
Quote by steven seagull
No it doesn't, - when you tune a guitar the distance between the nut and the bridge doesn't change, does it?


No, but the amount of string does, like I said. In that case the nut works as if it were your finger.
#21
Quote by Meelad360
No, but the amount of string does, like I said. In that case the nut works as if it were your finger.

Then that's mass changing, not length which is what you said - and that's not relevant either. What happens is that, either with side to side vibrato or tuning, is that the force being applied to the string changes. It's got sod all to do with the physical properties of the string itself, any changes to those are a symptom of the change in force, not the cause.

As far as a vibrating string goes, the only bit that matters is the bit between the anchor points, ie the bridge and the nut or fret - the rest of the string doesn't come into the equation, and your finger doesn't either on a fretted instrument. Your finger's only there to apply enough pressure to keep the string against the fret, where your finger is doesn't matter in that respect. Your finger only acts as the anchor point if you're playing a fretless instrument
Actually called Mark!

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...it's a seagull

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#22
Quote by steven seagull
Then that's mass changing, not length which is what you said - and that's not relevant either. What happens is that, either with side to side vibrato or tuning, is that the force being applied to the string changes. It's got sod all to do with the physical properties of the string itself, any changes to those are a symptom of the change in force, not the cause.

As far as a vibrating string goes, the only bit that matters is the bit between the anchor points, ie the bridge and the nut or fret - the rest of the string doesn't come into the equation, and your finger doesn't either on a fretted instrument. Your finger's only there to apply enough pressure to keep the string against the fret, where your finger is doesn't matter in that respect. Your finger only acts as the anchor point if you're playing a fretless instrument


K

I meant tension, said length, tried to recover, didn't workout so well