#1
Dear all,

I am beginner with an acoustic guitar. i have one thing get cleared about my playing. Please somebody help me.


Question is ,

How can i play any song with C major key (CFG). What i am not clear is, when to change C to F , F to G .


Lets say i start playing song with C major , what is the next code i should change.
Please some body explain me this ,

Thank you so much.
Thushanga.
#2
Honestly, I have no idea what you're asking.

You can do it however you want. There's no "have to"s in music.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#3
i presume you mean when do you change chord, you can change any time. try changing after four beasts of each.
#4
Thank you all,

I will explain further what I want to know, this might help you.

I haven’t learned any music theories; I just learn some chords and now trying play my guitar. I can play songs if I have the cords by looking at it.

I am Software guy, now I am going a trip with my office friends. So If I had to play a song which I don’t know chords, what should I do .As I know anything can be played with C major key (CFG),

I tried that at home, but I confuse when to change chords, basically I start with C chord, then I really don’t understand what is code I should change next, is it depends on voice or anything..

Is there any order to change chords such as C to F then F to G or something, when I sing high what is the appropriate chord?

Please help me, if I am wrong please correct me I don’t have much idea about music theories. Is there anything I should learn, I just want to be ok with any song with my guitar.

Thank you so much .
Emil
#5
Quote by thushanga

I am Software guy


Hello, Software guy.

now I am going a trip with my office friends. So If I had to play a song which I don’t know chords, what should I dol


Phrygian Mode.
#6
Quote by Calibos
Hello, Software guy.


Phrygian Mode.


Stop acting like a jerk, please.

Thushanga, the best thing you can do is find a rhythm you like, and play the chords over that. Then try to sing notes that are in the chord itself that you're playing.
#8
Quote by thushanga
Thank you all,

I will explain further what I want to know, this might help you.

I haven’t learned any music theories; I just learn some chords and now trying play my guitar. I can play songs if I have the cords by looking at it.

I am Software guy, now I am going a trip with my office friends. So If I had to play a song which I don’t know chords, what should I do .As I know anything can be played with C major key (CFG),

I tried that at home, but I confuse when to change chords, basically I start with C chord, then I really don’t understand what is code I should change next, is it depends on voice or anything..

Is there any order to change chords such as C to F then F to G or something, when I sing high what is the appropriate chord?

Please help me, if I am wrong please correct me I don’t have much idea about music theories. Is there anything I should learn, I just want to be ok with any song with my guitar.

Thank you so much .
Emil

You can't play "any song" with the chords C F and G, only songs that use the chords C F and G. I'm not sure if I'm perhaps misunderstanding you but if that's what you've been led to believe then no, it's wrong.

Chords are like the words of a story, if you use different words then you're not telling the same story any more. It's the same with chords, if you don't use the ones that were in the song originally then it won't be the same song. If you don't know them and can't work them out then you're out of luck, there's no magic "universal formula" that will enable you to play any song.

You change chords when the chord changes in the original song, and the chord you play is the same as in the song
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#9
Quote by Calibos
Successful troll is successful.


Ha! You don't seem to understand the difference between a troll and a jerk. Now go away.

On topic, most popular songs have a variation of the I-IV-V chords, which are the C-F-G chords in C major. So you could transpose those songs to C major, and play them using just the C-F-G chords. I think that is what you are referring to, right?
Last edited by Keth at Mar 18, 2011,
#10
Quote by Keth
Ha! You don't seem to understand the difference between a troll and a jerk. Now go away.


facepalm.jpg

I'm not the troll ITT.

Let's leave it there.
Last edited by Calibos at Mar 18, 2011,
#11
Quote by Calibos
facepalm.jpg

I'm not the troll ITT.

Let's leave it there.

I don't see any trolls, just one person acting like a tosser.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#12
Quote by steven seagull
I don't see any trolls


Post 1. Page 1.

just one person acting like a tosser.


Charming.
#13
^ I don't think the TS is a troll, just a beginning guitarist. I had similar misunderstandings of music back when I started playing as well. That said, you're being as useless right now as the average troll anyways.

Emil: not all songs follow the same chord progressions, despite having chords in common. The key of C is a particularly guitar friendly key, and any song whose chords are I, IV, and V (in the key of C, these are C, F and G) can be played in C as well (which is called transposition). You would just have to sing the melody in a different key to match, as well.

There's no rules about when to switch chords or what melodies go over which chords; it's entirely dependent on the song itself.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#14
Quote by Keth
Ha! You don't seem to understand the difference between a troll and a jerk. Now go away.

On topic, most popular songs have a variation of the I-IV-V chords, which are the C-F-G chords in C major. So you could transpose those songs to C major, and play them using just the C-F-G chords. I think that is what you are referring to, right?



Yes thats it , So when play in C major how to to identify chord change , when to change next code , may be it based on the voice whether it s going high or low , in c major key what is the highest cord and the lowest one ?

Thank you so much helping me.
#15
Quote by Instrumetal
^ I don't think the TS is a troll, just a beginning guitarist. I had similar misunderstandings of music back when I started playing as well. That said, you're being as useless right now as the average troll anyways.

Emil: not all songs follow the same chord progressions, despite having chords in common. The key of C is a particularly guitar friendly key, and any song whose chords are I, IV, and V (in the key of C, these are C, F and G) can be played in C as well (which is called transposition). You would just have to sing the melody in a different key to match, as well.

There's no rules about when to switch chords or what melodies go over which chords; it's entirely dependent on the song itself.


Thank you so much helping me.if i am wrong please correct me.

i read some articles, they said , for C major key you have following chords order,

C-Dm-Em-F-G-Am-Bdim

So these are valid chord for a song which is running on C family. Ok then based on what factor these 7 chords should change , is it voice or the time , if i am playing SUMMER OF 69 , based on what understanding i should apply this chords.
#16
You're correct in that those chords are all "diatonic" (meaning found naturally in the key) to C. Any of those chords will work in a song in C if used correctly, but there really aren't rules. You could play Summer of 69, You Can Call Me Al, Dust in the Wind, and countless other songs with those same chords, but where you change from chord to chord is completely dependent on the individual song. If you're going to go camping, your best bet is to get some chord charts to bring with you, because unfortunately there's no universal method for chord changes. With time you'll be able to memorize songs easier and gain an ear for harmonic motion and be able to figure out chords more easily and maybe not be so reliant on chord charts, but that only comes with time and practice. There's no shortcuts.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#17
Quote by Instrumetal
You're correct in that those chords are all "diatonic" (meaning found naturally in the key) to C. Any of those chords will work in a song in C if used correctly, but there really aren't rules. You could play Summer of 69, You Can Call Me Al, Dust in the Wind, and countless other songs with those same chords, but where you change from chord to chord is completely dependent on the individual song. If you're going to go camping, your best bet is to get some chord charts to bring with you, because unfortunately there's no universal method for chord changes. With time you'll be able to memorize songs easier and gain an ear for harmonic motion and be able to figure out chords more easily and maybe not be so reliant on chord charts, but that only comes with time and practice. There's no shortcuts.



Thank you so much helping me to get cleared this, now i know for what i should practice more and more , you gave me the moral. thank you guys out there to help us..

Thank you for your time.
Emil
Bye
#18
When you are trying to learn chords, try learning them in the context of ONE song. Pick a simple song, and learn that soing. LISTEN for the changes with your ears.

Look at sheet music with lyrics, and see where it shows the chords changing. You wont learn where to change chords until you learn to hear and percieve "changes" in the music you play.

I cannot overstate the point about learning proper songs first....find a beginner song and get the information for that song, especially one that shows lyrics and chords...and listen for those changes by listening to the original version of the song.

Follow the song by reading along as it plays and see if you can HEAR when the chords change. This can be difficult at first, so I am telling you the best way to do this, if you have no one there to help you.

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 19, 2011,
#19
Quote by Sean0913
When you are trying to learn chords, try learning them in the context of ONE song. Pick a simple song, and learn that soing. LISTEN for the changes with your ears.

Look at sheet music with lyrics, and see where it shows the chords changing. You wont learn where to change chords until you learn to hear and percieve "changes" in the music you play.

I cannot overstate the point about learning proper songs first....find a beginner song and get the information for that song, especially one that shows lyrics and chords...and listen for those changes by listening to the original version of the song.

Follow the song by reading along as it plays and see if you can HEAR when the chords change. This can be difficult at first, so I am telling you the best way to do this, if you have no one there to help you.

Sean


This is great. you showed me the clear way to start. thank you so much .if possible please suggest me a song ,i will find it .

thank you emil
#21
Quote by metalmetalhead
If your just practicing C F G code just guess with the timing. after you can do that good try some more advanced codes like G C F or F C G.



Let ask you one more thing ,

What is the difference C to F and then F to G . what makes CFG in that order.

what is have F than C and what is have G than F.

if possible please give me idea for this.
Thank you in advance.
Emil
#22
I don't know what you mean by "codes", presumably "chord progressions", but code isn't really a legitimate musical term so you'd be best referring to them as progressions.

CFG is just one progressions, in this case I - IV - V, because C F and G are the first, fourth, and fifth chords in the key of C.

I don't know what metalhead is on about "more advanced", because there's nothing more difficult about playing FCG, musically, harmonically, or physiologically.
Get baked, study theory.

Quote by :-D
Why are you bringing Cm into this?
#24
Quote by Calibos
Post 1. Page 1.


Charming.

Um not everyone on this forum is a musical genius, plus when it comes to music theory it is very easy to become confused, which is obviously what has happened to TS.
#25
Quote by thushanga
Let ask you one more thing ,

What is the difference C to F and then F to G . what makes CFG in that order.

what is have F than C and what is have G than F.

if possible please give me idea for this.
Thank you in advance.
Emil


In the key of C:

C = I = Tonic Chord
F = IV = Subdominant Chord
G = V = Dominant Chord

To figure out when to change between these, you really just need to listen to the song and hear the changes for yourself. Although, it could be helpful for you to understand the ideas of Chord Progressions and Cadences.
#26
Quote by pcorey
In the key of C:

C = I = Tonic Chord
F = IV = Subdominant Chord
G = V = Dominant Chord

To figure out when to change between these, you really just need to listen to the song and hear the changes for yourself. Although, it could be helpful for you to understand the ideas of Chord Progressions and Cadences.



Thank you so much for the explanation and the links , this is what i looked for ,

Great thanks.
Emil
#27
Thank you everybody who helped me here ,i learned lot of things thanks to you guys.