#1
This is me playing Iron Maiden's Phantom of the opera.

Phantom of the opera (youtube)

WHAT do I need to work on? I cannot afford private guitar lessons either online or with a person. Should I purchase Jamie Andreas Principles of correct practice?
Or can someone please recommend some online articles ect.
I so want to become a better guitar playing and I am willing to give it time!

Please someone help me, I want to enjoy and rock the guitar!
#2
1. Smoking....tut tut....
2. Make your hand movements as small as possible (ie. the pull-offs)
3. Those crazy full arm strums....while sitting down...
#3
So in other words, loose the cigarettes
And relax more while playing? Maybe I should get a copy of Jamie Andrea's Principle of correct practice.
#4
Quote by Hckey#
So in other words, loose the cigarettes
And relax more while playing? Maybe I should get a copy of Jamie Andrea's Principle of correct practice.


Yeah , now I've never heard of ''Jamie....'' so I've no idea about that!
#5
Yeah, loosen up a bit, and work on your strumming. Your fretting hand looks alright, but the strumming hand could use some work.

Also, trim your damn strings. I can't see why anyone wants so much excess string hanging off their headstock, just waiting to snag on something.
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Don't argue with my new deity.
#6
Sorry to rebirth this thread.
But what is the best, most effective and most of all CORRECT way to practice a song.

I am trying to learn Phantom of the opera by Iron Maiden, I want to nail this song but also sound good doing it.
#7
I've read the Andreas book a couple years back, it was good, got me to relax alot more. I didn't do all of the exercises much though, 'cause it was boring

But it really did help anyway in the couple of months I used it, but you can save the money if you just practice being aware of the tension you have on your playing anywhere. Then just start very (Veeery!) slow.. When I learned songs back then I started at speed of 60 bpm and played 4 beat notes(1 note in 4 beats) and then raise it from there. Right now I think that might've been a little too slow, as it gets frustrating but at least it helps
#8
The most effective and correct way to practice a song is to practice it properly, not fudge the bits you don't know properly or miss out parts that are too hard. In all honesty that was a really lazy, half-arsed attempt at playing something.

If you want to play that song then make the effort to learn it properly. You need to know exactly what it is you're trying to play before you worry about how fast you can play it. FOr that song you might as well start again at the beginning. Break it down into manageable chunks, figure out how to play each one accurately at a slow speed and work on building the speed gradually. Your picking is all over the place and your hands aren't particularly well synced up, you need to be working on that song at least at half the speed you're trying to play it at if you want to iron out the mistakes and play all the notes you've been missing.
Actually called Mark!

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#9
Quote by steven seagull
The most effective and correct way to practice a song is to practice it properly, not fudge the bits you don't know properly or miss out parts that are too hard. In all honesty that was a really lazy, half-arsed attempt at playing something.

If you want to play that song then make the effort to learn it properly. You need to know exactly what it is you're trying to play before you worry about how fast you can play it. FOr that song you might as well start again at the beginning. Break it down into manageable chunks, figure out how to play each one accurately at a slow speed and work on building the speed gradually. Your picking is all over the place and your hands aren't particularly well synced up, you need to be working on that song at least at half the speed you're trying to play it at if you want to iron out the mistakes and play all the notes you've been missing.

Thank you Steven.
I fully understand, but there is one question I feel left out.
HOW do I practice these chunks, I am of course talking about the correct way to practice it. How I hold the instrument, how often and for how long should I practice these chunks (say the intro for an example). I just feel I do everything wrong, don't like my tone, don't like how I pick the strings, how it all feels. It's just wrong.
#10
In all honesty the best thing to do is practice things until you're doing them correctly - there's actually a pretty decent video lesson that pops up next to your youtube vid. You have to wait a while to get to the useful bit but all it does is play the bits at half speed and show you the tabs, that should be enough for you to get an idea of what it is you're actually aiming for.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtwzwNqwJ7Q&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhUXUKkFPFg&feature=related

You do really need to know what something is supposed to sound like before you try and play it. Windows Media Player will slow music down to half speed if you're struggling to pick out all the notes. Once you properly know what it is youre' supposed to be doing you just have to practice as slow as it takes for you to be able to play through the passage cleanly, accurately and consistently. That means picking notes at the same time you fret them and only picking the notes that are there, not picking extra ones or missing some out. If you balls up then you should start again, otherwise all you end up doing is training yourself to play something wrong.

A metronome will help immensely as it allows you to keep a steady beat, once you're playing something comfortablty and consistenly at that slower speed, which may well be a snail's pace, then you can bump the metronome up a little and work on it at a slightly higher tempo.

If you don't have a metrnome there's plenty of online ones http://www.metronomeonline.com/
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

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i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


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#11
I like to put my guitar on clean, light up a smoke and double pick slowly on any chord. BUT watch my picking hand. Watching your self and other great guitarist is a great way to build technique.

I also like to fret notes without picking them. Your objective is to keep your fingers as close to the fretboard as possible while playing. the only way to do this is doing it slow.

Look up some great guitar players and see how they are fretting notes and picking.
#12
Quote by steven seagull
In all honesty the best thing to do is practice things until you're doing them correctly - there's actually a pretty decent video lesson that pops up next to your youtube vid. You have to wait a while to get to the useful bit but all it does is play the bits at half speed and show you the tabs, that should be enough for you to get an idea of what it is you're actually aiming for.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BtwzwNqwJ7Q&feature=related
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dhUXUKkFPFg&feature=related

You do really need to know what something is supposed to sound like before you try and play it. Windows Media Player will slow music down to half speed if you're struggling to pick out all the notes. Once you properly know what it is youre' supposed to be doing you just have to practice as slow as it takes for you to be able to play through the passage cleanly, accurately and consistently. That means picking notes at the same time you fret them and only picking the notes that are there, not picking extra ones or missing some out. If you balls up then you should start again, otherwise all you end up doing is training yourself to play something wrong.

A metronome will help immensely as it allows you to keep a steady beat, once you're playing something comfortablty and consistenly at that slower speed, which may well be a snail's pace, then you can bump the metronome up a little and work on it at a slightly higher tempo.

If you don't have a metrnome there's plenty of online ones http://www.metronomeonline.com/

Thanks, those videos are good. That guy nails that song.
But why does he sound so good, he has an awesome tone, is it because of his rig?
Or just that he is a tremendously good guitar player?

Oh and when I use a metrone, am I supposed to hit a not everytime I hear the "click" from the metrone?
#13
It's a combination of both, his technique is spot on but he'll also have some decent gear too. The thing with good gear is it can make a good guitarist sound better, but a bad guitarist will still sound bad. I wouldn't worry about tone too much at this stage though, you really need to focus on the basics of technique at the moment.

As far as the metronome goes for a song like Phantom I'd say stick it around 40-60 bpm initially, you can't really say something as straightforward as " play one note per click" because notes in music have different durations, you can say "play one whole note for each click", or "play one quarter-note for each click", but that still depends on you being able to distinguish betweem those different types of note in the song itself. Best thing to do is treat the metronome as the snare drum marking every 4th beat and figure out how it all fits together by listening to the track.
Actually called Mark!

Quote by TNfootballfan62
People with a duck for their avatar always give good advice.

...it's a seagull

Quote by Dave_Mc
i wanna see a clip of a recto buying some groceries.


stuffmycatswatchontv.tumblr.com
#14
Quote by steven seagull
It's a combination of both, his technique is spot on but he'll also have some decent gear too. The thing with good gear is it can make a good guitarist sound better, but a bad guitarist will still sound bad. I wouldn't worry about tone too much at this stage though, you really need to focus on the basics of technique at the moment.

As far as the metronome goes for a song like Phantom I'd say stick it around 40-60 bpm initially, you can't really say something as straightforward as " play one note per click" because notes in music have different durations, you can say "play one whole note for each click", or "play one quarter-note for each click", but that still depends on you being able to distinguish betweem those different types of note in the song itself. Best thing to do is treat the metronome as the snare drum marking every 4th beat and figure out how it all fits together by listening to the track.

Perfect explantion, thank you so much (again).
I will set my metronome to 40bpm and work very slowly on the intro first.
Then move on, when I feel I got that one down.