#1
hey guys im in crisis, musicaly ive been going through alot:

ive been playing guitar for 4 years more or less (badly, might i add ive had no theory study up until a month or so ago). a few months ago I opend a thread about my theory problem (that being that i had learnT NONE!) and to conquer this problem I found a guitar teacher, ive had 6 lessons and will only be having a couple more and then take a break until i can afford more lessons.

My problem is that I worry whether I even care for the music, do even care about the guitar or have I just been forcing this on myslef to become the next best thing.
I remember when I first picked up a guitar and EMBARRASSINGLY I did so because I fell in love with nirvana and I wanted to learn the music, I wanted to be like my heros ( I KNOW very gay !). I was completely drawn to artists who died early deaths,
(childish, im completely aware of this, i feel stupid just mentioning it).

but I started to enjoy it, then matured musically and played blues and various other artist's work. But up to this day I just wonder do really care for music, there have been times when I really get into somthing and i DO have a passion for music to perform professionally? have i just been forcing this on myself ? , this mindless funk of being a great guitarist for the image, being some tormented genuis?
#2
Keep your music a hobby that you love, and forget about theory if you're forcing yourself to learn it

It's much cooler to be a great kick-ass musician while not being a professional musician
#3
Quote by Aindreas
Keep your music a hobby that you love, and forget about theory if you're forcing yourself to learn it

It's much cooler to be a great kick-ass musician while not being a professional musician


I do both, i have no social life im a sado, a confused one
#4
Sometimes I feel like I am not in the mood to practice and I get discouraged as well. I have been playing for 8 years and I find that I am very to want to learn something new and switching gears all the time. The reason for this is because I hear something and instantly I want to be able to play it. For me, the rick is to love what you play and play what you love. Find music that you really love and you will not abandon it. Maybe you should look into different styles of music for inspiration. You have to try to rekindle your passion and listening would be the best way.
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#5
Quote by 8008l322
I do both, i have no social life im a sado, a confused one



Do both? What both? And stop pitying yourself. I replaced most of my social life with music, yet I have absolutely no intention to make something I love to do into something I have to do.
#6
While you might feel that you initially got into the guitar because of some rather lame reasons, it sounds like you ended up falling in love with it on the way. So yes, I'd say that your love of music is very real.

Btw, wanting to play like your heroes is not gay. It's the reason a good 50% of people pick up guitar.
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#7
This is from Van Hamersmith .......

I have no advice or really anything to say to motivate you. I really, really believe that motivation has to come from within. No one else can make you want something, and no one else can make you enjoy something. Because those are the reasons people play guitar. Either they WANT to play, or they want to be in a band, or make a lot of money, or get chicks, or please their egos, or whatever, or they just genuinely enjoy playing. A lot of the time both were true at the same time.

But if you don't want to play, or you don't enjoy playing enough to choose your guitar over your video games, then that's that. You're done. Maybe you'll pick it up for a few minutes here and there, but really, you're done.
#8
Quote by dopelope
This is from Van Hamersmith .......

I have no advice or really anything to say to motivate you. I really, really believe that motivation has to come from within. No one else can make you want something, and no one else can make you enjoy something. Because those are the reasons people play guitar. Either they WANT to play, or they want to be in a band, or make a lot of money, or get chicks, or please their egos, or whatever, or they just genuinely enjoy playing. A lot of the time both were true at the same time.

But if you don't want to play, or you don't enjoy playing enough to choose your guitar over your video games, then that's that. You're done. Maybe you'll pick it up for a few minutes here and there, but really, you're done.


if im not playing somthing that is fun or i enjoy then i get bored, or i even tend to want to stop playing but i force myself to carry on, i pretty much get bored because I force myself to learn pages and pages of tabelature (THIS IS WRONG, im aware of this) but their have been times when ive played a piece ive made up myself that gets me so into it and gets me so emotional.
#9
try write your own songs! it's great playing other peoples stuff and all that, but if you want to really connect with things, try write a song about something that means a lot to you. maybe!
#10
I don't see any point in forcing yourself to do something you don't want to do when it's essentially a hobby. Hobbies are supposed to be fun. Music is not necessarily a 'discipline' and it requires as much attention as you're willing to give it.

If you have aspirations of becoming a professional musician then you do have to WORK at it. Work isn't always fun, but you do it for the long term benefits. I think you need to consider what your goals are and take action accordingly.
#11
Quote by Froggy McHop
I don't see any point in forcing yourself to do something you don't want to do when it's essentially a hobby. Hobbies are supposed to be fun. Music is not necessarily a 'discipline' and it requires as much attention as you're willing to give it.

If you have aspirations of becoming a professional musician then you do have to WORK at it. Work isn't always fun, but you do it for the long term benefits. I think you need to consider what your goals are and take action accordingly.


im just wandering if these aspirations to becoming a professional are indeed purely fantasy, or are they not even aspirations, it shard to explain. maybe it was all a delusioned nothing
#12
I'm inclined to think you're over thinking it and making it more complicated. Is it possible to THINK you're happy? I mean, if you feel happy, you are happy, right?

And if you want to do something, you want to do it. You may, thinking about it more, realise it isn't what you want, but you still wanted it for a short while.

That probably just confused you even more tbh. But I don't like people who aren't sure of what they want. I'm not sure what could be more obvious to someone other than whether or not they're in pain. You may want nothing at the moment, or you may want several things and you're not sure which to go for, which of course requires thought and consideration, but you shouldn't be confused about whether or not you want something or not.

Maybe that's just me anyway. This post has gotten way too woolly and pffft now.
#13
Sounds like you are going through a bit of a hard time. First thing I would say is hang in there. I've been there too many times to mention and one thing I have learned is things will get better.

I started playing guitar out of a love for music and an earnest desire to express myself. However because of some sort of weird insecurity I got fixated by this need to try and become the absolute best musician possible. In some ways its not a bad thing, in that you do learn a lot and gain a fair amount of skill. However, as I think you have discovered, it can be something of a passion killer: the goal has changed from expressing yourself and being creative to trying to be the 'best' (whatever that is!). Something we used to love becomes something we flog ourselves at to try and achieve more. It just becomes work. If this what you have been experiencing I would say:

1. Stop playing for a little bit. Go for a bike ride, get out and get some fresh air. Go meet some cool people somewhere. Listen to some music, music you enjoy. Remember what it was that initially got you inspired to play. There was absolutely nothing wrong with being influenced by Nirvana. Kurt Cobain wrote some incredibly direct, emotive and very powerful music. Now, if you said Beyonce was your idol I would have been worried, very worried indeed....(!)

2. Know that you yourself are ok, and, frankly, pretty darn courageous for posting such an emotionally open message on a public forum. What's more, you don't have to be the world's greatest guitarist to write and/or play some great music. This has been hugely helpful for me. To be perfectly honest I have yet to hear an album from a highly technical guitar player that has really made me feel anything emotionally. I've never shed a tear or felt an ounce of joy listening to any 'shredder'. Check out the audience when any of these guys perform live. It's full of guys with their arms folded examining the guitarist. No one is really grooving, laughing, swayed by the music. I'm not sure if I want this??

Anyway, hang in there champ. Wishing you all the best in your musical endeavours.

Andrew
#14
There's nothing wrong with being influenced by a band like Nirvana to get into guitar. Everyone has something that inspired them. For me it was Flea's bass line in the chili peppers' version of Higher Ground. That was 5 years ago, look at me now: heading to college next year of Music Ed.

You shouldn't have to be unsure whether or not you LIKE music. How about you put it to the test. Stop playing guitar for an indeterminate amount of time. Don't force anything on yourself. If you feel like you miss playing guitar, or that it's hard to resist playing, I'd say that's a good way to determine that you are interested in it. If you go a long time without ever having a desire to pick it up again, maybe it's not for you.

That's usually how I conquer rough patches, I take it easy and let my brain rest for a bit. Maybe focus more on listening to/studying music. Maybe start listening to a new genre. Anything to break the monotony.
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#15
Hmm, usually these feeling come up when the person realises that they're not as good as they think they are.

If you're asking us to use our super powers to read you mind and determine whether you care or not, well we can't. Only you can answer that question.

The only thing I'll say is that if you've been playing for four years, and have not joined a band, yes it's questionable whether you have the drive to be a performing guitarist or not.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#16
Here's what I have noticed...

When someone is really learning and doing well, a byproduct of that is the urge to keep learning. I'm not so sure, in this situation based upon your post, that it's all you. I appreciate your honesty, but I am wondering if the problem isn't you, but rather, the dynamics of your lessons and instructor. If you were gung ho, and now you have a teacher, what happened? It could be he set out to sea in a metaphorical boat, and you look all around you and you have no idea where you are going, you can't see where what he is teaching or focusing upon, is going to get you to your place that you want to be as a guitar player, anytime soon.

What you are describing, I commonly hear from students that arrive as tired refugees from other teachers, books, being self taught, you name it, in one form or another they are tired and lost and they need to see something. In fact, I'm picking up a borderline sense discouragment from you...

If you had been self taught and hadnt mentioned a teacher, I might side with the others here, but being as you HAVE a teacher, I'm thinking that dynamic is what's brought you to this place.

A byproduct of learning what you're after, is the desire to keep going and learn more....

Does that make sense?

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 25, 2011,
#18
Yeah great advice, can even be applied to non guitar-related problems.
Thanks everybody!
#19
One thing I do, because I've had that problem also, the not feeling the music, is I take a day abandon theory, and just play music.
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#20
Theory is good, but needed. IF YOU EVER WANT TO TEACH GUITAR or making a career, I advise learning it, but if it's just a hobby, just play what you like.
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#21
Quote by Sean0913
Here's what I have noticed...

When someone is really learning and doing well, a byproduct of that is the urge to keep learning. I'm not so sure, in this situation based upon your post, that it's all you. I appreciate your honesty, but I am wondering if the problem isn't you, but rather, the dynamics of your lessons and instructor. If you were gung ho, and now you have a teacher, what happened? It could be he set out to sea in a metaphorical boat, and you look all around you and you have no idea where you are going, you can't see where what he is teaching or focusing upon, is going to get you to your place that you want to be as a guitar player, anytime soon.

What you are describing, I commonly hear from students that arrive as tired refugees from other teachers, books, being self taught, you name it, in one form or another they are tired and lost and they need to see something. In fact, I'm picking up a borderline sense discouragment from you...

If you had been self taught and hadnt mentioned a teacher, I might side with the others here, but being as you HAVE a teacher, I'm thinking that dynamic is what's brought you to this place.

A byproduct of learning what you're after, is the desire to keep going and learn more....

Does that make sense?

Best,

Sean

Great point. The right teacher can make all the difference.
#22
Quote by andrew_k
Great point. The right teacher can make all the difference.


thanks for the comment dude, but my guitar lessons have been pretty fun so far, ive gone over the blues scale Am pent blues position 1, blues scale postion 4. its been pretty fun (a little annyoing learning it with a metranome).
#23
Quote by andrew_k
Sounds like you are going through a bit of a hard time. First thing I would say is hang in there. I've been there too many times to mention and one thing I have learned is things will get better.

I started playing guitar out of a love for music and an earnest desire to express myself. However because of some sort of weird insecurity I got fixated by this need to try and become the absolute best musician possible. In some ways its not a bad thing, in that you do learn a lot and gain a fair amount of skill. However, as I think you have discovered, it can be something of a passion killer: the goal has changed from expressing yourself and being creative to trying to be the 'best' (whatever that is!). Something we used to love becomes something we flog ourselves at to try and achieve more. It just becomes work. If this what you have been experiencing I would say:

1. Stop playing for a little bit. Go for a bike ride, get out and get some fresh air. Go meet some cool people somewhere. Listen to some music, music you enjoy. Remember what it was that initially got you inspired to play. There was absolutely nothing wrong with being influenced by Nirvana. Kurt Cobain wrote some incredibly direct, emotive and very powerful music. Now, if you said Beyonce was your idol I would have been worried, very worried indeed....(!)

2. Know that you yourself are ok, and, frankly, pretty darn courageous for posting such an emotionally open message on a public forum. What's more, you don't have to be the world's greatest guitarist to write and/or play some great music. This has been hugely helpful for me. To be perfectly honest I have yet to hear an album from a highly technical guitar player that has really made me feel anything emotionally. I've never shed a tear or felt an ounce of joy listening to any 'shredder'. Check out the audience when any of these guys perform live. It's full of guys with their arms folded examining the guitarist. No one is really grooving, laughing, swayed by the music. I'm not sure if I want this??

Anyway, hang in there champ. Wishing you all the best in your musical endeavours.

Andrew



thanks man your comment put a smile on face, i think ill stick to playing
#24
cheers lads for all the support im going to continue to play, and maybe one day take a little more seriously and try and join a band. THANK'S!