#1
Hello! I've just ordered a plugin from Musicians Friend for $50. They usually sell this plugin for around $300 or so. The Plugin is Focusrite Forte Suite, which is just a channel strip plugin for Pro Tools that is supposed to emulate the vintage Focusrite Forte console. Anyway it, the plugin comes with a bunch of dynamic tools like EQ and Compression and gates and expanders etc.

My question is, do some EQ's perform better than other EQ's? Do some compressors perform better than other compressors? (Keep in mind this is all digital) Are the dramatic price differences between some of these plugins just because they are more comfortable? Do you get what I'm trying to ask?

Pro Tools comes with a very easy to use visual EQ and a Visual Compressor, but allot of times people like to run different EQ and Compression plugins. So are some actually better than the others?

Also, if anyone has ever used channel strip plugins, could you tell me if they make anything easier? Thanks!
#2
Yes.
Every plug-in is different just like every guitar is different from the next.
Some are easier to use, some do a better job, some have different features, etc.
#3
Quote by TechnicolorType
Yes.
Every plug-in is different just like every guitar is different from the next.
Some are easier to use, some do a better job, some have different features, etc.


Right but what is it that may be different? I'm guessing maybe some EQ's are more accurate to the freq. you have the band set to, and maybe the Q has a broader range or something.

Also to everyone who looks at this thread, I just realized my title is a bit misleading, so I'm sorry for the confusion!
#4
every eq is different. there isn't one specific thing that varies. every single thing about them can vary from the next.
#5
Basically, a lot of the differences between how the EQs and Compressors work come down to how the sound is colored. Each will change the sound outside of its role as an EQ/Compressor.
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#6
Quote by lockwolf
Basically, a lot of the differences between how the EQs and Compressors work come down to how the sound is colored. Each will change the sound outside of its role as an EQ/Compressor.



Really? I would have just thought that as it's job implies, the EQ will only affect sound by cutting or boosting a certain freq. band. So are you saying the processing will color the sound?
#7
Quote by Austindicola
Really? I would have just thought that as it's job implies, the EQ will only affect sound by cutting or boosting a certain freq. band. So are you saying the processing will color the sound?


It's because most of those plugins are modeled after vintage analog gear. Most analog gear is said to color the sound in different ways, and the plugin developers try and capture/model the coloration.
#8
Quote by Austindicola
Really? I would have just thought that as it's job implies, the EQ will only affect sound by cutting or boosting a certain freq. band. So are you saying the processing will color the sound?


Yes. That's why they model channel strips from Focusrite, SSL, Neve, API. They want to bring the sound of those analog boards to the digital domain. Any one who's used the real gear will say that the plugins never sound like the real unit. Even real units of the same make and model can sound different. But, that's not to say it's not worth it to get some good plugins.

All eq's and compressors (even plugins) process the sound a little differently. You just use what sounds best to you. Sometimes I go for my SSL compressor, sometimes I'll use the stock one in pro tools. What ever gets the job done better.
#9
Try and look at it this way - just like all analogue gear uses different components (and even with similar components, no component can be 100% identical to another, as this is humanly impossible), much the same as the coding behind different plug-ins is always going to differ slightly as people go about things in different ways to achieve their desired results. That's before you even look at software that emulates analogue gear!

To put it one way, EQ and compressors aren't simply someone writing a code that says 'increase volume of __ Hz by __ dB'. Just like with analogue gear, the desired changes are side effects of different processes combined together. For example: analogue EQ's work (in a simplified way) by a series of filters designed to restrict the flow of current by certain amounts, and depending on whether they feed forward and so on, if the signal is combined with the original (think like when you have a 'wet/dry' control on an effect) the differences between the two signals cause the boosting/cutting desired, also affecting the phase relationship between parts of the signal.

'Digital' EQs can work in many different ways, as they have the advantage of computer processing to do many things to a signal, rather than just what components are in the signal path. EQ's can work in numerous ways and I really need to leave the flat now to get some shopping, but I doubt anyone wants me to try and explain what I think I remember about EQ plug-in design from lectures that were a few months ago and I haven't revisited yet In short though, you can exploit different side-effects of audio processes to create EQ plug-ins.
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#10
Quote by Austindicola
Also, if anyone has ever used channel strip plugins, could you tell me if they make anything easier?


No plugin really makes "anything easier". You still have to do the work and tweak the settings to get what you want and it takes some time to learn. The only thing that a channel strip really does is offer a number of effects in one go. Personally I prefer to mix and match EQ's and compressors so I rarely reach for a channel strip (except the occasional use of a URS on backing vocals).
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#11
Quote by ebon00
No plugin really makes "anything easier".


Actually, there is one. Toontracks EZMix is pretty much a drag and drop plugin that makes things as simple as possible.

Though if I catch anyone here using it, I will personally break their interface in front of them since if you're too lazy to learn to mix, you shouldn't be recording in the first place.
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