#1
Well basically my guitar life started about 9-10 months ago. I started taking lessons from a sorta relative who's played 10 years and is insanely good. One day he just pretty much decided to stop teaching me and left me hanging. I've been learning some stuff on my own since then, and I think I've progressed really well compared to all my friends who have been playing for 2-5 years (My youtube with some guitar stuff ) but I want to UNDERSTAND the music, not just play what other people are playing.

My idea about pretty much everything is don't just do it, dissect it. I'm a computer guru first, and a guitar player second, and I've torn into many computers to understand how they work. Ever since guitar came along, however, it's become my passion (when I'm not playing, I'm thinking about playing!) I've been trying to learn theory, but everything I look at simply just makes me go "oh shit..." and get intimidated and just kinda close it. It seems like there's no easy, beginner-friendly way of learning it, and I want it to apply to GUITAR, not just theory in general. I've tried Fretboard Theory by Desi Serna, which I read was the best and simplest to grasp, and I still can't understand it.

The minor 3rd and 5ths and all this crap just pretty much blows my mind. And I would like a book or something, not just various tutorials from numerous people. I can't learn that way, especially since everyone goes about it a bit differently. I just want that beginner feeling back, the excitement of it! I may be going at theory too soon, but I feel the sooner the better I guess. I want to be able to fire up a jam track, and throw something nice out over it. I like melodic stuff, melodic blues, metal, rock, anything. Just something that flows like water. I guess I'm just wanting some advice from the super gurus over @ UG.

Tons of thanks,

Kodi
#4
Sadly, no. You could always just copy and paste whatever article you're on into Word and just print it that way.
Quote by Joshua Garcia
my chemical romance are a bunch of homos making love to a mic and you like that cuz your a huge gay wad. You should feel pathetic for being such a gaywad you gay mcr loving gaywad olllol.
#6
^ Good summary.
Quote by Joshua Garcia
my chemical romance are a bunch of homos making love to a mic and you like that cuz your a huge gay wad. You should feel pathetic for being such a gaywad you gay mcr loving gaywad olllol.
#7
Quote by white_ibanez10
copy paste on word

Yeah, but the formatting goes out of whack. :S Not to mention the pictures. This is a pretty sick guide though. Pretty much all I want, all in one thing, without the super high price slapped on it! Appreciate this, and I guess the way he teaches it is indeed the way to go. Don't worry so much about why it works in the beginning, just know that it does work and I'll understand more with time. Sitting here jamming out some A minor pent. right now

Tons of thanks,

Kodi
#9
Quote by Sean0913
We teach those very things you are asking about and wanting to do/understand. Have a look at our site, if you have any questions, send me a PM.

Also, I'd be remiss not to mention that user, Guitar Munky teaches over Skype and says his first lesson is free.

Best,

Sean

You're the kind of guy I wish lived around here. The only guy we have teaching lessons here is an arrogant asshole. (I took my guitar for a tune up, he got the intonation on the D string screwy so I took it back and told him. His reply: "I did it so it's gotta be right." How stereotypical of an egotist!) Guitar, like anything, gets frustrating when you're first starting. I've always had a "gotta be the best" mindset I guess. I'm the best in my class in academics, and I expect the same in music. It's just so hard to dive into something. I want to know NOW, but I can't absorb it all at once. I guess my goal is I want to be able to write my own simple chord progressions and be able to write my own little improv stuff over it. Nothing super complex, but it'd just be deeply gratifying to me I guess One thing I do wonder off hand though, is this: I don't play light stuff most of the time. I prefer heavy distorted songs. How would I be able to write a DISTORTED chord progression? I get the basis behind standard chords, but power chords and the like I don't understand. Sure I play them all day long, but I don't get how I'd find out what scale to use over them if you get what I'm asking.

I also read your guitar mentor thread, you're the kind of guy I look up to and want to be to someone else some day. It's actually my dream to open a guitar lessons and repair shop to put the guy I mentioned earlier out of business. He sold a little kid in the store a First Act electric for 200 BUCKS! and was telling him, and I quote "this is an amazing guitar for a beginner. You're pretty much stealing it from us for so cheap.") Sorry for the rant, but I hate people who take advantage of others or just act as if they're leagues above others. Lack of knowledge to me doesn't mean stupidity. It just means what it is: they haven't learned something yet. Why take advantage of the lack of knowledge and exploit them?

I'm loving UG so far. AWESOME to get to talk with fellow players out there, as my home in the middle of nowhere hasn't got much to offer in the musical area.
#10
Simply put a power chord is neither major or minor, because it lacks what we call the 3rd. For the sake of simplicity here, let's just say that the 3rd is the only note in any chord ever that determines if its a major or minor type chord.

So because of this, it really isnt hard to apply music theory to rock or metal, or distortion.

Distortion is great for tone and attitude, but it doesnt mean that you can't apply theory all over the place.

So say I have a chord progression in E, and in "clean theory" (non distorted chords) a certain progression would be E G#m C#m A and B, I could make these all power chords, and apply what I know of theory, over them, like... E5 G#5 C#5 A5 and B5. The same application is possible.

Furthermore I could "play" with these forms a little by adding little powerchord extensions ala Dream Theatre, like add a 9th to every power chord, or certain ones. Theory and understanding what Im doing, and how it all can connect on the guitar, can be used in every single genre, and if you are a metal guy, no problem, you can still know what youre doing and how to apply it to your music. That opens far more doors for you creatively in expressing yourself.

Re your guitar instructor: I don't think being good is an excuse to be a jerk, and usually thats a self-admission of a weak character...just see it for what it is and move on. If the guy has a weak personality, then adding ego to the mix will only make it worse. When you see that just shake your head and move on, no need to make their problem into your problem.


Re: Your goal to write simple progressions etc., those are very doable. Like I said we do these things all the time and teach them.

Re: Unethical business practices, like mirepresenting the value of that guitar: The truth is most people want your money, and they have no vested interest in whether you ever go far or not as a musician. They just want their register to ring. That's what I experienced when I was coming up, and always wanted a place where I could go where someone was looking out for me, and really trying to help me. I never found that, but 5 years ago when I started my guitar shop, I made one pledge to try to be the kind of store that I'd always wished I could have found, but never did. And to always try and be the kind of teacher I would have loved to find, but never did.

In my opinion doing things that are wrong and unjust and unethical, have a very short shelf life. Those that do them, I see as more or less saying to themselves "I dont have the intrinsiic value within myself to be able to offer something fairly" Once youve admitted that your a cheat and swindler, which is what this guy did, he's pretty much set his course. My dad used to tell me, "Let him work himself right out of business". When you do well, you'll be known and it makes it easy to stand out amid those who have no heart in this business. I have always, and will always stick to my guns and core values. It's what makes me who I am.

Best,

Sean
#11
@Sean (didn't wanna quote all that and make a huge post,) is there some sort of power chord guide or anything around here? I know I should search, but I figure you'd know the best one for someone just starting to look at. So if I had say an E5 power chord, I could do E major OR minor pent?
#12
Ha, you sound like me; I'd rather learn by tooling around than by studying. This method actually does work for guitar. Some of the best guitar players out their learned how to compose by just tooling around. But, the value of learning theory is immense, so I highly recommend learning it. My biggest advice, since we seem to be a like, is to not take it too seriously. You don't have to learn everything in one sitting, and you don't have to get it the first time around. I learned from musictheory.net at first. I highly recommend taking notes. You don't need to look at them afterward, it just helps in retaining the finer details. Making charts of intervals and chords and what not is also helpful. Good luck!
i don't know why i feel so dry
#13
Quote by Eastwinn
Ha, you sound like me; I'd rather learn by tooling around than by studying. This method actually does work for guitar. Some of the best guitar players out their learned how to compose by just tooling around. But, the value of learning theory is immense, so I highly recommend learning it. My biggest advice, since we seem to be a like, is to not take it too seriously. You don't have to learn everything in one sitting, and you don't have to get it the first time around. I learned from musictheory.net at first. I highly recommend taking notes. You don't need to look at them afterward, it just helps in retaining the finer details. Making charts of intervals and chords and what not is also helpful. Good luck!

Yeah that's pretty much it XD I feel like I gotta learn it all now.