#1
So.. i've been playing guitar for sometime now but the problem is.. I only play covers, nothing original
My question is (and this is the beginning for so many questions).. If I am playing a backing track to solo over it, how do I construct the backing track... ie what chords go with each other and I only have to play majors and minors ? I cant play a progression in a major key and add a minor to it?
I have zero information about this and i will appreciate if someone would have the time and information to fill the missing part i have about music theory.
Thanks guys.
#2
Wow, i think the best thing you could do for now is check out these articles http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/search.php?value=crusade&search_type=columns

Go through them all in your own time and even if you think you know some of it, don't skip it you might find out something new.

Those columns really helped me out tieing up some lose ends in my theory and i hope they help you too.
Have fun
#3
major scales have minor major and diminished chords in them. This is called harmonizing.

You compare any giving note within the scale to the scales degrees. If it doesnt match up you can make them match changing the quality of the chord. Major minor or diminished. These rules are not strict. any note that isnt within that key is called accidentals. Its ok to use any notes you want.

I would just make something up. write out all the note examine it well. see whats going on in there. Use theory to break down songs not to make them up.
#5
Quote by metalmetalhead
Use theory to break down songs not to make them up.


i'm not so sure i'd agree completely with this statement, but for the most part it's definitely true. in some cases it's better to construct what you want using theory (i do this all the time, but that's because i write a lot in the baroque style, so i need to think constantly about counterpoint).

someone who really knows theory well should be able to do both break down songs and compose according to it. but i think what metalhead might have meant to say was don't compose using ONLY theory, which i'd have to agree with. long story short, you can miss out on a lot if you stick only to one method.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#6
Well it's like I said zero knowledge of music theory and composing, I can't pick my guitar and jam along a backing track..
Where do I start? Learning the music theory?
Thanks guys for replying and SumFX for the articles, I will go through them shortly.
#9
Here's a good Idea. Transcribe the notes of the solo and lead parts. Then find the most common notes played and just put them into chords. That's the best advice I can give.
Guitars: Amps
1. Shecter Damien 6 1. Line 6 Spider III
2. Yamaha Pacifica (RED) 2. Drive CD 20
#10
Thanks for the help guys, I really appreciate it.
I will do my best in music theory and I'm sure that I will post more threads as I read more about it.
#11
You can get some programs to help, like Auralia (pretty cheap for students).

It's hard to get theory by yourself right to start, having someone help you out and tutor you is going to make things infinitely easier. Plus, there's no way anybody on here can give you a one-post explanation of chordal harmony.

I'll give it a start, though. I'll assume you have basic key knowledge. That is, in the key of C major, there is C, D, E, F, G, A, and B. To break that into a scale, each note will have a number 1-7 (C is the 1, D is the 2, and so on, but they are written as Roman numerals, generally).

These notes of the scale also apply to the chords that fit tonally within the key, fitting this pattern: I - ii - iii - IV - V - vi - vii

The upper case numbers imply that there are major chords with a major third (interval of two whole steps between the first and third degree of the scale/chord), lower cases implying a minor third (three half steps between the first and third degrees), but with the vii being diminished. I'll get that later.

The most basic chords are called triads, and have, fittingly, three notes. They are composed of the first, third, and fifth degrees of the scale. So, on C, that would be C - E - G, a C major triad. The distance between the C and G is a perfect fifth, but we don't have to indicate that in the chord name, it's assumed. However, if you start it on B, in the key of C (no flats or sharps, both being types of accidentals), you get B - D -F. You get the minor third between B and D, but B and F are not a perfect fifth apart. A perfect fifth is an interval of seven half steps, and the perfect fifth on a B would be F#. The F, being six half steps, makes it a diminished fifth.

So, we have names for these chords. I is the tonic, ii the supertonic, ii is the mediant, IV is the subdominant, V is the dominant, vi is the submediant, and vii is called either the leading tone or subtonic.

The dominants want to fall to the tonic, and super tonics like going to the dominant. The subdominant also wants to fall to the tonic. These sorts of progressions are incredibly common. That is, I - ii - V - I, I -IV - I - V -I, or any variants therein.

That only scratches the surface, though, and is hardly in-depth. If you want to learn more, definitely look into study of theory (it's honestly not as daunting as it seems), or tutoring/lessons.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs
#12
A lot of good advice posted in this topic.

Black blood, being self taught is not easy at all, and you have my respect for trying, and if we can help you as you move forward, and you get lost we'll do our best! There are a lot of good helpful people here, and you will learn a lot from them. We've all started where you are and we know how tough it can be to know what to do, when first starting out.

Best,

Sean
#13
Quote by Sean0913
A lot of good advice posted in this topic.

Black blood, being self taught is not easy at all, and you have my respect for trying, and if we can help you as you move forward, and you get lost we'll do our best! There are a lot of good helpful people here, and you will learn a lot from them. We've all started where you are and we know how tough it can be to know what to do, when first starting out.

Best,

Sean


Agreed. Self-teaching can help you, but there are no words for how helpful an instructor of some sort can be.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs