#1
Could somebody explain to me what tube sag is? I heard it is somehow related to the "looseness" of an amplifier and that, for example, a Marshall is not a "loose" amp. Can anybody explain this?
#2
I've always heard it related to amps with tube rectifiers. Tube rectifiers have an internal resistance that causes the high voltage to the tubes to drop during high volume. This causes a form of compression called sag. Not sure if people consider looseness to be the result of sag, but I don't think so.
#4
Quote by PanamaJack666
I met a girl with tube sag once. I ended up in the clinic.

..obvious virgin is obvious

i always thought that tube sag referred to the "attack" time of the natural compression that occurs in a cranked tube amp, or something to that effect.
I like analogue Solid State amps that make no effort to be "tube-like", and I'm proud of it...

...A little too proud, to be honest.
#5
Think of it as a volume "bloom" if you will.

Basically, think of a turned up amp. When you hit the strings really hard, the amp volume "gives" for a very small amount of time, and then the sound... sounds, if you will. Really crappy explanation, I know. But it's the best I can do atm.
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How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

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#6
it's something associated with cranked vintage amps...

it's kinda squishy

kinda chewy

but still kinda smooth

it's like gum with a really hard shell. but not too hard.
Prs se Holcomb is the answer
#7
And once again Min saves the thread with his poetic descriptions

That's actually a great analogy...
--

How do you say "I'm okay" to an answering machine?

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#8
it's something associated with cranked vintage amps...

it's kinda squishy

kinda chewy

but still kinda smooth

it's like gum with a really hard shell. but not too hard.


That helps a ton, thanks. It's surprisingly difficult to describe tone and guitar sounds without hearing it.
Last edited by Frank_Black at Mar 18, 2011,
#9
With regards to "tube" sag, Fly is pretty much on the money. High current demands cause a larger voltage drop due to the internal resistance of the rectifier tube, which in turn makes less voltage available to the power supply caps and hence the power valve plates. So it is causing power output to lower, as opposed to the higher input signal, and this is where the compression occurs.

Undersized power supply and/or undersized power transformer can also cause sag, although not always to the same effect as tube recto sag.
Tastes like chicken, if chicken was a candy.