#1
I have a Fender Standard Stratocaster, and I find that I regularly have to take it to a music store to fix the intonation. Each time I get it set up, I have to come back some months later because the intonation at the 12th fret, especially in high E string, becomes off by almost a half step (the fretted note is flat relative to the harmonic). It's about time for me to take it in again, so I was wondering if there was a way to fix it myself, without having to shell out ~$30 again.

I've tried adjusting the screws in the saddle, but I can't unscrew them anymore or the screw starts coming out, and the 12th fret is still very flat. So any help would be appreciated.
#2
Set the truss rod and the action then reintonate and see if that solves the issue. Sometimes a neck with too much bow and bridge/saddle height can play in the equation. Is the neck sitting in the pocket nice and straight?
#3
if the note at the 12th is sharper than the harmonic then the string needs to be longer

if its flatter than the harmonic then the string needs to be shorter

thats how i remember it

just think "if its too sharp, its too short"

your turning it the wrong way i think
#4
Quote by rickyj
if the note at the 12th is sharper than the harmonic then the string needs to be longer

if its flatter than the harmonic then the string needs to be shorter

thats how i remember it

just think "if its too sharp, its too short"

your turning it the wrong way i think


Read it again he isn't. The note is flat so he therefore needs to shorten the string. He is saying the saddle screw isn't long enough to allow for him to shorten the string.


WAIT just had an idea. you could go to hardware store and get a longer screw which would fit your bridge/saddle? This would give you more room to adjust the saddle and shorten the string. Make sure the guitar has a good set up first though like I said.
#5
Quote by Tyler.Allain
Read it again he isn't. The note is flat so he therefore needs to shorten the string. He is saying the saddle screw isn't long enough to allow for him to shorten the string.



no, he said that he cant unscrew it anymore because the screw is about to come out
#6
If your truss rod is set and your tuned well you can intonate it yourself very easily. Find half the scale length by measuring from the 12th. Then do the same from the 12th to the saddle. Thats where your high E should be for the intonation to be correct. If that doesnt work there might be a problem with your scale length and frett spacing. Hopefully that works for you so you dont have to keep paying someone to do it.
#7
Quote by rickyj
no, he said that he cant unscrew it anymore because the screw is about to come out


Which is the same thing. If the screw is going to come out he has shortened the string as much as possible = the screw isn't long enough to allow for a needed range of adjustment. Like I said dude get a longer screw.
#8
learn how to do the intonation your self and stop paying for it. it's kind of like tuning your guitar except instead of turning a tuning peg you are turning a scew. i find it hard to believe fender would sell a guitar with a screw that was to short to set the guitar up properly.

i wouldn't mess with the truss rod on my own though because i don't want to buy a new neck.
Earth without ART, is just Eh...
#9
Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. But I seem to have solved the problem in a much simpler way than I thought would be necessary...
The strings had to be changed. Yeah. I feel silly now. =P But hey, at least I can play in tune now!
#10
When was the last time you changed strings?
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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#11
Quote by metalzeppelin
learn how to do the intonation your self and stop paying for it. it's kind of like tuning your guitar except instead of turning a tuning peg you are turning a scew. i find it hard to believe fender would sell a guitar with a screw that was to short to set the guitar up properly.

i wouldn't mess with the truss rod on my own though because i don't want to buy a new neck.


I adjusted the truss rod on both my bass and electric guitar yesterday. Its really easy and you can't break the neck if you just go easy on it. Just look up a few videos to make sure you do it right.

I think an important part of playing an instrument is learning how to fix it yourself. I don't plan on paying for anyone to set up my guitar.
#12
Quote by AWACS
When was the last time you changed strings?

About a year ago. Usually I change every month or two, but I got lazy for a few months. Then I didn't bother changing strings because I thought I might as well get that done at the same time as the intonation. So ironic that that was the source of the problem...

Quote by JonnyMonster91
I adjusted the truss rod on both my bass and electric guitar yesterday. Its really easy and you can't break the neck if you just go easy on it. Just look up a few videos to make sure you do it right.

I think an important part of playing an instrument is learning how to fix it yourself. I don't plan on paying for anyone to set up my guitar.

I did that exact same thing yesterday. Both guitar (I was trying to fix it before I realized the strings were the problem) and bass. I was scared I'd break something but I didn't. So now I'm no longer afraid of truss rods, which is nice.
#13
To keep the strings from slowly unraveling I solder the ball end where all the twists are...
#14
Quote by thelosah36
About a year ago. Usually I change every month or two, but I got lazy for a few months. Then I didn't bother changing strings because I thought I might as well get that done at the same time as the intonation. So ironic that that was the source of the problem...

A year Jesus man
#15
Quote by W4RP1G
A year Jesus man

I know, it was bad. The strings were quite dead but I didn't think they would be the source of intonation problems. But they were. Silly me.
#16
Quote by W4RP1G
A year Jesus man


Whats wrong with that? They don't even sound good until about 6 months or so and get some boogers and schmootz in there when you take care of them and use some kind of oil like Fast Fret. New strings sound like Boingoingoingoing to me.