#1
Hey everyone, i just wanted to see if i could get some feedback/advice about my blues improvisation. i've been playing guitar for 6ish years and im mostly into blues tock runk and jazz. anyway here's a video i just made of me playing some blues, its not my best but i'd appreciate any tips or advice.
thanks alot, and I'm sorry if this is in the wrong place, this is my first post on this forum

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8RHrKRY7o0
#2
yup wrong section. anyways you need to learn to play with the chord changes as you just went all over. work on your bends as many were way off. you have the basics down pretty good and did get better as the video went along.
#3
thanks for the reply. can you be a little more specific about playing over the changes? throughout the video i was usually playing some A major pentatonic over the one chord and a minor pentatonic over the four chord, and then pieces of an E 7 arpeggio over the 5 chord...
i appreciate the feedback very much
#4
Quote by masterexploder9
thanks for the reply. can you be a little more specific about playing over the changes? throughout the video i was usually playing some A major pentatonic over the one chord and a minor pentatonic over the four chord, and then pieces of an E 7 arpeggio over the 5 chord...
i appreciate the feedback very much


your timing just didn't flow very well. you play the notes but they lacked the feeling that makes a good blues solo. nothing wrong with what you played but they were very standard sounding licks that didn't really have an individual flair. hope this helps. although this might not sound very positive you have some talent and just need to refine it.
#5
thanks it helps alot. im thinking that i rush through alot of my licks too often, ill have to work on slowing it down
#7
Quote by grohl1987
Nothing technically wrong there but yeah, odd timing and not what I'd call "sweet smooth blues". That name makes me think more of something like these

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtmW2ek7WkQ

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6jCNXASjzMY


yeah i didnt really know what to call the video...and i didnt really know how i was gonna come out going into i just kinda went with it
#8
One thing I'm noticing is that a lot of your bends aren't in tune. (at the beginning at least, I'm writing this as I listen. It's not all, there are some to which this does not apply)
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Quote by Pauldapro
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#9
yeah i didnt really notice that about the bends, but going back now its really bugging me im gonna have to fix that in my playing
#10
Yeah, it's something some people have to work on a lot because they can't hear it as it's happening, while some just can't because they hear it immediately and it annoys the hell out of them.

One other thing, you have a haphazard way of going about your phrasing. You start to get into really soulful, few-note licks that start building a motif and letting those spaces come out and those notes hang there. The next phrase after that is a really quick diatonic run. It's most noticeable when you run one after you leave a bit of a gap, i.e. on the downbeat of the next chord/measure, and you start on the tonic.

There are a few reasons to avoid that, one being that it could get into a habit of perceived safety in tonality, another that it leads to a doubling with the bass player's notes (not in all cases, most of the time), etc.

You definitely have chops, and probably have a pretty wide repertoire of techniques and a metaphorical file folder of licks. The trick is knowing that you only need one or two in a given solo. Why throw it all out at once?
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs
#12
Thanks, man.

There are only a couple things you need to know when you're soloing, in terms of structure (as in, not theory-wise). One thing folks do--guitarists are especially guilty of this--is just play their asses off the whole way through. Horn/wind players can't do that--they have to breathe.

Think of a solo as a conversation (this works especially well in a jazz/blues context, where there is chordal accompaniment). You have something to say, so you start talking. What's something that people universally cannot stand? People not shutting the **** up, going a mile a minute. This is something you've already got a general grasp on, which impressed me, since half of these videos are just guys playing pentatonics in straight sixteenths enough that Zakk Wylde gets a random boner.

You're definitely on the right track, in terms of phrasing. One guideline that helps a lot of people soloing is to think in sort of four-bar phrases. In blues, you don't even need that much, as you went into in the video, with little licks on the last couple of beats of a measure that end on the downbeat of the next.

I'm altering my advice, because I'm back and forth between a theoretical and jazz mindset from school, but a lot can still apply. As much as I can recommend singing your lines as you play them, the biggest thing with the blues is feeling. Can a shredded minor pentatonic arpeggio convey the same feeling as B.B. or Buddy bending a string to the moon? Maybe.


Haha, sorry for the walls of text, I tend to talk a lot when I'm tired.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs
#13
man thats great advice u really seem to know what your talking about. thanks again, ill try to incorporate that into my playing more and more
#14
Haha, I try.

Good luck with the practice, you'll get a hang for the feel--it's just a matter of time. Post up another haha
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs