#1
I know how to read sheet music but I'm really bad at it. Except on drums, the neutral clef is my home so I just glance and figure it out, its when pitch is introduced (even in pitched percussion like tenors or timpani) that I piss myself in fear. I think I can figure out piano chords pretty well when its simple major or minor root position stuff (with 7ths too, but after that it gets sketchy), other than that I am just a horrible sight-reader. If you give me a piece of guitar music written in notation, I have to take it home, study it, compare it to a piano, and get it written in tab before I can play it. Same with bass, but my reading's even worse on the bass clef than treble. WAY worse actually.

So I haven't run into any problems yet in which I'd really need to sight-read something, but it's my opinion that its an essential part of being a musician, and my brother has to read hard-bop melodies everyday in college, so I think its important I get better at this. Can anybody recommend a book of easy material written in notation I can use to practice, or anything else that would help me with this? I really appreciate it.
#2
Unless you're gonna go to music college you don't need it

And your opinion of being a musician is wrong.
#3
Idk about book but this site called 8notes.com has pretty well categorised sheet music according to instrument and according to difficulty.
#4
practice practice practice.
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#5
Quote by rushpython
practice practice practice.


This. There is no other way.

Make flash cards or something.
Buy a something like Real Book and open it to random pages and just play.
#6
musictheory.net

exersises there have some to heklp you learn to recognise notes in standard notation
#7
Quote by Aindreas


And your opinion of being a musician is wrong.


Incredibly inane statement, opinions are never fact and are obviously variable and subjective.


On topic, though, I get your dilemma. There are simple beginner books at local music shops that will teach you to associate notes with locations on the fingerboard, etc.

One thing, though, is that the trouble with reading music on guitar is that, unlike piano, there are multiple ways to play a given pitch, so intuition comes into play there.

One thing that helps with sight reading is a jazz fakebook called The Real Book (6th Edition) . There are multiple volumes if you feel up to it. It's loaded with tunes that range from incredibly simple to "fuck the guy who wrote this," and it can also help with improvisation.

In general, though, it'd be good to get more lessons in theory. Alfred's Essentials of Music Theory is a super good resource to help with identifying inversions, and is a great start. There's an answer key you can get for cheap later, too, if you can't get anyone to correct it for you.

That's a good start, but is there something more specific you're looking for?
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Quote by Pauldapro
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#9
Quote by Most_Triumphant
Go try out violin books or something in the clef you want that works pretty well.


YESYESYESYESYES



Go out and read music for other treble clef instruments (be wary of transposed music, though, like trumpet and the like)
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Quote by Pauldapro
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#10
Grab yourself a book which has the songs for your country's Grade 1 practical music exam, or something equivilant, and go through a few of the songs. However, don't stop and read every note. Try and push yourself to keep reading and play at the same time. Even if at first you make a lot of mistakes, and you have to slow the song down, by you pushing yourself, you'll teach your brain to quickly recongnise musical notes. Eventually, you can move up to 'harder' songs to read, go Grade 2, 3, 4, 5 etc. or equivilants
#11
Quote by Chris_Parker

That's a good start, but is there something more specific you're looking for?

well i guess all i'm looking for is a way to practice reading efficiently. the real book might help, i have the 6th edition i think. if only they had some sort of difficulty ratings on them or something so i knew where to start, that kind of thing would help a lot.

a book or website solely dedicated to efficient reading practice would definitely be the best thing for me right now
#12
I actually had never heard of it before this semester, but a buddy of mine is taking a beginning jazz class at a local community college, and there's a Real Easy Book, where it sort of breaks the songs down for you. Every professor I have tells everyone that the only way to practice sightreading is to do it every day. The general consensus is that you take a few minutes to a half hour just sitting down and reading through a tune, one whichever instrument. Play through it once, then never look at it again (for a while, anyway). Rhythm is the most important element of sightreading, as jazz professors will tell you, but notes are also important. Make sure you play it at a steady tempo, and you go with the tempo. A metronome would help with that, better yet a backing track (and this isn't just for jazz, it's for anything). To add to that further, if you mess up, keep going with the song, don't start over.

I'm sure there are books on just sightreading, it's a huge topic
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Quote by Pauldapro
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#13
learn the notes on the fretboard, and try reading music like the stuff in A Modern Method For Guitar, Wolfhart's or kreutzer's violin studies, the treble clef part of bach 2 part inventions (and eventually try the bass clef part) or if you want something more advanced Bop Duets by Bugs Brouwer try a book like Melodic Rhythms for Guitar or Rhythms Complete to get better at visually identifying the rhythms (though that doesnt seem like your main problem). start reading as slow as you have to (even out of time in the beginning), but just don't stop and go back and figure something out---if you miss a note you've missed that note and have to move on, you can't derail a performance over one mistake.
all the best.
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#14
^The Berklee Press Modern Method books are good, I've used those.
I was an Internet Witness in the mike.h Murder Case.
Quote by Pauldapro
this man is right. everything he says is right. so, stop killing people and get therapy ffs