#1
Hey guys, have you guys go any tips for visualising arpeggios all over the fretboard so that I can easily use them in solos, following chord progressions.

So when the A chord comes, I can straight away find the A arpeggio, and so on.....
#3
Find your root note and learn the shape for it, you can then move it, keepin the shape but start on a different note with very little modification. just like scales.
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#4
Neck Diagrams will help to an extent as far as helping you map anything you need on the fretboard, I agree there. I use it for our Academy, and its fantastic, but it doesn't teach you anything...it just gives you a pallette to work your fretboard ideas on..

But basically you need to just start with one and practice it everywhere then over a static chord progression. Add on from there.

Sean
#5
Absolutely. Start on every A note on the fretboard, and figure out how to play a one octave specific chord quality arpeggio from it. Do all your Maj7's, Min7's, Dom7's, Min7b5's, and then start working on more colorful ones (Sus7, Min7#5, MinMaj7 etc).

Every practice session do it from a different root note. Or maybe once you get really familiar with the basic shapes, start playing from the 3rd to the 3rd, or 5th to 5th, or 7th to 7th.
#6
Can you visualise chords all over the fretboard?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#7
It may not be what you want to hear, but I'd advise that you actually learn how the arpeggios are constructed, rather than taking a visual pattern and applying it to a given note. This will help you out a lot more in the long run because it forces you to engage in making every note, instead of just mindlessly reproducing a pattern.

Nothing in music should be mindless. People may say that an advanced guitarist makes it look effortless, but the truly best musicians are consciously aware of every note they play. A bad place to be as a musician (which is where I admittedly am) is when your mind is disconnected with the work you do and you fall into familiar patterns and licks.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#8
Quote by food1010
It may not be what you want to hear, but I'd advise that you actually learn how the arpeggios are constructed, rather than taking a visual pattern and applying it to a given note. This will help you out a lot more in the long run because it forces you to engage in making every note, instead of just mindlessly reproducing a pattern.

Nothing in music should be mindless. People may say that an advanced guitarist makes it look effortless, but the truly best musicians are consciously aware of every note they play. A bad place to be as a musician (which is where I admittedly am) is when your mind is disconnected with the work you do and you fall into familiar patterns and licks.



I actually already know all this, all the formulas about how arpeggios and chords are constructed, and it does help. I also already know the arpeggio shapes. I guess I will just keep at it.


And yes I can find my chords all over the fretboard
#9
Do you know your intervals on the guitar really well, like seeing any two notes in a position (on any strings) and knowing how they relate M2, P4, m6, etc? Being able to do that will really help with learning arpeggios, chords, scales, etc.
#10
Quote by jsepguitar
Do you know your intervals on the guitar really well, like seeing any two notes in a position (on any strings) and knowing how they relate M2, P4, m6, etc? Being able to do that will really help with learning arpeggios, chords, scales, etc.



yeah, I alreay know the arpeggios and scales etc.

What I am asking is does any one have any tips or tricks for quickly find the arpeggio you need.

Like if you have a chord progression of A major, D major, C# Minor, I need to find an A major arpeggio for the A, and quickly switch to a D arpeggio for the D and quickly to the C arpeggio for the C.

Its just a practice thing so I can quickly find the needed arpeggio with out even thinking about it. I was seeing if any one had any short cuts.
#11
If you are fluent in intervals all over the fretboard, know all the notes and scales on the fretboard, AND can spell chords effortlessly, you shouldn't have to ask us this question. By theory, you should be able to construct your own arpeggios for the necessary chord structures you're playing on top of.

Now, if you can't do this and you want to robot your way through some solos, just learn some basic major/minor arpeggio patterns starting from a root note on the E, A and D strings.

Doing what you said, switching from an A major to D major to a C# minor arpeggio in the same solo as an improv (If you're not asking this question for improv purposes and you already know all the theory you stated, all of this is redundant) takes an advanced understanding of the fretboard. Knowing where a possible D major arpeggio is in relation to your A major arpeggio and figuring it out on the fly is something you just have to study and work out. Extensive knowledge of intervals is SUPER important here.

While there are many shortcuts on the guitar, the only shortcut here is monotony. If you want an easy way out of a difficult concept, just use the same pattern and change root notes. Boooooooring! If you want to truly understand the obvious synergy between chords and their respective arpeggios, you need to explore your possibilities. Don't hold yourself back with short cuts; try harder and apply what you know.

- Justin
An open mind never knows too much.
#12
Quote by jkielq91
I actually already know all this, all the formulas about how arpeggios and chords are constructed, and it does help. I also already know the arpeggio shapes. I guess I will just keep at it.


And yes I can find my chords all over the fretboard
Well, it seems you're on the right track then. Keep at it, and you will get quicker at finding them.
Only play what you hear. If you don’t hear anything, don’t play anything.
-Chick Corea
#13
Quote by Triklino
If you are fluent in intervals all over the fretboard, know all the notes and scales on the fretboard, AND can spell chords effortlessly, you shouldn't have to ask us this question. By theory, you should be able to construct your own arpeggios for the necessary chord structures you're playing on top of.

Now, if you can't do this and you want to robot your way through some solos, just learn some basic major/minor arpeggio patterns starting from a root note on the E, A and D strings.

Doing what you said, switching from an A major to D major to a C# minor arpeggio in the same solo as an improv (If you're not asking this question for improv purposes and you already know all the theory you stated, all of this is redundant) takes an advanced understanding of the fretboard. Knowing where a possible D major arpeggio is in relation to your A major arpeggio and figuring it out on the fly is something you just have to study and work out. Extensive knowledge of intervals is SUPER important here.

While there are many shortcuts on the guitar, the only shortcut here is monotony. If you want an easy way out of a difficult concept, just use the same pattern and change root notes. Boooooooring! If you want to truly understand the obvious synergy between chords and their respective arpeggios, you need to explore your possibilities. Don't hold yourself back with short cuts; try harder and apply what you know.

- Justin


Cheers.

So I just need to get past the need to think about it.
#15
arpeggios are extremely important for improvisation on chord changes. I spent hours and hours practicing them. basically my method was to play 2 octaves in 5 positions, then take a tune and play the arpeggios of the tune up and down using the one or 2 octaves. while doing it I would also say out loud the degree of each note in the arp.

good luck this is tedious but extremely rewarding
#16
Quote by jkielq91

And yes I can find my chords all over the fretboard


Assuming you're familiar with every voicing of those chords, you already know how to make arpeggios, as they are just chords played one note at a time.

The alternative is that you don't know them as well as you think you do, as pointed out in posts above.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#17
Quote by AlanHB
Can you visualise chords all over the fretboard?


This

It's no different
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#18
simply know the notes in the scale you're playing.
furthermore, know where those notes are.

then when you want to play arpeggios you'll know where they are and which notes are accurate for what you want.
#19
play one octave arpeggios from the root third, fifth and seventh in 12 positions and 12 keys (change key without changing position, once you've exhausted all 12 keys, move your position up one fret and do it again).
then take one chord and practice arpegiating it from the root, third fifth and seventh, going through the entire range of your instrument.
all the best.
(insert self-aggrandizing quote here)