#1
A couple guitars I am interested in each have only 2 knobs, one for tone and one for volume. I basically never use a tone knob and would get more use out of a 2nd volume knob so I can mute one pickup for a killswitch sometimes.

Is converting a tone knob into a volume knob simply a matter of removing the tone wire from the tone pot and replacing it with the wires used for the volume pots?
#2
A volume knob is essentially a variable resistor, allowing various amounts of current to flow through the wires. A tone knob is essentially a variable capacitor (which holds charge), and a variable resistor. I don't know if it will be as simple as changing the wires around. I think you will need a new pot.
#3
Quote by quinn_1888
A volume knob is essentially a variable resistor, allowing various amounts of current to flow through the wires. A tone knob is essentially a variable capacitor (which holds charge), and a variable resistor. I don't know if it will be as simple as changing the wires around. I think you will need a new pot.


Not meaning to be disrespectful, but thats bogus xD

They are all Variable Resistors, but the tone knobs have a capacitor (probably in parallel) and what changes the tone is the resistance/capacitance ratio, so, if you remove the capacitor and wire it properly, you can make a second volume pot.

You will probably have to wire only one pickup to that pot though, otherwise you will just mute both pickups.

If you give me a diagram of your current wiring, i can probably adapt it

Antero Duarte
#6
Yeah, just requires removing the cap from the tone pot, and rewire everything. The diagram posted above looks right.
#7
Quote by tntero
Not meaning to be disrespectful, but thats bogus xD

They are all Variable Resistors, but the tone knobs have a capacitor (probably in parallel) and what changes the tone is the resistance/capacitance ratio, so, if you remove the capacitor and wire it properly, you can make a second volume pot.

A tone pot is just a pot in series with a cap to ground. the whole thing is paralell to the signal path it is controlling. caps pass highs more easily than lows (look up capacitive reactance) so those highs flow thru the cap/resistor to ground, thus out of the signal leaving only the lows. the purpose of the pot is to control how easy it is for those highs to even get to the cap. it sort of simulates a variable capacitor.