#1
My RG has no holes for tuner screws. The entire machines are encased in a single metal enclosure, which seems to be held in place just by the tension from the bolt on the front of the headstock. I wanted to put in some locking tuners (iv narrowed the tuning problem down to them) and a graphite nut before i get it set up. Does this mean I have to drill holes for the tuners, and is that really necesary or could i just screw straight in because there is no finish on the back of the headstock?

Thanks.
Anxiously Anticipating An Attractive ADA-MP1 Addition!
#2
Schaller make a version of their locking tuners without the screws in the back. They just bolt on and are held by the nut on the front.
#3
and they work well? i kind of suspect mine are wiggling/rotating from not having screws and that's whats throwing them off.

A side note, how expensive (generally) is a usual setup + graphite nut installation?

edit: holy smokes $89! maybe drilling the holes for the GFS ones might be worth it. the guitar doesnt even have a floyde, the currrent ones just suck and I thought why not locking?
Anxiously Anticipating An Attractive ADA-MP1 Addition!
Last edited by eoinmorgan at Mar 20, 2011,
#4
you can just screw them straight into the wood, they arent that long
#6
The screws that GFS give you SUCK. If you try to screw straight into the headstock, one of the following two things will probably happen: 1) you will destroy the slot for the screwdriver before you manage to get the screw all the way in; or 2) you will snap the screw before it is all the way in. Personal experience (had pilot holes but they were significantly smaller than the screw). Drill pilot holes. It is not hard to do. Pick a drill bit that is the same diameter as the screw minus the screw threads. To avoid drilling all the way through the headstock, place a piece of tape on the drill bit that corresponds to the length of the screw.
Last edited by Rusty_Chisel at Mar 21, 2011,
#7
keep in mind they are VERY small screws. it might be hard putting them in by force. if you have a small enough drill bit and dont go too deep (like out the front of the headstock) it is a fairly simple process.

if you are comfy setting up guitar action installing a nut is a farily simple process. do people take shop class anymore?
#8
Quote by ikey_
keep in mind they are VERY small screws. it might be hard putting them in by force. if you have a small enough drill bit and dont go too deep (like out the front of the headstock) it is a fairly simple process.

if you are comfy setting up guitar action installing a nut is a farily simple process. do people take shop class anymore?


I will see if i can borrow a bit, all my dad's are dull (hes not much of a handyman). Truth is I have no idea how to do action. I wanted to fix two problems: tuning and intonation. The tuners and nut would fix the first, but I cant seem to get action/relief right. I have tried, but all my sources say different things about relief. Some mention a "thin pick's" distance from the fret, other say to get it as close as possible. And I cant get the action lower than about 1.5 mm without HEAVY buzzing. The intonation is also off to the point that the saddle's wont move far enough forward (its super flat on every fret). I figured that the tech could fix the intonation by himself, or if it was an issue with the nut a new nut would sort it out anyway, giving him no excuse for messing up!

I also have no files, and this is my only guitar so I cant mess up.
Anxiously Anticipating An Attractive ADA-MP1 Addition!
#9
Quote by eoinmorgan
I will see if i can borrow a bit, all my dad's are dull (hes not much of a handyman). Truth is I have no idea how to do action. I wanted to fix two problems: tuning and intonation. The tuners and nut would fix the first, but I cant seem to get action/relief right. I have tried, but all my sources say different things about relief. Some mention a "thin pick's" distance from the fret, other say to get it as close as possible. And I cant get the action lower than about 1.5 mm without HEAVY buzzing. The intonation is also off to the point that the saddle's wont move far enough forward (its super flat on every fret). I figured that the tech could fix the intonation by himself, or if it was an issue with the nut a new nut would sort it out anyway, giving him no excuse for messing up!

I also have no files, and this is my only guitar so I cant mess up.

lots of buzzing can be caused by a few things. honestly the lowest action possible varies from guitar to guitar, but nut and saddle height effect it, as well as how level the frets are

the saddles are obviously the easiest to adjust, right at the bridge
the nut isn't really too difficult if you have an idea of what you're doing and have basic tools
then levelling the frets is more time consuming than it is difficult. with the right tools and an idea of what to do you can get it done in an afternoon
#10
ok, i rose to the challenge! GFS has my locking tuners and graphite nuts (i got 3 because I knew I'd screw some up) in the mail. What can I use to widen/deepen the slots for the strings in the nut? I don't have the special files, and would prefer to not buy them. Its a preslotted nut, so does it need any changing at all?
Anxiously Anticipating An Attractive ADA-MP1 Addition!
#11
if you don't use super heavy strings, the pre-slotted slots should work fine

I've never used a gfs nut to know the quality, but just be careful of any sharp edges it might have on it from inconsistent machining