#1
ive wanted to make a body for a while, ive just never worked with wood at all, so im thinking this will be a cheap way to get some experience

can anyone hook me up with some links on how to get started?

if im not mistaken, you just glue a few pieces of thicker plywood together, then shape it and route it, right?
#4
^ +1 If you go with pine and it turns out good, at least you have a much better starting point for a decent guitar. Fender once made Tele's out of pine (I heard).

Make a template from plywood, shape and sand it nice round the edges, then shape your pine blank roughly with a bandsaw or jigsaw. Route the final shape using your template and a 1/2" template cutter bit. Don't route away more than 1/8" at a time.

There are plenty of guides - search on here and youtube for making a guitar. Also, Melvyn Hiscock's book (Google that name) with help you out too.
#5
People still use pine for vintage Tele builds, and it'll sound a lot better than plywood.
#6
would i have to find a lumber yard to get a big enough piece of pine?
I'm really starting from 0 on building anything.

also, what kind of routers should i buy?
what does a "trim router" do? could i use it for routing the pickups and body shape?
http://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-inch-trim-router-44914.html

and there's this one, would this be better for pickup cavities?
http://www.harborfreight.com/electric-cutout-tool-42831.html
#7
You should be able to get pine at most timber merchants (lumber yards), it's easy to get hold of and pretty cheap too.

As for the router, I'd go for something more like this http://www.harborfreight.com/1-1-2-half-hp-variable-speed-plunge-router-67119.html

It'll cost you more, but it's a little more heavy duty. The trim router would be okay for rounding over your edges or routing pickup cavities, but you don't want to start routing bodies with it.
#8
well i was planning on cutting the body out with a jigsaw then rounding it by sanding or using one of those other routers, if possible.

i have a pretty limited budget, so theres my reasoning

would a jigsaw a no no for body cutting/shaping?
Last edited by SKArface McDank at Mar 21, 2011,
#9
You can use a jigsaw, that's what I use. Just be careful when cutting because a jigsaw blade has a tendency to start cutting at an angle. Draw round your template with a marker pen, then give yourself another couple of millimeter outside that outline when cutting the body. Stop regularly and check what the blades doing, especially when you're sawing curves.

As for final shaping, routing will be quicker and the smaller router will do the job. But if you decided to start building more guitars, then I'd recommend investing in the more powerful router.
Last edited by lostcreation333 at Mar 21, 2011,
#11
You don't need a huge piece of pine, this will only cup and twist. Better smaller pieces glued together forming whats called a lamminated body.
#12
would i be better off just buying pine plywood and gluing it together? or would it be worth a 40 minute drive across town to look for some solid pine?
#14
Quote by SKArface McDank
which router were you referring to, the trim router or the "cutout tool"?



Trim router
#15
jesus, you dont know how hard it's going to be to find a decent lumber yard in bakersfield....

the first place i called "84 Lumber" only had plywood and pieces of doug fir
#16
Bakersfield must have something.
If its possible to get to the San Fernando Valley, check out Far West Plywood.
I got the Baltic Birch for my speaker cabinet ( https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1399362 ) there.
While I was there, I saw several pieces of Mahogany that were the perfect size for a guitar body.
So I would bet that they have other wood species as well.
#18
a couple of planks of pine glued together will be fine, try a local hardware store. pine is used for everything. or if youve got any old furniture sitting in a shed or something, just chop it up lol
jig saw will be fine for cutting out body, though my personal jig saw is too short and cant cut the depth
the smaller weaker routers would work fine for pine because its so easy to work with, but when working on a hard wood, the better router will certainly win out.