#1
I play blues mostly and I feel like I'm stuck in a rut and I have stopped improving. For instance I can improvise forever but its all the same four or five licks and scales. I miss notes here and there. I was wondering how I could get out of this rut. Thanks.
#3
^+1 SRV gets me out of a rut so often.

Learn different kinds of songs, that you like. Everything gives you something that you can/almost certainly will use in your improvisation at some point, whether you know it or not.

Sometimes it's good to also just concentrate on technique, that often gets me out of a rut too.
#4
Quote by Rckin2fame56
I play blues mostly and I feel like I'm stuck in a rut and I have stopped improving. For instance I can improvise forever but its all the same four or five licks and scales. I miss notes here and there. I was wondering how I could get out of this rut. Thanks.


Try playing without using any of your licks. Play in small phrases. I don't know what you understand about theory, but if you know the inclusion of major 3rds against minor thirds, you can invoke some cool ideas. Another thing I like to do is invoke tritones off any note in the blues scale to add some ear twisting moments.

There are a lot of things that you can try depending upon what you know/understand.

Best,

Sean
#5
Quote by Sean0913
Try playing without using any of your licks. Play in small phrases. I don't know what you understand about theory, but if you know the inclusion of major 3rds against minor thirds, you can invoke some cool ideas. Another thing I like to do is invoke tritones off any note in the blues scale to add some ear twisting moments.

There are a lot of things that you can try depending upon what you know/understand.

Best,

Sean

major thirds and minor thirds?
#6
Yes. I'm not sure what you know about theory or intervals. But it's a very distinctive thing, where a minor third is followed by a Major 3rd as a passing tone, much like the familiar blues note (b5) is used


For example, if you play the Minor pentatonic blues in G, and you play the 3rd string 3rd fret, that's a Bb or the minor 3rd interval of G. Hammer on from there, to the 4th fret on the G string, and you've just played a major 3rd of G, or the B note. From there playing in the familiar pentatonic minor scale will complete the effect.

It's just a "flavor note" thats used a lot in blues. Dont sit on it, but use it as a sort of splash to your playing. If you don't know theory, I'd recommend it, it can open up a whole lot of options as a player!

Best,

Sean
#7
Quote by Sean0913
Yes. I'm not sure what you know about theory or intervals. But it's a very distinctive thing, where a minor third is followed by a Major 3rd as a passing tone, much like the familiar blues note (b5) is used


For example, if you play the Minor pentatonic blues in G, and you play the 3rd string 3rd fret, that's a Bb or the minor 3rd interval of G. Hammer on from there, to the 4th fret on the G string, and you've just played a major 3rd of G, or the B note. From there playing in the familiar pentatonic minor scale will complete the effect.

It's just a "flavor note" thats used a lot in blues. Dont sit on it, but use it as a sort of splash to your playing. If you don't know theory, I'd recommend it, it can open up a whole lot of options as a player!

Best,

Sean

ok thanks.
#9
Try learning songs that aren't blues songs that you also like. Then try applying some of the new licks or chords you've learned in your blues improvisation.
Also, try focusing on the rhythms your using in your soloing or chording. Find three notes you like that you don't typically use in your solos and then find interesting rhythmical ways of using those notes.
#10
Do what Alan said,...get the tabs to the solos and see what they are doing. I am still amazed at how so many different ways the minor pentatonic has been played using that same old box shape. However, seeing how different guitar players respond to the changes using that box shape should help you out. Also learning other styles of music can be helpful, especially jazz and country.
MARTY FRIEDMAN--"It’s a lot easier to be technical than it is stylized; it really is... But I think it’s a lot more rare to have someone who’s really got their own sound because that’s something you can’t practice."
#12
I have had the same problem, and like others I have found that playing solos or songs that aren't typically "blues" in scale they lend there sound and varying techniques that might be able to become incorporated in some blues songs. Just like some metal bands use fast blues runs for a nice break-up (Mastodon) you could use some of the same ideas for your mental hurdle.
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#13
make another pattern of it instead of the same old boring pattern
e|----------------------------5-8-------------------------------------------|
B|-----------------------5-8------------------------------------------------|
G|-----------------5-7------------------------------------------------------|
D|-----------5--7-----------------------------------------------------------|
A|------5-7-----------------------------------------------------------------|
E|-5-8----------------------------------------------------------------------|
try
e|---------------------------------8-10-12-------------------------------------|
B|--------------------------8-10------------------------------------------------|
G|-----------------5-7-9--------------------------------------------------------|
D|------------5-7---------------------------------------------------------------|
A|----3-5-7---------------------------------------------------------------------|
E|-5-----------------------------------------------------------------------------|

Its just like instead of playing the same old boring chords you would invert them and find new ways to play them, the same thing goes with scales.
Spice things up!
Listen to great Blues Players like B.B King, Hendrix, Vaughan learn some of thier licks
Quote by kaptkegan
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