#1
fast picking !!!! is it the pick ?? , is it the way im holding it ?? is it practicing ??
i've been playing electric guitar for five years now and i cant get an accurate and fast picking like Malmsteen , Vinnie moore and PG so please help me guys !!
and i've tried all kinds of exercises , like PG exercise (the famous three notes on a string , one note on the next one ) and lots of other exercises , but until now im not able to do fast accurate runs.
Last edited by yunesbb at Mar 21, 2011,
#2
Firstly i recommend jazz 3 picks if you arent already using them. Secondly your synchronisation between left and right hands may not be in order so try practicing modal scale runs (they are the funnest to shred). Start off slowly and alternate your picking on each note and I find playing 3 notes per string is the best way. Also its good fun to mix it up but going back and forward in steps on the modal runs. Remember start off slow and build up - thats the key. I hope this will give u a hand
#3
Metronome.

Play the exercises, scales, whatever, with a metronome set slow. And only when you can play perfectly, accurate and in time and economically, increase the the tempo just a few beats. Repeat until speedy.

This will take months if not years. You also need to do it when it comes to actually learning a song with fast picking. Set the metronome slow, play it perfectly, and gradually increase the speed.
#5
Quote by dennymcf
Firstly i recommend jazz 3 picks if you arent already using them. Secondly your synchronisation between left and right hands may not be in order so try practicing modal scale runs (they are the funnest to shred). Start off slowly and alternate your picking on each note and I find playing 3 notes per string is the best way. Also its good fun to mix it up but going back and forward in steps on the modal runs. Remember start off slow and build up - thats the key. I hope this will give u a hand

Agreed. Try standard Jazz III's, or if you think they're too small use Jazz III XL's, thats what I use and I like them. You could also try Dunlop Speedpick's, which I haven't tried but want to.
#6
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#8
Pick has alot to do with it, as others have said use Jazz III's or XL's.

It's also a matter of mindset, if you're sitting there all tensed up because you are not picking fast or accurately enough, its never going to happen. You have to relax. Just practice exercises with a drum machine or metronome and it will eventually come to you.
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#10
Quote by seeneyj
Everyone wants to be a guitar hero overnight.....

i've been playing for five years now , troll !!!
#12
Try a flexible Dunlop pick 60mm.
I always use it for fast picking eg. Slayer, Metallica and when I do, It's usually faster than when I use a harder pick
#13
Quote by yunesbb
i've been playing for five years now , troll !!!

Paul Gilbert, Yngwie. amd Vinny Moore have all been playing for many, many more years than you have, even maybe decades. Don't be discouraged if you can't play like them after only 5 years of playing guitar. As long as you keep working on it, it will come, hard work always pays off.

On top of what everyone has already said, I think it's important to mention that when you you are playing, there should be as little tension in your body as possible. make sure you're not choking the pick, you're not fretting harder than is needed, and your arms, wrists, and shoulders are not tensed up. You should always feel relaxed when you are playing guitar, even when playing fast. When all of the pro guitar players make it "look easy", it really is easy for them, and they're not all tensed up and struggling to play. Make sure you are playing within your limits, but are also pushing yourself too.
#14
i've been playing for seven and can play (comfortably) maybe 10notes/second. i dont claim to work on my technique a lot, but if you want to get as good as the guys you mentioned, it will take multiple years of very grinding practice.
#15
A certain pick is only going to help if it's a pick you're comfortable with - Jazz IIIs are not a one-size-fits-all pick for shredding or any other playing style. iirc Gilbert uses the thinnest Tortext pick (the red one) for instance. I'm no expert shredder but I've yet to find anything I like better than a Tortex .73.

That said, I can play with pretty much any kind of pick if I need to. Good technique is infinitely more important than gear minutiae, so focus on staying relaxed, maintaining your rhythm, and playing cleanly instead of micromanaging your setup.
#16
Try not to lose perspective. Just because you are shit compared to Paul Gilbert doesnt mean youre shit compared to yourself a year or two ago - you might not be seeing anything miraculous but you are probably improving.
Make sure you notice yourself getting better over time, record yourelf every month or something like that, you might find it motivational. Dont get too bogged down in alternate picking, try new things aswell.

Im in a similar situation myself actually but Ive started seeing a guitar teacher who is really good. He has given me exercises and stuff and I reckon Im getting better quicker than I did when I was relying on myself - paying someone 25 quid a week to tell you to practice more seems to work for me.
He has given me Frank Gambales Chop Builder, a guitar workout DVD - its good, although Ive only really tried one of the exercises in it so far (the modal scale one, starting at 90 bpm and got it up to full speed of 120 after a few weeks, a real workout for the alternate picking).


Edit: Paul Gilbet uses Medium gauge picks, not the lightest. Id recommend at least medium because you can get a stronger tone and they dont bend so easily. There is a reason so many jazzers and shedders play Jaz III's, but as long as youre comfortable with the pick and it isnt too thin then it doesnt (or shouldnt) really matter.

Edit Edit: If youre gonna buy Jazz IIIs get the XLs, they have more grip. After playing with them the normal ones slip out of my hand but I am more comfortable playing wit ordinary plectrums if I have to because the size is similar.

Edit Edit Edit Edit Edit: Why not make a video of yourself playing and post it here? I think there might be a thread for that infact
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Mar 23, 2011,
#17
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efq_lPN2TZE

That's at least an orange, which is .60. I can't tell for sure if it's red (.50) or orange though. Video is a few years old but then so is the one I'm thinking of (or was it an interview... either way >_>, he may well have changed picks since then.
#18
Maybe we got different definitions of light, I'd call his medium (by thinnest tortex i thought you meant thinnest pick dunlop makes, which would be some paper thin acoustic-strumming pick, I geuss I misread). In fact paul gilbert shows the pick he uses on his site - http://www.paulgilbert.com/Guitars.html - A tortex .60

But obviously technique is more important - sure its easier to shred on an Ibanez with .9s etc but you might also wanna be able to let it rip on a Gibson ES335 with high action and fat strings.
In fact after spending a few weeks practicing sweeps on my Strat with high action and 10s I found playing my Ibanez again to be easier than Id ever found it, and really appreciated the jumbo frets like never before. I do most of my technique practicing with my Strat nowadays.


A bit more on topic, Paul Gilbert has a lesson on youtube discussing the mechanics of picking, that might be worth a look.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#20
thank you all guyz specially Hydra150 , zincabopataurio , dennymcf and Froggy McHop
#21
Quote by Hydra150
Maybe we got different definitions of light, I'd call his medium (by thinnest tortex i thought you meant thinnest pick dunlop makes, which would be some paper thin acoustic-strumming pick, I geuss I misread). In fact paul gilbert shows the pick he uses on his site - http://www.paulgilbert.com/Guitars.html - A tortex .60

lol yeah, I just meant light as Tortex Standards go Thanks for finding that.

But obviously technique is more important - sure its easier to shred on an Ibanez with .9s etc but you might also wanna be able to let it rip on a Gibson ES335 with high action and fat strings.
In fact after spending a few weeks practicing sweeps on my Strat with high action and 10s I found playing my Ibanez again to be easier than Id ever found it, and really appreciated the jumbo frets like never before. I do most of my technique practicing with my Strat nowadays.

Very true; I mostly practice on my acoustic because of this. On that note, string gauge is another thing you shouldn't micromanage in favor of technique. If you like the sound/feel of 11s better than 9s, tear it up with 11s! Alex Skolnick uses 13s these days
Last edited by Nightfyre at Mar 23, 2011,
#22
yay I was helpful
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#23
Just to add, to play quickly you need to:
1. Ensure your technique is efficient. This means minimal finger and hand movement. The less distance everything moves, the more likely it will be that it can do it quickly.

2. Ensure you play with minimal effort. A lot of players (me included!) get into the habit of tensing a little during fast passages. Unfortunately this is completely counter productive. The tight muscles restrict the fingers ability to move freely. A big part of my practice these days involves monitoring the tension in my hands/arms/etc and actively working to reduce it. The goal for me is to play with such a light touch during fast passages that if I went any lighter the notes actually wouldn't sound correctly.

3. Practice, practice, practice. When you get tired of this, practice. To play things quickly you really need to over learn things. As learning progresses the brain progressively starts to assume responsibility for executing the movement(s). Have a think about when you walk. There is no conscious 'left leg, right leg' dialog going on in your head. Walking wasn't something you were born with the ability to do, it is a skill you have acquired through practice. However it is so over practiced that you do it now without any conscious thought or effort. In the same way, to play things quickly we have to practice them to a point where the brain automatically does the bulk of the work. This takes a considerable amount of effort over a long period.

In the initial stages of learning you will need to focus on complete accuracy. In this first stage the brain is trying to get a clear picture concerning what you are trying to do: what finger, what fret, down stroke or upstroke etc. etc.. Playing too quickly in this initial stage slows learning. Why? The thing you are practicing is never really played the exact same way twice, due to the mistakes that are invariably made. So, one time through the brain thinks they are trying to play this, the next time it is slightly different, so the brain thinks they are trying to play that, and so on.

Later in learning it is important to focus on the physical feeling of playing the thing you are trying to learn. Generally we tend to stare at our fretboards when practicing. However this visual information isn't really used by the brain as it learns. Proof of this can be seen in the capabilities of blind musicians, who by and large play just as well as those with sight. If you focus on the physical feeling of playing you are much closer to the 'language' the brain uses in learning. This works in well with the idea of monitoring tension so that you play with minimal effort too.

Practicing with a metronome is also a great idea.

Good luck!
#24
u gotta remember those guys have been playing all there life probably putting in 12 to 14 hours of guitar playing a day,good luck and practice plenty.