#1
Yes I'm back, with the exact same question. Lol. My question is, what exactly is a pentatonic scale besides a scale with only five notes? What makes a pentatonic scale? If I have the scale of F Major how do I know which two notes to leave out to make it a pentatonic scale? And what if I'm playing in Hungarian Minor but I want to play in the Hungarian Minor Pentatonic instead? How can I figure that out? Thanks

Oh, and I checked up on the FAQ but the only info I could get is the pentatonic scales for the major scale and it's modes. That's great and all, but I want to know how they're derived so I can apply the theory to other scales.
Last edited by Tablature! at Mar 21, 2011,
#2
Depending on what key the song is in you can play pentatonics on the ii, iii, vi, and sometimes vii of the chord
for example if you wanted to play pentatonics in the key of F you would use G, A, D, or E as the starting positions for the pentatonic scales.

As for your first question, there are lots of youtube videos on that. Just type in pentatonics in the search bar and you'll be set.
#3
Pentatonic = pent (five) and tonic (served with gin).

Anyway - a pentatonic has five notes right? in a minor scale, you have

-the root, the 2nd, the minor 3rd, the 4th, the 5th, the minor 6th, and the minor 7th.

essentially, for a pentatonic, you remove the 2 and the 6 from play to make it

-R m3 4 5 m7.

in A, this would be... A, C, D, E and G. An Am scale without the 2 and 6 removed is...A B C D E F G
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
Last edited by Banjocal at Mar 21, 2011,
#4
Basically the pentatonics as you understand them, are Major and minor scales with the "problem" bits removed. These are usually notes that have a great chance of clashing if stopped upon. As a result of those being removed, the scale is much more predictable and stable, and noticeably harder to muff up on. This is great for people who are learning to play lead, and for those who just want to rock out and stay safe...its also a very versatile scale in that it can fit in any number of styles.

In minor the scale tones that are "removed" are the 2 and the 6
In major the scale tones that are "removed" are the 4 and the 7

Now...if you want to know "why", this will require some foundation legwork on your own but you might start by learning what makes up a major scale and minor scale, and then study intervals, and read up on what a minor 2nd dissonance is, and then when you deconstruct the pentatonics, you'll have insight as to why.

This also answers the other question, and that is, to know how to use it with some exotic scale, you'd have to divine what are the potential problem notes that you might want to weed out and from there derive your own "scale".

This is something that again, will require you to do the legwork on and build a firm theoretical foundation to answer. Most people just like to hop on and ride these scales, and you're welcome to do that too. If, however you are looking for understanding, you need to start at the basics, and this is definitely not at that starting off point.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 21, 2011,
#5
Quote by Tablature!
Yes I'm back, with the exact same question. Lol. My question is, what exactly is a pentatonic scale besides a scale with only five notes? What makes a pentatonic scale? If I have the scale of F Major how do I know which two notes to leave out to make it a pentatonic scale? And what if I'm playing in Hungarian Minor but I want to play in the Hungarian Minor Pentatonic instead? How can I figure that out? Thanks

Oh, and I checked up on the FAQ but the only info I could get is the pentatonic scales for the major scale and it's modes. That's great and all, but I want to know how they're derived so I can apply the theory to other scales.

technically, i dont think it matters what two notes you take out unless you want THE pentatonic scale which takes out the most dissonant notes of the major or minor scale. sometimes i might use other pentatonic patterns to highlight those tones however. for example, if i were in A minor, i could play D minor and E minor pentatonic patterns and they would still fit in the key of A minor.
#6
Quote by Banjocal
Pentatonic = pent (five) and tonic (served with gin).

Anyway - a pentatonic has five notes right? in a minor scale, you have

-the root, the 2nd, the minor 3rd, the 4th, the 5th, the minor 6th, and the minor 7th.

essentially, for a pentatonic, you remove the 2 and the 6 from play to make it

-R m3 4 5 m7.

in A, this would be... A, C, D, E and G. An Am scale without the 2 and 6 removed is...A B C D E F G


Ha! I finally get your sig! Glorious day!