#1
I'm thinking of picking up a warmoth body and I'd like to dye it but I have no experience with dye. Do I rub it on or can I spray it through an hvlp gun? That'd be to get the color. 2nd would be what do I do to get a nice shiny finish? Clear coat it with lacquer? Finally, where would I get the dye? I particularly like the deep sapphire blues and emerald greens that warmoth has.
#2
You can wipe or spray stain.

Clear coat with lacquer then sand to about 2000 grit and buff to get a gloss finish.




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#5
can you use clear tru oil as a clear coat on top of the dye or not?
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#6
Quote by syntheticocean
I don't want stain though. I want dye. Or are they considered the same thing? Ithought dye only came powdered and needed to be activated with alcohol?



Dye is NOT stain. There are a few different types. I just use Rit powder because its cheap and works with water. Basically you stir it into some water and rub it into the wood. You have to be very fast with it or it gets blotchy. The water allows you to wet a rag with plain water to wipe it and get the color you want.

Basically you start with black. Let it dry and sand it back. Then you can put your lighter colors on top. Basically, dye, sand, dye sand until you get what you want.

Read this:

http://lumberjocks.com/trifern/blog/9400

Its a bout a vase or something but its the same concept and his results are awesome.
#7
Quote by crice6505
can you use clear tru oil as a clear coat on top of the dye or not?


I don't know if you can use oil over the top of a dye. Seems like it would mess with the pigments. Most people just use an oil that has a tint to it already like boiled linseed oil to pop the grain of the wood. You can put a sealer like poly over it but you have to wait quite awhile for the oil to cure.
Last edited by samhell at Mar 22, 2011,
#8
Quote by samhell
Dye is NOT stain. There are a few different types. I just use Rit powder because its cheap and works with water. Basically you stir it into some water and rub it into the wood. You have to be very fast with it or it gets blotchy. The water allows you to wet a rag with plain water to wipe it and get the color you want.

Basically you start with black. Let it dry and sand it back. Then you can put your lighter colors on top. Basically, dye, sand, dye sand until you get what you want.

Read this:

http://lumberjocks.com/trifern/blog/9400

Its a bout a vase or something but its the same concept and his results are awesome.


looks awesome, but at the end he says to use wipe on poly. What I don't get is wipe on poly never has that perfect of a finish, its never as smooth as glass, so what did he do to get that specific finish after the dye?
#9
Quote by syntheticocean
looks awesome, but at the end he says to use wipe on poly. What I don't get is wipe on poly never has that perfect of a finish, its never as smooth as glass, so what did he do to get that specific finish after the dye?


Unless you have a nice sprayer and a nice painting area they never come out smooth like glass. For your gloss coats you can spray, you don't have to use a wipe on poly. (I've never wiped on a finish on a guitar). You can still use a wipe on if you want, you just have to use a lot more coats and make sure its thick enough that you don't sand through it when you are leveling it. After you do your gloss coats you have to let it sit there for a month or so to off gas. Just because its dry to the touch doesn't mean ites fully cured. Waiting sucks but its important. Then start wet sanding. I start with 600 or 800 and work my way up to 2000 grit and then use micromeshs to 12000. Then I use mirror glaze 7 or 9 and then finally a nice wax and a buffer. Super glossy. I've read that PRS has an awesome finishing department so they don't ever have to sand the finishes, just buff them.

The guy who makes the vases wipes on some poly and then sands it back a little to smooth it. Then wipes on another coat and sands it back, etc. I've done this when making bowls on a lathe and it works fine. Takes like 20 coats but its smooth and glossy when finished and after the micromesh sanding.

If you use water based stuff never use steel wool because supposedly tiny particles can wedge in little corners and stuff and start rusting. Never seen it in my life but thats what I was told.
Last edited by samhell at Mar 22, 2011,
#14
Quote by syntheticocean
Awesome Sam. Thanks for the in depth explanation. I've got a decent HVLP sprayer that gives me great results with paint. I'll probably try this.


Perfect. I need an HVLP sprayer. I've been wanting one for awhile. You have to get your mix down for the clear coat but once you do you should be rocking. Which sprayer do you have? I've been told the cheaper one from Rockler/Harbor Freight is actually pretty good.
#16
By the way, what the heck are you dying/coating? Some cool flame top PRS clone or something?
#17
Quote by syntheticocean
Thats the one I'm using. The 15$ one from harbor freight, with a simple 3gallon compressor from there. Spent a total of 65$ there and I get pro finishes for a fraction of the price.


Ah, I have that gun too. Haven't used it yet because my compressor is too weak. I would be able to spray for like 2 seconds and then wait a minute or two to re-pressurize the tank.
#18
Get a pressure regulator sam. 10$. Initially I could only spray for about 10 seconds before the tank was empty. With the regulator I can do all the sides of the guitar and then some. Its a weak tank but for what I use it for it does the job. I'm not using it for air tools. I'm considering trying it with a nailgun, but I doubt it'll do the job.
#19
Quote by syntheticocean
Get a pressure regulator sam. 10$. Initially I could only spray for about 10 seconds before the tank was empty. With the regulator I can do all the sides of the guitar and then some. Its a weak tank but for what I use it for it does the job. I'm not using it for air tools. I'm considering trying it with a nailgun, but I doubt it'll do the job.


Funny, I use an air nailer all the time and have no problems. I guess I should give the sprayer a shot! What PSI do you set your regulator to for that sprayer?
#21
Quote by syntheticocean
The specific paint I'm using at the moment is Duplicolor, and on the can it calls for 30-40psi. It works perfectly fine at that.

What PSI is the air nailer? I have very little experience with them.


Depending on the nail and the material 80-100 PSI. I usually pop one into scrap and see how it sets before using it on a project.
#25
Quote by samhell
Dye is NOT stain.
Technically it is. However, all stain is not dye...

Dye stains are made up of materials that dissolve in water or spirits whereas pigment stains are just that- pigment particles that float around in whichever liquid.
#26
I always use dyes and i hate stains. Most dyes can be rubbed on full strength and you'll get a great finish. Actually they're better when rubbed on rather than sprayed on when you've got a consistant tight grained wood, as you'll get more dye into the fibres and pores and you'll get a richer finish, specially with figured woods.